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ISSUE 5 ■ NOVEMBER 1988 V C2.95 




CARTOON 
CAPERS 

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW 
TO CREATE YOUR OWN 
SUPERHERO 



GRAPHICS 
OF THE FUTURE 

Photo-quality pictures and the 
computers which generate them 



ROBOTS AT HOME! 

Master the universe 
with Robokit ST 

SLIDE SHOW SUPREME 

'Lights! Camera! Action!' takes 
centre stage on the Amiga 

SUPER SPEED ST 

Biitterise your micro 

with our step-by-step guide 







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MENACE 





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new! super- 



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DAiEL ELECiTOniO 




□ AMIGA PRO SAMPLER STUDIO 



• A top quality sound sampling system at a realistic 
price. 

• All the usual features of a sampling system plus 
many more. 

• 100% machine code software for realtime functions. 



• Variable sample rate and playback speed. 

• Separate scroU line waveform windows plus zoom 
function with Edit windows for fine accurate editing. 

• Hardware compatible with many other software 



• Hires sample editing. 

• Realtime frequency display. 

• Realtime level meters. 

• Files saved to IFT format. 

• Adjustable manual/automatic record trig level. 

ONLY £69.9 COMPLETE SYSTEM, PLEASE STSTE ABOO/ 1000/8000 



• Software files can be used within other music 
utilities. 

• Reverse, copy, mix clear plus other edit facilities. 

• Microphone and line input \\" Jack and Din 
connections. 

• 3D 6bot of sound waveform. Wave editor to design 
your own waveforms or adjust existing ones. 



□ DATEL JAMMER 

lb complement the Sample Studio the Datel 
Jammer gives you a 5 octave keyboard to 
play and record your sampled sounds. 
FBATUBBS: 

• 2 and 3 note chords. 

• 4 track sequencer up to 9999 



• Tempo and Beat Controls. 

• Mixer Controls on Instruments. 

• Load and Save sequence. 

• Works on standard IFF file sounds. 




□ 1SK/STORAGE 
BOX OFFERS 

• DD40 holds 40 3y 2 " disks lockable. 

only £6.99 

• DD80 holds 80 3"y 2 " disks lockable. 
only €8.99 

• Disks - 3*/ 2 " D/DS/D. 

• lop quality, bulk packed with 



G DATA/SWITCH 
BOXES 

• A/B type connect two printers to one computer 
or (vice-versa). 

• Centronics connections or RS232 (Serial) connections 
(25 pin) please state. 

only €24.99 

• ABC type connect three printers to one computer 
(or vice versa). 

• Centronics or RS232 connections. 

only £34.99 

• Intelligent Printer Sharer. 

• Share one Printer between four computers. 

• Automatic switching - no need to leave your computer. 

• RS232 serial or Centronics connections - please state. 

ONLY £24.99 FOR 25. ONLY €79.99 

• ST COPY - 

DEEP SCAN NIBBLE!? 

□ Copy an entire disk - even highly protected programs - in under 60 
seconds. 

[_J Works with one drive or two. 

□ Multiple copy option allows you to make many copies from one original. 

□ Copy 1 or 2 disk sides - upto 85 tracks. 

□ Special format parameters for non standard formats. 

□ Using 1040 ST copy a whole disk in one pass with single drive. 

□ Compatible with 520 and 1040 ST 

□ Unique 'INFO' anajyser - displays vital disk parameters, including sector 
distribution, data dispersion, interleave status, etc., etc. 

□ Pull verify option. 

□ Easy to use Icon driven program takes the mystery out of disk backup 

only 129.99 



□ MIDIMASTER 

• Full Midi Interface for A500/ 
2000/1000 (Please state model) 

• Compatible with most leading 
Midi packages (inc. D/Music) 

• Midi In - Midi Out x 3 - 
Midi Thru 

• Fully Opto Isolated 

• No need to pay more - 
Full Midi standard 

only £34.99 



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• 25 pin 'D' to 36 way Centronics 
parallel lead. 

• A 500 or 1000 please state. 

• 1,2m length. 

only £8.99 

• 25 pin 'D' to 25 pin 'D' - serial 
printer lead. 

• A500 or 1000 - please state. 

• 2m length. 

only £8.99 




DAiEL ELECiTOfllO 



□ EXTERNAL 3.5 DISK DRIVE 



• Slimline extra low profile unit - only 6" long! 

• Ibp quality NEC drive mechanism 

• Throughport allows daisychainiog other drives. 

• A superbly styled case finished in computer colours. 

• Fully compatible 

• 1 meg unformatted capacity 

• Good length cable for positioning on your desk etc 



• VUnt tor for money - before you buy a drive, 
please compare the features - this drive has an 
NEC drive unit and is housed in a superb housing - 
many units available are built to a price and not to 
a standard. Don't spend a few pounds less and end 
up with 'rubbish' - and remember your are buying 
from the manufacturer 



• Complete - no more to buy 

• Atari version comes complete with necessary power 
supply 

ONLY £1 14.99 POST FREE 

ADD (&S for Courier delivery if required). 




□ 512K RAM EXTENSION • A500 

• Available with/without calendar clock option 

• Simply plugs internally into a ASOO slot 

• Fitted in minutes - no soldering etc. 

• With calendar/clock onboard time/date automatically booted 

• Battery backed to retain time/date 

ONLY £ 1 09*99 FOR STANDARD 512K CARD OR 
ONLY F FOR VERSION WITH CLOCK/ CALENDAR 




□ MARAUDER II 

• Quite simply the best disk copier 
(all models) 

Q Superfast disk copier will copy almost any 
commercial disk 

Q Friendly user Interface - Mouse driven 
throughout. 

□ Completely compatible with Amiga 
multitasking system 

[_J Even decrypts many encoded programs 
including D.Print/Video/ Paint/Music/II 
etc. 

ONLY £29.99 POST FREE 



available for the Amiga 

□ Special 'Strategy Files' cope with even the 
most advanced protection schemes 

□ Supports upto 5 drives simultaneously for 
multiple copies 

□ Regular updates available - we always 
ship the latest 

□ Fast operation - typical^ around 80 
seconds 

□ US/Vs top selling copier 




• 1 MEG 



UPGRADE 

Q Replace internal 500K drive with a 

full 1 meg unit. 
Q Ibp quality NEC drive unit. 

□ Full fitting instructions. 

□ Easily fitted no special skills 
required. 

□ Direct plug in replacement. 

□ Available now. 

only £99.99 



• 1 MEG RAM 
UPGRADE KIT 

□ Complex kit to fit internally into 
520 STFM. 

□ 512K of FASTRAM to bring your 
520 upto a full 1040K!! 

r CJ Fitting is a straightforward 
soldering job - achieved by 
anyone who has a little experience. 

Q Makes unit fully 1040 Ram 
compatible. 

□ Complete with illustrated 
instructions, 

only £99.99 



• IOLDER/DESOLDER KIT 



□ If you wish to do you own Ram 
upgrade then we can supply the 
tools. 

i_j Quality soldering iron plus a 
desolder sucker tool and solder. 



Q No more to buy. 

□ Useful for many other jobs too. 

ONLY £9.99 



ALL ORDERS NORMALLY DESPATCHED WITHIN 48 HRS 

HOW TO ORDER.... 



BY PHONE 

0782 744707 
24 hr Credit Card Line 



BY POST 

EZ 

Send cheques, POs made 
payable to 'Datel Electronics' 



PAX 

0782 744292 



UK ORDERS POST FREE 

EUROPE ADD £1 

OVERSEAS ADD £3 



PRICES AND SPECIFICATIONS CORRECT AT TIME OF PRESS AND 
SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



DAiEL cLEClTOIIIO 



DATEL ELECTRONICS LTD., FEHTON INDUSTRIAL ESTATE, 
GOVAN ROAD, PEETON, STOKE-ON-TRENT, ENGLAND. 



SALES ONLY 
0782 744707 



TECHNICAL ONLY 
0782 744324 





ADVERTISING 
MANAGER 

Nora Lawton 

(061-474 7333) 

PUBLISHER 

Chris Anderson 




subscriptions; 
mail order 

Future Publishing Ltd, 
"he Old Barn, Somen? 
Somerset TA 11 7PY 
0458 74011 



DTOGRAPHY 

Hon James, 4 Saw 
Close. Bath 




PRINTERS 

Web Offset, 
Plymouth 





DISTRIBUTORS 

SM Distribution, 6 

Leigham Court Rd, 

StreathamSW16 2P' 



© Future Publishing 
Ltd 1988 

ST/Amiga Format is an 
independent publication 
and has no links what- 
soever with Atari or 
Commodore. 
We welcome unsolich 
contributions from 
readers. Please encli 
an SAE with material 
you want it returned. 
Payment for accepted 
items is made 4 weeks 

after publication. 

No part of this magazine 

may be reproduced in 

any form without 

permission. 






4 ■ FORMAT 




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NEWS 



The shape of things to come, as seen at the 
1988 PC show. All the latest news, plus new 
arrivals at the gameplayers' ball. 

I PIXEL. 
PUNCHERS 

Today's top computer graphics, from STs and 
Amigas to Crays. We pull the best shots. 

ST BLITTER 
BOOST 

Turbocharge your ST by adding a blitter chip, 
photo-by-photo guide to this cost-effective 
upgrade, plus HiSoft's 'software blitter'. 




AMIGA MIDI 
INTERFACE 

Build your own Amiga MIDI interface and save 
yourself pounds on shop prices. 

GOLD DUST 



Steve Gold hunts down the hottest gossip and 
rashest rumours for ST and Amiga. 



DISK 
EXTRA 

Not one but two fabulous fully 
playable games: Spooks for 
the ST and Amoeboids for the 
Amiga, as well as our usual 
bevvy of utilities and droleries 
for all tastes. 





1 





ESC 



SPECIAL 
OFFERS 

More bargains than Del-boy's stall - avail 
yourself of the Format holdall's contents. 

ST PD 



A handpicked selection of the finest new ST 
Public Domain utilities to come our way. 

LETTERS 



The post strike's over, and de joint is jumpin' 
again. Roll up for some repartee. 

ESCAPE 
SEQUENCE 

Could this be the end of Format as we know it? 
Well, until next time anyway. 




GAMES 






SCREEN 
PLAY 

This month's Format Gold 
award goes to the superb 
gameplay and animated 
graphics of Menace. Also 
sample the wonders of 
Stargoose, Fusion and all the 
month's top releases. 




GAME 
BUSTERS 

The biggest games cracked: 
Virus and Pandora laid bare, 
plus a stunning make-your-own 
map kit for Dungeon Master. 



"Mmi 




GRAPHICS 



CARTOON 
CAPERS 

You don't need £1000- 
worth of hardware and 
software to create 
great pictures -just a 
little know-how. Learn 
■the inside secrets of the 
cartoonist's trade. 




o 
o 



CRL's new ST sprite designer-cum-animation 
tester faces the Format team's testbench. 



~Sl 



ANIMATION: 
FLIPPER 



18 



A neat little animation prototyper for the Amiga. 
String those pics together and make them fly! 



m 



ROBOKIT 



74 



Eat your heart out C3P0 - robotics is here on 
the ST, with this brand new controller package. 





LIGHTS! 
CAMERA! ACTION! 

The ultimate Amiga slide show program arrives - 
mix music with some amazing video effects and 
run your own art show. 



DTP UPDATE 



43 



Reviews of the latest versions of Shakespeare 
(Amiga) and Timeworks DTP (ST). 



EUROPE ONE 
USA NIL? 




Normally we're used to reading 
stories in the press about how this or 
that superb British innovation has 
been woefully neglected by the 
government, and the inventors have 
swanned off down the brain drain to 
the US of A to find fame and fortune. 

With the Amiga and the ST, 
Europe is finding itself in a rather 
ironic situation - we're nicking the 
best the States has to offer! 

Consider the facts: in 1985, the 
dominant machines over here were 
the Speccy and 64. In America, Atari 
and Commodore were preparing to 
launch their 16 bit supermachines 
on an unsuspecting world. 

To start with, Europe were the 
poor relations. We gaped at the 
graphics and gasped at the games, 
but the machines were in very short 
supply; ait the software dribbled over 
the Atlantic when they could spare it, 



and then at extortionate prices. 

But now it's all changed. The ST 
largely flopped in America, and the 
Amiga has virtually become a 
specialist graphics workstation. But 
over here they're flourishing: there 
are probably more STs in the UK 
than in the States, and Commodore 
dominates the German and 
Scandinavian markets totally. 

What does all this mean? It 
means more software for us, better 
support, better supplies and lower 
prices, because at long last 
programmers over here are getting 
to grips with the machines. 
Electronic Arts have released Fusion, 
their first all-UK game, this month. 

With a worldwide user base of 
over a million between them, the 
future for the ST and Amiga looks 
pretty rosy. And that can't be bad. 




MUSIC 



[6 



YOURSELF! 



A 



C= 



Make money from your music - Chris Jenkins 
explains how to record your compositions, and 
who's out there just aching to buy what you do. 



TECHNOPHILE 



AMIGA TOOLS 



Reviews of CygnusEd Professional and W-Shell - 
two tools which aim to revolutionise your 
Amiga's programming environment. 

LEARN BASIC 



Part 4 of our teach-yourself series gets to grips 
with serious data handing - arrays and more. 

DESKTOP 



Entry forbidden to all Amiga owners - here's 
where the ST's innermost secrets are revealed. 

WORKBENCH 



Strictly not for ST owners - icons, CLI com- 
mands and a host of uniquely useful tips. 




Devpac Amiga Version 2 

The Best just got Better! 

Devpac Amiga has always been the popular choice for assembly language programming on your 

Commodore Amiga. When it passed its second birthday we took afresh look at it and realised there were a 

few things it didn't do that we, and you, wanted it to. So we rewrote both the assembler and debugger 

totally from scratch, allowing us to add features that were not possible in the original versions. We then 

substantially improved the editor as well to give us an unbeatable combination of features - see the table. 

The Editor - true integration 

The fast editor is based on the original but with extras like block 
highlighting, a file requestor and the ability to make backups of 
your source files. The assembler and debugger are both available, 
instantly, at the press of a key. 



The Assembler - no waiting zone 

GenAM was always fast but the all-new algorithms means it's 
even faster, particularly on larger programs. It handles multi- 
hunk code, 1 27-character significant labels, local labels, 
improved macros & conditionals, generates directly executable, 
or linkable code, and a stand-alone version is included so you can 
use a CLI, a batch file or an alternative editor. 

The Debugger - kills bugs, dead 

How many times do you write a completely bug- free program? 
Trying to debug a program by looking at guru numbers is what 
some development systems Jeave you to do. We include a 
disassemblcr/monitor/debugger called MonAM, which uses its 
own screen display, leaving your program's output alone. It has 
a range of different types of breakpoints including count and 
conditional breakpoints. For example you can stop after the 24th 
call to print or stop if the contents of mem_ptr become odd. You 
can also break into runaway programs, or you can even view your 
source-code files from within the debugger and use multi-hunk 
program symbols. 

Ideal for Beginners & Enthusiasts 

The editor is fast and easy to use, you can assemble from memory 
to memory then execute it repeatedly to try your ideas out, all 
without a disk access. Press a key and you're straight into the 
debugger, you can even debug programs assembled to memory 
with their original symbols. No linking is required - the assembler 
can generate directly executable programs immediately. 
Interested in hacking somebody else's code, such as the ROM? - 
with the debugger you can disassemble to disk with automatic 
labels, including system calls. AD programs will work on a 60- 
column display. 

Ideal for Professionals 

If you're not using Devpac for software development then you'd 
better hope that your rivals aren't either. Why wait for your editor 
to load a file or for your assembler to churn through it - GenAM 
is the fastest professional assembler available and is fully source 
code compatible with the MCC assembler. We write in 68000 
assembly language every day so we understand what you need. 

Ideal for You 

Just compare the specification with any other 
product and we're sure you'll agree 

Devpac Amiga 2 - There is No Competition 



High Quality Software 



The Old School, Greenfield, 
Bedford MK45 5DB 
Tel: (0525) 718181 




TWIST 

HiSoft BASIC @ £79.95 

Power BASIC @ £49.95 

Aztec C Professional @ £1 29 

Aztec C Developer @ £1 79 

DevpacST version 2 @ £59.95 

Personal Pascal 2 @ £79.95 

FTL Modula-2 @ £69.95 

Saved! @ £29.95 

Wercs resource editor @ £29.95 

TurboST the software blitter @ £39.95 

prices include P&P and VAT 



□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 



Screen Editor 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Handles tabs as single chars 


Y 


N 


N 


Y 


Step through assembly errors 


Y 


N 


N 


Y 


Automatic backups 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


Integrated assembler 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Integrated debugger 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Macro parameters 


10 


10 


9 


36 


Multi-line macro calls 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


Conditional assembly 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Case flexible 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Local labels 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


Executable, relocatable code 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Linkable code 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Multi-SECTIONs 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


INCLUDE binary flies 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


Assemble to memory 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Stand-alone assembler 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Section types 


Y 


N 


N 


Y 


Debugger supplied 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Disassembler 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Multi-window 


N 


n/a 


N 


Y 


Source-code viewing 


N 


n/a 


Y 


Y 


Single-step 


Y 


n/a 


Y 


Y 


Breakpoints 


Y 


n/a 


Y 


Y 


Conditional breakpoints 


N 


n/a 


N 


Y 


Full expression evaluator 


N 


n/a 


N 


Y 


Multi -screen 


Y 


n/a 


N 


Y 


Break into running programs 


Y 


n/a 


N 


Y 


Disassemble to disk 


N 


n/a 


N 


Y 


Example program source code 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Operating System libraries 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Version 


1.2 


11 


1 


2.0 





Please send me the following for my Amiga: 
HiSoft Devpac 2 @ £59.95 □ 

Aztec C Developer @ £1 79.00 □ 

Please send me the following for my Atari ST: 
@ £39.95 □ 



1 




I would like to pay by: □ Access □ Visa □ Cheque/PO 
Credit Card No: 



L 



Expiry Date: 



Signature: 



rj 




THE& 

PERSONAL 

COMPUTER 

SHOW 

-18SEPTEMBEF 



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_ The PC Show 1988 - spot 
the Atari and Commodore vil- 
lages; the Microprose super- 
shuttle taking off for a trip 
through space (boy, the 
queues for that, but it was 
worth it!}; the Future Publishing 
stand thronging with readers; 
and the latest manifestation of 
Atari's Abaq, the mega-Mip 
transputer farm known in the 
trade as 'The Microwave'. 



PC SHOW BRINGS 'EM IN 

The 1988 Personal Computer (PC) Show duly came and went at Earls Court, running from 14th to 18th 
September. ST Amiga Format were there in force, both manning our stand to meet you lot, and sniffing out 
the newest product announcements. 



Desktop Video 
for Amiga 

Commodore are to release a 
video editing kit later this year, 
based around the Amiga A500 
and priced at below £500. 

At last the potential of the 
Amiga's graphics hardware looks 
set to be realised, and with over a 
million video recorders in homes 
around the UK this could be a win- 
ning marketing strategy for 
Commodore. 

The idea is that you can link 
up your Amiga to a domestic 
video recorder and use it to edit 
and mix in computer graphics with 
conventionally recorded images. 
Applications range from adding 
captions and labels to granny on 
holiday, right up to directing your 
own pop video. 

Until now you needed to buy a 
special piece of hardware called a 
'Genlock' at around £200 to make 
the Amiga-video recorder link 
work, but Commodore have 
worked out a cheap deal with 
Applied Systems and Peripherals 
to build a suitable unit. 

Software bundled in the kit 
will be Zuma's TV Show and TV 
Text Barry Thurston, Sales 
Director at Commodore, reckons 
the price of this will be £499-ish, 
which looks pretty good value. 

Record companies of the 



world can now cringe at the 
prospect of receiving promo 
videos alongside demo tapes! 

16-bit shock! 

Mmmm! Listen to this for a spec 
for a brand new price-busting-per- 
formance-searing 16-bit wonder- 
machine: 

■ 512K of RAM expandable to a 
massive 640K maximum 

■ Speaker with volume control, 
capable of producing both quiet 
beeps and loud beeps (one tone 
only) 

■ Two expansion slots 

■ Standard graphics mode dis- 
play has a dazzling 4 colours 

■ Price with colour monitor: a 
snip at £573.85 inc. VAT 



"What can this be?" you ask, 
getting out your chequebook and 
setting off to place your order at 
Dixons. Answer: the new Sinclair 
Professional PC200, from 
Amstrad, only available at Comet. 

The idea is that an IBM com- 
patible games machine will appeal 
across the spectrum (ho, ho) of 
business and leisure users, thus 
selling in millions. Until now, every- 
thing Alan Sugar has done has 
turned to gold. Could this be his 
first mistake? 

After all, even if you run your 
computer through a TV and do 
without the monitor the PC200 
costs £299 plus VAT: that's 
£44.85 more than a list price ST, 
and £55.15 less than a list price 
Amiga. And you can usually find 




discounted STs and Amigas, 
whereas Amstrad models almost 
invariably stick to their list price. 

In short, no regrets for recent 
ST or Amiga buyers. The sad 
thing is that Amstrad's slick mar- 
keting campaign which will 
undoubtedly run up to Christmas 
may well lead some people into a 
serious mistake. 

ST cut official 

As revealed way back in issue 3 
of Format, Atari used the Show to 
announce a price cut of £100 on 
the ST. 

A basic 520ST with a 1MB 
disk drive (this larger size is the 
only one now available) is down to 
£299, and there's also the 'Super 
Pack' at £399. This consists of a 
520ST bundled with what claims 
to be £450 worth of software. 
The final 22 titles chosen by Atari 
are: Marble Madness, Test Drive, 
Beyond the Ice Palace, Buggy 
Boy, Eddie Edwards Super Ski, 
Ikari Warriors, Thundercats, 
Ranarama, Zynaps, Quadralien, 
Starquake, Chopper X, 
Roadwars, Xenon, Arkanoid II, 
Wizball, Black Lamp, Genesis, 
Thrust Seconds Out, Summer 
Olympiad 88, and one non-game 
package, Triangle's Organiser - a 
notepad/diary utility. 

Other ST models - 1040 and 
Megas - aren't changing in price, 

FORMAT ■ 1 




NEWS 



but then they didn't go up when 
the 520 rose last Spring. 
However, the 1040 is now coming 
with a built-in TV modulator as 
standard, worth £30 at old prices. 
Atari reckon there are 
120,000 STs in the UK at present, 
and aim to make that 200,000 by 
Christmas - think big, guys. 

Amiga push 

Commodore have been unable to 
respond in kind to Atari's price 
cut. After all, they did knock £100 
off the Amiga only few months 
back. However, the incentive to 
Autumn buyers is that all Amigas 
sold from November 1 st will 
include a free TV modulator - the 
widget that used to cost £24.99 
that was necessary to link up to a 
TV. 

Commodore's boss Steve 
Franklin admitted that they had 
thought of doing a games soft- 
ware deal. However, the eco- 
nomics would have pushed the 
A500 over £400. "We'd rather 
keep the price of the A500 down 
than include a deal with probably 
only two or three really good 
titles," he said. 

Joy for Amiga 
programmers 

HiSoft, that prolific source of joy 
to programmers, have begun to 
assault the Amiga market in a big 
way. 

Best news is of a compiler for 
Amiga BASIC. Due out around the 
end of October, HiSoft Amiga 
BASIC will cost £99.95. It claims 
to compile both industry-standard 
Microsoft BASIC compatible pro- 
grams and ordinary Amiga BASIC 
programs unchanged. 

HiSoft BASIC includes an inter- 
active editor, so you are immedi- 
ately returned to the correct point 
in a program when an error is dis- 
covered, and programs can be 
compiled to complete stand-alone 
machine code. Not only will they 
be faster than the standard inter- 
preter, you'l be able to sell your 
creations as a single clickable 
icon. 



Also due out, for the more 
inveterate hacker, is Devpac 2 for 
the Amiga. Version 2, which was 
released on the ST a couple of 
months ago (see issue 2) comes 
at £59.95 and features a com- 
pletely integrated edit-link-debug 
cycle. 

■ Hisoft, The Old School, 
Greenfield, Bedford (0525 
718181) 

Animators' 
delight 

The Amiga's pre-eminence in com- 
puter animation and interactive 
video continues to grow with sev- 
eral new products. 

Top of the range is Sculpt 4D 
Professional. At £368.00 inc VAT 
this is a professional ray-tracing 
package with a feature list as long 
as your arm: a protractor for mea- 
suring angles; keystroke macros; 
metal, glass and mirror textures; 
the omnipresent but obscure 
'Phong shading'; support for 
68020/030 processors; genlock 
interface, and much more. Anyone 
who's used to Sculpt 3D will know 
the quality to expect from the new 
version. 

Forms in Flight 2 (£79.00) 
and Fantavision (£39) are two bud- 
get-priced packages. As well as 
the usual animation features, F-in-F 
allows you to do texture mapping' 
- wrapping an IFF picture around a 
3-D shape; Fantavision is an 
Aegis Animator-basher, claiming 
much the same facilities at half 
the price. 

■ Amiga Centre Scotland, 4 Hart 
Street Lane, Edinburgh EH1 3RN 
(031-557 4242) 

Public service 

If you're bewildered by the vast 
number of Amiga PD disks out 
there, George Thompson 
Associates are providing what 
looks to be a good way of finding 
your feet. 

For £4.99 you can get two 
disks with a complete catalogue 
of Amiga public domain, covering 
the Fish. Amicus, FAUG and TBAG 
libraries, as well as a few special 



~._^_ 


Top of the charts 




Mandarin Software's ST games designer, 


■h~ ' y0i " — M ^ 


STOS, has achieved a unique first in the 


fi^^mt* 


heady annals of software history by being 
the first non-game to top the Gallup sales 




charts. 

Imagine what you'd think if on Top of 
the Pops next week Debussy went straight 


%:.** 


in at number one with his latest symphony. 
(OK, so he's dead...) STOS, coincidentally 
also a French-originated piece but other- 


$f 


wise unrelated, topped the Gallup ST sales 


charts after only its firs 


t week in the shops. It outsold all games, dis- 


^■w5ItffiTilfli73STiiilCwjfi*Kil 


the previous week's best seller. 



QUICKIES 

■ The ST Club are expanding - as well as moving premises to 
Sutton Place, 49 Stoney Street, Nottingham NG1 1LX, they are mar- 
keting their first commercial product. Fontkit Plus costs £9.99 
(£8.49 for a double-density disk version) and allows you to edit all 
GEM or Degas screen and printer fonts. 

■ George Thompson Assoc-iates are releasing a tutorial book to 
sharpen your Amiga art skills. Professional Results with Deluxe 
Paint II is a hardback crammed full of hints and tips on basic art 
techniques, colour cycling, screen photography and more. Cost is 
£24.95, or £44.95 inclusive of two disks of examples and tutorials. 

■ Hi-Tension (0734 761159) have developed a neat little Amiga 
hack, allowing you to display 16 colours on your Amiga Workbench 
screen. The system takes up 30k of working memory, and comes 
with new Icon Editor and Preferences utilities. Price TBA... 


* 




1 
^ J 

SupraDrive ^m 


■ Frontier's new deal brings their Supra hard disks to the Amiga 

■ Frontier (0423 67140), longtime distributors of Supra hard disk 
drives for the ST, have now clinched the distribution deal for the 
Amiga Supra range too. 20MB, 30MB and 60MB drives are avail- 
able, the smallest at £649.95 (A500/A1000) and £629.95 (A2000). 



compilations. Also covered is a 
taster of the popular American 
magazine-on-a-disk, Jumpdisk, in 
the form of a back issues listing 
and a sample of its articles, hints, 
tips and programs. 

To whet your appetite, the cat- 
alogue pack includes a fully 
playable 3D Asteroids clone 
game, Orbital, complete with 3D 
specs. 

You also get a £5 voucher, 
redeemable against a purchase of 




Toucu-scestu rtSELf 



10 or more PD disks (normally £3 
each) - so you stand to make a 
net gain of lp on the deal! 
■ George Thompson Associates, 
Freepost, Dippen, Brodick, Arran, 
KA27 8BR (0770 82 234) 



Deeply touching 

EC Computers have developed a 
new way of using your ST. Throw 
the mouse away, just point to 
what you want with the new 
Touchscreen. 

Eagle's touchscreen is a 
transparent overlay which clips on 
the screen and plugs into the ST, 
after which pointing at an item on 
the screen is exactly equivalent to 
clicking the mouse button on it. 

The screen consists of two 
facing mylar sheets, with a very 
slight gap. When you touch it, an 
electrical connection between the 
sheets is made. 

The unit has a resolution of 
256 by 256, and retails for £399 
inc. VAT. You'll never quite match 
the mouse for pixel-accurate draw- 
ing ability, but Eagle reckon it will 
go down a storm with physically 
handicapped users, schools and 
dealers who need to give demon- 
strations to an eager audience. 
■ EC Computer Exhibition Centre 
pic, 2nd Floor, Glamorgan 
House, David Street, Cardiff CF1 
2EH (0222 390286) 



8 ■ FORMAT 



ofe 



AMIGA SPECIALISTS 



Unit 1, Willowsea Farm, Spout Lane North 
Stanwell Moor, Staines. Middx TW19 6BW 
Telephone: (0753) 682988 



See us at the Show: 

November 18-20 Commodore 

birthday computer show 

CELEBRATIONS 
ON STAND 105 

Novotel. London, W6 



G 



SOFTWARE LIST 



HOUSE 

Aaargh Melbourne House 

Adventure Con Set Electronic Arts 

Alien Syndrome Sotlek 

Annats o< Rome P S.S. 

Arcade Classics Rcbtek 

Arkanoid Discovery 

Armageddon Man Martck 

Army Moves Ocean 

Ante Fox Electronic Arts 

Badcat Rainbow Arts 

Balance ol Power Microsoft 

Barbarian Palace 

Bards Taie 1 Electronic Arts 

Bards Tale II Electronic Arts 

Bermuda Project Mirrorsoft 

Better Dead Than Alien Elektra 

Beyond The ice Palace Elite 

Biomc Commandos U.S Gold 

Black Lamp Firebird 

Blgc |ack Academy Microiliusions 

Bomb Jack Elite 

Bubble Bobble Firebird 

Bubble Ghost Ere Int. 

Buggy Boy Elite 

Carrier Command Rambird 

Championship Goli Gamestar 

Chessmaster 2000 Electronic Arts 

Chubby Gristle Grandslam 

City Defence Anco 

Coruption Rambird 

Crack Line: 

Craps Academy Microiliusions 

Crash Garret! Infogames 

Defender of the Crown . Mirrorsoft 

Deja Vu Mmdscape 

Division One Robtek 

Ebonstar Microiliusions 

ECQ Ocean 

Elf Tynesolt 

Emerald Mines Anco 

Empire... interstel 

Empire Strikes Back Domark 

Enlightenment Firebird 

Faery Tale Adventure Microiliusions 

Ferran Formula One Electronic Arts 

Fire and Forget Titus 

Fireb ! aster Prism 

Firepower Microiliusions 

Flight Simulator II Sublogic 

Football Manager II Addictive 

Formula Grand Pnx Microvalue 

Fortress Underground ANCO 

Garrison II Rainbow Arts 

Gee Bee Air Rally Acti vision 

Gettysburg S.S.!. 

Giganoid S.C.A 

ice Hockey Mmdscape 

ikan Warriors Elite 

Interceptor Electronic Arts 

Indion i<ingsolt 

Jet Sublogic 

Jinx Rainbow Arts 

Kampigruppe S.S.I. 

King ol Chicago Mirrorsoft 

Leatherneck Microdeal 

Lealherr.eck 4 Player Adpt Microdeal 

Legend ol the Sword Rambird 

Ma.or Motion .. Micrcdeal 

Marble Madness Electronic Arts 

Mean 18 Accolade 

Menace PsygnosiS 

Mmd F;ghter Abstract 

Mind Forever Voyaging Inlocom 

Moon Mist intocom 

Mortvslle Manor Lencore 

Obfiterator Psygnosis 

Othello Robtek 

Pandora Firebird 

Passengers on the Wind .... Glenei 

Phalanx ll Anco 

Phantasie III S.S.I. 

Pinbail Wizard Kmgsoft 

Platoon Ocean 

Plunded Hearts Infocom 

Pcoi Mastertronic 

Ports of Call Aegis 

Powerplay Arcana 

Protector Prism 

Ouadrahen Logotron 

Red October Argus Press 

Return to Atlantis Electronic Arts 

Return to Genesis Firebird 

Rockford Melbourne House 

Rolling Thunder U.S Gold 

Romanic Encounters M croiiiusions 

S.D.t Mmdcraft 

Sacrophaser Players 

Scenery Disc 11 Sublogic 

Scenery Disk 7 , Sublogic 

Scenery Disc Europe Sublogic 

Scenery Disc Japan Sublogic 

Scrabble Deluxe Lesiure Genius 

Sentinel Firebird 

Seven Cmes ol Gold Electronic Arts 

Shadowgate Mmdscape 

Sidewinder Masiertronic 

Smbad and Thrcne Falcon . Mmdscape 

Skychase Imagworks 

Skyfo* If Electronic Arts 

Space Quest Sierra 

Space Station Prism 

Star Wars Domark 

Starlleet 1 ... Interstel 



S.S.P. OUR PRICE 



19.99 


3.50 


29.99 20.50 


24.99 


6.50 


2499 


6.50 


19.99 


3.50 


26.00 


6.00 


1 9.99 


4.50 


24 99 


6.50 


24 99 


750 


19.99 


6.00 


29.99 


9.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


7.50 


24.99 


7.50 


24.99 


6.50 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


9.50 


19.99 


3.50 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


19.99 


3.50 


19 99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


6.50 


34.99 


'7.75 


24.99 


7.50 


19.99 


3.50 


14.95 


0.25 


24.99 


6.50 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


6.50 


29.95 


9.50 


29.99 


9.50 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


6.50 


14.99 


0.25 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


7.50 


1999 


3.50 


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3.50 


49.99 


32.50 


24.99 


7.50 


24.99 


6.50 


9.99 


7.00 


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6.50 


39.95 


26.50 


19.99 


3.50 


14 95 


0.25 


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24.99 


9.50 


19.99 


3.50 


29.99 


>2.50 


14.95 


0.25 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


7.50 


19.99 


3.50 


39.99 


56.50 


24.99 


950 


29.99 


?2.50 


29.99 


9.50 


19.99 


3.50 


5.95 


4 50 


24.99 


6.50 


19.99 


3.50 


19.99 


4.50 


24.99 


7.50 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


29.99 


9.50 


29.99 


9.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


6.50 


9.99 


7.00 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


6.50 


14.99 


025 


24.99 


9.50 


9.99 


7.00 


24.99 


6.50 


29.99 


17.50 


9.99 


7.00 


39.99 


25.50 


19.99 


3.50 


9.99 


7 00 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


6.50 


24.99 


750 


19.99 


3.50 


19.99 


3. 50 


24.99 


9. 50 


24.99 


6.50 


29.99 


9.50 


14.99 


0.25 


19.99 


3.50 


19.99 


3.50 


19.99 


3.50 


19.99 


3.50 


1999 


3.50 


19.99 


3 50 


14.99 


0.25 


24.99 


6.50 


9.99 


7.00 


23.99 


9.50 


19.99 


3.50 


24.93 


7.50 


29.99 


950 


9.99 


7.00 


19.99 


3.50 


24.99 


7.50 



Starray Logotron 24.99 16.50 

Stir Crazy Bobo Infogrames 19.99 13.50 

Slock Market Tynesort 19.99 13.50 

Street Gang Players 14.99 10 25 

Street Fighter US Gold 24.99 19.50 

Strike Force Harrier Mirrorsoft 24 99 1 6.50 

Strip Poker II Anco 14.99 10.25 

Strip Poke' Data Disc 1 ... . Anco 9.99 7.00 

Sub Battle Simulator Epyx 24.99 19.50 

Summer Olympiad Tynesort 19.99 13.50 

Swooper Robtek 19.99 13.50 

Tanglewood Microdeal 1999 13.50 

Temple of Apsha; U.S. Gold 24.99 19.50 

Terrapods Psygnosis 24.99 16.50 

The Jewels ol Darkness .... Rambird 19 99 13.50 

Thexter Sierra 24.99 16 50 

Three Stooges Mirrorsoft 29 99 19.50 

Tnunaercats Etile 24.99 16 50 

Time and Magic Level 9 19.95 13.50 

Time Bandits Microdeal 19.99 13.50 

Tracers Miroillusions 24.99 16.50 

Ultima III Origin 24.99 16.50 

Ultima IV.... Origin 24.99 16.50 

Univiled Mind.scapc 2999 19.50 

Vectorball Masiertronics 24.99 16.50 

Vyper Topdown 14.99 10.25 

Warzonc ..Prism 9.99 7 00 

Whirligig Firebird 19.99 1350 

Winter Olympiad Tynesofl 19.00 13.50 

Witness Infocom 29.99 19.50 

Wizzball Ocean 24.99 16.50 

World Dans Masiertronics 14.95 10.25 

World Tour Golf Electronic Arts 24.99 17.50 

Xenon Melbourne House 19.99 13 50 

Zoom Discovery 19.99 13.50 

Virus Firebird 19 99 13.50 



- YOU CANT SEE IT ON THE LIST THEN PLEASE ASK 
WE CANT LIST EVERYTHING AVAILABLE 



Starglider II Rambird 24.99 16.50 

Zynaps Hewson 19.99 13.50 

Capone Actionware 29.99 1950 

P O.W Actionware 29.99 19.50 

Around the World in 90 day Pandora 1 9.99 1 3.50 

Fusion Electronic Arts 24.99 17.50 

Sargon III Chess Logotron 2d.99 16.50 

Motorbike Madness Mastertromc 14.99 10.25 

Revenge of Mutant Camels Masterlronic 9.99 7.00 

Olf Shore Warrior Titus 24 99 16.50 

Lancelot Level 9 19.99 13.50 

^LJJI.H.JJJ,.^!HMJll:I.IJ!lJ ; „.|Jf!TR» 



TI TLE 



Alien Strike 

8atileships 

Black Shadow 

Blastbali 

Borrowed Time . 

Brainstorm 

Casino Roulette 

Cougans Run 

Diablo 

Eagles Nest 

Extensor 

Eye 

Feud 

Flmtstones 

Footman 

Frostbyte 

Galactic Invasion . 

Goldrunner 

Jump Jet . 

Karate Kid II 

Kwasimodo 

Leviathan 

Mach3 

Mindshadow 

Mission Elevator 

Moebius 

Ogre 

Pmk Panther 

Plutos 

Power Struggle 

Q Ball 

Roadwars 

Rockey 

Rolling Thunder 

Seconds Out 

Silicon Dreams . . . 

Slaygon 

Space Port 

Starways 

Strange New World 

Tass Times 

Terramex 

Tetns 

Thunder Boy . 

Vampire Empire 

Wall 

Western Games . 



HOUSE 

.. Diamond 
.Elite 
.C.R.L 

Masiertronics 
. Activision 
. Roblek 
.C.D.S 

Softgang 
. Roblek 

Pandora 

Players 
. Endurance 
. Masterlronics 
.Grand Slam 
..Topdown 

Microvalue 

Microiliusions 
..Microdeal 
. Anco 
. Microdeal 
. Robtek 

English 
.. LoncielS 
.. Aci'vison 
. Relme 
. Origin 
. Origin 
. Magic Bytes 
. Masterlronics 
. P.S.S. 

English 
..Melbourne House 

Roblek 
..U.S Gold 

Tynesofl 

Rambird 

Microdeal 
.. Rehne 

Robtek 

Timewarp 
. Acivision 

G.S.E. 

Mirrorsoft 

"^mewarp 

Mage Bytes 
.. Timwarp 
. Magic Bytes 



S.S.P OUR PRIC E 



2499 
19.99 
24.99 

9.99 
24.99 

9.99 
19.99 
14.99 
19.99 



9.99 
14.95 

9.99 
19 99 
24.99 
14.99 
24.99 
24.99 
14.99 
24.99 

9.99 
19.99 
19.99 
29.99 
19.99 
24.99 
24.99 
19.99 
14.99 
14.99 
1999 
19.99 

9.99 
24.99 
19.99 
19 99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
19.99 
29.99 
19.99 
19.99 
14.99 
19.99 
14.99 
19.99 



15.50 
12.50 
15.50 

5.50 
15.50 

5.50 
12.50 

9.00 
12.50 
12.50 

5.50 

9.00 

5.50 
12.50 
15 50 

9.00 
15.50 
15.50 

9.00 
15.50 

5.50 
12 50 
12.50 
12.00 
12 50 
15.50 
15.50 
12.50 

9.00 

9.00 
12.50 
12.50 

5.50 
15.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.00 
12.50 
12.50 

9.00 
12.50 

9.00 
12.50 



IDLE 



PLEASE CHECK AVAILABILITY ON 
SPECIAL OFFER PRODUCTS 

UttmmUMB 

HOUSE S.S.P. 



A. C. .Basic 

Adrum 

Animator images 

Art Pahs 1 

Arts Parts II 

Animator Apprentice 
Animator apprentice Junior 

Audiomaster 

Award Maker 
Aztec C Professional 

Butcher 

C. Library 

Calligrapher 

CLI Mate 

Data Retrive 

Deluxe Music Con Set 

Deluxe Paml II 

Deluxe Phoiolab 

Deluxe Print 

Deluxe Productions 

Deluxe Video 

Devpac Assembler 

Diga 

Digipainl 

Digiview 3.0 

Digiview Adapter 

Director 

Dos 2 Dos 



Absott 
Bullfrog 
Aeg-s 

Electronic Arts 
Electronic Arts 



Eagle Tree 
Benchmark 
interactive 
Interactive 



Electronic Aris 

Electronic Arts 

Electronic Arts 

Electronic Arts 

Electronic Arts 

Electronic Arts 

Hi soft 

Aegis 

Newtek 

Newlek 

Newtek 

The Righl Answor 59.95 

Central Coast 39.95 



39.95 

129.95 
9.99 
9.99 

199.95 
59.99 
46.00 
39.99 

199 59 
29.99 
79.99 
69.99 
39.99 
57.99 
69.95 
6999 
69.99 
24.95 

139.99 
69.99 
59.95 
57.50 
59.95 

1 49.99 
22.95 



132.50 
32.50 

105.00 
7.50 
7,50 

132.50 
42 50 
32.00 
29.50 

132.50 
21.50 
60.50 
50.50 
29.50 
42.50 
50.50 
50.50 
39 50 
18.50 

115.00 
50.50 
45.50 
42.50 
42.50 

105.00 
19.50 
45.50 
23.95 



Express Paint P.A.R 

Face II 

Forms In Flight 

Fuiuresound .. .. Applied Visions 

Goldspell 2 

Comp 2.0 

G'abbiu Discovery 

Ha> Calac Haitex 

Hot and Cool Jazz Electronic Arts 

I.F.F. Library Benchmark 

impact Aegis 

Instant MuSiC Electronic Arts 

Interchange 

Intro Cad P.S.S. 

K Spread 2 

K Seka Assembler Kuma 

Kara Fonts Kara 

Kind Words Disc Company 

Lattice C4.0 Lattice 

Lattice C Proffesiona." De. Version 



/ICC. Pascal 
Macro Assembler 

Marauder II 

Maxiplan A500 . . 

Maxiplan Plus 

Microfiche Filer .. 
Mcduia N .. 
Music Studio . 



..Metacomco 
Metacomco 
Discovery 

Ok xi 

. Ox m 

.SV 

Benchrrmik 

.. Activt! 



;on 



On Line M S.S. 

Page Flipper 
Perfect Sound 

Photon Paint Microillusms 

Pixmate P.P.S 

Powerwindows 2 

Prism Impulse 

Pro Board Prolific 

Pro Net Prolilic 

Pro Sound Designer Eldorsoft 

Pro Video J D.K Images 

Prolession.al Page Cold Disc 

Publisher Plus ." North Easl 

Rock and Roll Electronic Arts 

Ruby View Term 

Sculpt 3D Byle by Byle 

Sculpt 3D Animate Byte by Bytye 

Seasons and Holidays Electronic Art 

Snakespear Infinity 



Shell 

Simp Library 

Sonix 

Superbase 

Super Base Profe* 

TV. Show 

T.VText 

Tool Kit 

Turbo Silver 

Video Tttler I i 

Videoscape 3D 

WordPerfect 4.1 

X Cad 

Zuma Fonts 

Zuma Fonts 2 

Zuma Fonts 3 

Excellence 



Metacomco 
. Benchmark 

Aegis 

Presision 

precision 

Zuma 
.Zuma 

Metacomco 
. Impulse 
. Aegis 
. Aegis 

Word Perfect 

Zuma 
.Zuma 
.Zuma 

V -JDsySiems 



69.95 

29 99 

69 95 

175.00 

29.95 

29.99 

29 95 

5999 

9 99 

79 99 

63 99 

29.95 

49.99 

59.99 

7999 

49.95 

59.95 

49.99 

172.50 

275.00 

89.95 

69.99 

39.99 

99 99 

149.99 

79.95 

139 00 

34.99 

110.46 

120.00 

79.99 

69 99 

49 95 

69 99 

59.95 

47500 

475.00 

7999 

24995 

249 00 

99.50 

999 

99 99 

85.00 

129.95 

9.95 

129.95 

49.95 

79.99 

57 50 

6995 

249.00 

69.99 

69.99 

3995 

139.95 

110.00 

143.75 

228 85 

460.00 

34.95 

34.95 

3495 

199.99 



50.50 
21 .50 

50.50 
155 00 
21.50 
21.50 
21.50 
42.50 
7.50 
60 50 
44.50 
21.50 
39.50 
42 50 
60.50 
32.50 
45.50 
32.50 
122 50 
205.00 
69 50 
4950 
29 50 
72.50 
102.50 
62.50 
102.00 
24.50 
93 50 
99.80 
60.50 
50.50 
39 50 
50 50 
45.50 
375 00 
375.00 
60.50 
17550 
175.00 
72.50 
7.50 
72.50 
65.50 
105.00 
7 50 
85.00 
34.50 
60 50 
39.50 
72.50 
185.00 
50.50 
50.50 
29.95 
115.00 
85.50 
110 00 
1 75.50 
325.00 
24.50 
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135.00 



FAN TA VISION NOW AVAILABLE SUPERB SOUND AND ANIMATION 
PACKAGE JUST IN FROM AMERICA 
S.S.P. E39.99 OUR PRICE ONLY 29.50 

Lights. Camera. Action 57 99 39.50 

Comic Setter Gold Disk 69 99 50.50 

Chips Art Library Disk for come setter 24.99 1 8.50 

HARDWARE LIST AS FROM THE 1ST OCTOBER 1989 

A500 Computer (Built-in Disk 3 1,2' disk drive. Amiga DOS kckstart. 

Workbench. 1 .2. the very first) 399.99 350.00 

A5C0 (As Above) with 1084 Colour Monitor 699.99 620.00 

A500 Business Pack 803 85 750.00 

A500. 1084 Colour Monitor and AF880 705.99 665.00 

AF880 (OnOtl switch thru port) Disk Drive 1 10 00 95.00 

MPS 1 200C Disk Drive 1 40.99 1 25 50 

1084 Colour Monitor 349 99 290.00 

1084 Colour Monitor & T V. Tunder 305 99 287.00 

T.V. Tuner 99.99 91.50 

Cumana Amiga Drive CAX 354 99 99 91 .50 

Cumana Amiga Drive INC P. S.U. CAS 354 150.99 125.00 

Amiga Genclock [A5C01 299.99 260 00 

RF302C Slimline Amiga 2nd Drive 105.99 98.50 

A501 12MG RAM Upgrade 17599 150.00 

A200 (B) with 1084 Coiur Monitor 1 489.25 1 275.00 

A2000 (B) 178250 1439.00 
A2058 (8MB RAM Board- Populated 

with 2MB) 746.35 620.00 

A2088 XT Bndgeboard 607 20 555.00 

A22B6 AT Bndgeboard 1148.85 995.00 

A3092 20MB MSDOS Hard Disk 402 50 375 00 

A2300 Internal A2CO0 Genlock 286.35 250.00 

A2010 Internal 3 1'2" Floppy Disk Drive 182.85 159.00 



A2024 Hi-Res Mono Monitor 764.75 701 .00 

A2620U Unix Card 1956.15 1755.00 

14" Cotron Hi Res Colour Monitor 747.50 650.00 

20" Coiron Hi-Res Colour Monitor 2070.00 1879.00 

Cherry PAD A3 Digitising Tablet 632.50 565.00 

Video Driver Card (Musi be Sold with Cotron) 396 75 350.00 

A2C0 SPECIAL OFFER (WHILST STOCKS LAST) 

A2C0B Computer with 1084 Colour Monitor 

and A20 Z "97 20MB Amiga Hard Disk 2241.35 1970 00 



PER 


PHERALS 






Disk Box (Holds 50 Disks) 




22.50 


10.50 


Disk Box (Holds 100 Disks) 




32.95 


13.50 


Clik Mouse Mai 






5.00 


Pro 5000 Joystick 




23.99 


14.50 


Ram Deita Joystick 




15.99 


950 


Speed Kings Joystick 




19.99 


12.50 


Alsop Universal Printer, Monitor Stand 


15.99 


9 50 


Citizen 120D Printer R.bbon 




9.99 


3.50 


10 Blark Disks with Box 




25.99 


13.50 


Disk Drive Head Cleaner 




14.99 


8.50 




NEWS 



Not-so-Mini 
Office II 

Mini Office II, the staggeringly suc- 
cessful budget software suite 
which has progressed from BBC 
through CPC, PCW and PC, is now 
arriving on platform 5 for the ST. 

Comprising a word processor, 
spreadsheets, database, comms 
suite and graphics editor, the con- 
fusingly named Database 
Software hope their other-formats 
success will be repeated. 

However, they seem to have 
abandoned the budget ground for 
a grander image. Past versions of 
Mini Office have cost £19.95 
(Amstrad CPC), £29.95 (Amstrad 
PCW), £49.95 (PC) - but the ST 
version will be £29.95 per mod- 
ule. That's £149.95 the lot! At 
£20 or so people are prepared to 
forgive a few bugs, but it's going 
to have to be good at £150. 
■ Database Software, Europa 
House, Adlington Park, Adlington, 
Macclesfield SK10 4NP (0625 
878888) 

The shows 
go on 

How many computer shows can 
you fit into one year? How many 
angels fit on the head of a pin? If 
you didn't make the PC Show, 



don't fret - shows for both ST and 
Amiga owners are scheduled for 
November, ideal for picking up 
those Christmas bargains. 

The 12th Official 

Commodore Show takes place at 
the Novotel, Hammersmith, 
between November 18th-20th, 
closely followed by the Atari 
Christmas Show at Alexandra 
Palace from November 25th-27th. 
Hardworking Database Exhibitions 
are organising them both, and 
hardworking journalists like our- 
selves (ermm...) will be among the 
crowds at both. 

Prime attraction at the Atari 
Show is a games workshop: if you 
fancy yourself as a games writer, 
this could be your chance to make 
a million. Write your program and 
take it along to the show, where 
reps from US Gold, 
Mastertronic/Virgin and Tynesoft 
will give you advice on design and 
presentation, or even make you 
an offer if its really good! 

Meanwhile Commodore are 
offering prizes in a Christmas 
Card design competition - take 
your disks along and win a prize - 
plus special graphics and games 
rooms with major demos running 
all the time. 

■ Database Exhibitions, Europa 
House, Adlington Park, Adlington, 



Macclesfield SK10 4NP (0625 
878888) 

Eeek! 
It's Mouse Music 

Eidersoft are setting out to prove 
that the ST can outplay an Amiga 
when it comes to sound sampling. 

Mouse Music, previewed at 
the PC Show, is a 4-Channel 
sound sampler and sequencer for 
the ST. You can get sampling 
rates of up to 44.1 kHz, which is 
the same as CD players use. It will 
take samples in 8-bit mode (below 
16-bit CD quality), but can replay 
in higher quality 12-bit mode. 
Eidersoft plan to supply a disk of 
1 2-bit samples for you to edit into 
your own pieces, but you can't 
directly sample at 12 bits. 

Mouse Music plugs into the 
cartridge port, and the software 
can optionally be fitted in ROM, 
freeing you from carrying disks 
around with you to live shows. 

Mouse music will be sold at 
£179, or a special deal with a key- 
board at £249. (A keyboard for 
£70 doesn't sound bad.) First 
sales are planned for the Atari 
Show, November 25th-27th. 

Amiga owners needn't despair 
though - a version of Mouse 
Music is well under way, which will 
sample on eight channels! 




STEREO 

Digital 

Sampler 



■ Eidersoft's Mouse Music board 
in prototype form at the PC show 

m Eidersoft, Unit D7, Royal Mills, 
Esher, Surrey KT10 8AS (0800 
581 742) 




101 FORMAT 




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6 Challenging and 
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QUEUE FOR ACTION 



Bewildered by the billions of new games announced at the PC show? 
Andy Storer battled through the crowds to find the truth behind the 
hype, and presents the best of the month's upcoming games on ST and 

Amiga. 



LORDS OF THE 
RISING SUN 

Cinemaware/Mirrorsoft ■ 
Amiga & ST ■ £TBA 



INMMNKRit] 



The follow up to Defender of the 
Crown and Cinemaware's most 
ambitious project to date is a real- 
time arcade adventure set in 12th 
century Japan with you in com- 
mand of vast armies of Samurai 
taking on Ninjas in an all-or-nothing 
attempt to become Shogun. As 
you might expect, the interactive 
graphics and animation are going 
to be out of this world. 

PIONEER 
PLAGUE 

Mandarin ■ Amiga only ■ 
£19.95 

Proudly announced as the world's 
first 4,000 colour mode game', 
Pioneer is the only game to date 
developed using the Amiga's 
'HAM' graphics capability and 
comprises eight directional 
scrolling, digitised speech and 
stereo music. You're after a self- 
replicating, terraforming robotic 
probe that's got its wires crossed 
in a mix of multi-level arcade/strat- 
egy. The hyper-fast fractal 
sequences have to be seen to be 
believed. 



DAMOCLES 

Novagen ■ ST & Amiga ■ 
£TBA 

Despite rumours that the '88 PC 
Show demo was no different from 
the one of '87, the follow up to 
Mercenary will be out by Xmas. 
Really. After leaving Targ you 
make it to the Gamma planetary 
system where the comet 
Damocles is about to wreak 
havoc. And yes, it's up to you to 
avert disaster. Reputedly with 50 
times more data than its prede- 
cessor, Damocles features fast 
solid 3D graphics. 

AFTERBURNER 

Mediagenic ■ ST & Amiga ■ 
£24.99 

Argonaut's Starglider 2 team bring 
you this compressed clone after 
stripping down the 3 Megabytes 
of the number one arcade game 
of the year to deliver a fast and 
furious 3D assault. Throw in 
stereo FX and you're left with a 
supersonic dogfight that aims to 
capture the thrills and spills of the 
original. Can you believe it's also 
out on the Spectrum? 




I AFTERBURNER 




I PIONEER PLAGUE 
12 ■ FORMAT 



ROCKET 
RANGER 

Cinemaware/Mirrorsoft ■ 
Amiga only ■ £29.99 

It sounds like a Sunday Sport 
story: the Nazis win World War 
Two, then hang out on the moon 
manufacturing deadly bombs. A 
bunch of scientists from the future 
send you a rocket suit, a ray gun 
and a secret decoder wheel in the 
mail, whereupon you set off to 
rescue your childhood sweetheart 
and her scientist father before 
heading for the moon. Wacky or 
what? Be prepared for something 
special with this red hot coin-op 
conversion - stunning arcade 
action and a varied plot. 



sions to complete against various 
MIGs. There'll also be a facility to 
challenge another pilot in machine 
to machine combat as you hit 
Mach 2 with a planeload of mis- 
siles, bombs and cannons. 




I FALCON 




■ ROCKET RANGER 

DRAGON- 
SLAYER 

Linel ■ Amiga &ST ■ £29.95 

A state of the art arcade adven- 
ture featuring over 300 locations 
in castles, forests and villages. It's 
pretty obvious from the title what 
your role is in the scenario - let's 
just say there's 50 different ene- 
mies some of whom occupy half 
the screen as a single sprite. And 
the animation we saw was some- 
thing really special - the Amiga 
version will display 80 colours 
throughout, another demonstra- 
tion that 16-bit horizons are being 
stretched. 

FALCON 

Spectrum Holobyte/Mirrorsoft 

■ Amiga & ST ■ £TBA 

/nterceptor-style 3D graphics com- 
bine with multiple views in a simu- 
lator where you'll have 12 mis- 



PACMANIA 

Grandslam ■ Amiga & ST ■ 
£19.95 

Grandslam's great coin-op conver- 
sion comes your way in 64 
colours with Pac Man himself in 
16 shades as he works his way 
through the 22 levels. Worth a 
look for nostalgia at least as this 
pioneering figure of computer 
entertainment guarantees his 
rightful place in the 20th century's 
archives. 










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FUTURES 




• ii ! ij-n» 





■ Many computer artists use programmatic, nonm 
Prue'ttt use mathematical procedures that dont yield 
prising and spectacular. Other artists prefer the j^ 
e and repeat images instantly. 



«tor< 



he ifrta 



The graphics capabilities of computers are advancing 
apace; and the uses for so-called superworkstations are 
many: video titling, animation, scientific research, CAD, 
DTP. Richard Monteiro looks at the machines creating 
pixel masterpieces and graphics grandeur. 



You'd be hard put to watch a 
day's TV without seeing some 
form of computer-generated 
art. Dozens of television adverts and 
programs use computer animation; 
travel agents, insurance brokers and 
estate agents use pixel pictures to 
display product information; some 
train stations and airports take advan- 
tage of computer graphics to inform 
travellers of arrival and departure 
times, gate numbers and other useful 
information. 

The story doesn't stop there. Far 
from it. Computer imagery reveals the 
invisible. Computer graphics enhance 
images grabbed by medical scanners 
so doctors can really see what's 
going on. Much more data is available 
to the geologist on a computer 
screen than a seismograph. A com- 
puter-generated car can be driven 
into a computer-generated wall and 
the results observed by engineers 
without the cost of any auto hard- 
ware. 

Early computers didn't have any 
graphics capabilities; output was gen- 
erally through teletype printers or, at 



most, oscilloscope-like devices. Such 
limitations didn't prevent program- 
mers from experimenting, however. In 
1950 an operator on the EDSAC 
(Electronic Delay Storage Automatic 
Computer) at Cambridge University 
produced an image of a Highland 
dancer on one of the computer's 
oscilloscopes. A few years later 
Christopher Strachey at Manchester 
University programmed a computer to 
play draughts on screen. Humble 
beginnings indeed for computer-gen- 
erated art. 

Machines making 
movies 

Perhaps the most-talked about, if not 
most-used, graphics system is 
Quantel's Paintbox. Several versions 
of this mega-system exist. The best 
known is Video Paintbox which is 
used by many television and video 
companies for generating real-time 
effects and superb introductory 
sequences. Cost for this system is 
betwen £80,000 and £100,000. Over 
500 systems exist worldwide; with 



the UK having a 10% share. The BBC 
alone has 25 systems. 

Graphics Paintbox is another of 
Quantel's babies; this one is used by 
the printing industry. It boasts an 
almost-infinite colour palette (colours 
can be mixed to produce new 
colours), resolution enough to create 
pictures of photograph quality and a 
£305,000 price tag. Unsurprisingly 
there aren't too many Graphics 
Paintboxes in the country - three or 
four according to Quantel. 

Ifs all custom silicon inside 
Paintboxes: Quantel aren't keen to 
divulge any information on what 
makes the systems tick. But you can 
bet it's circuitry is pretty hot. 

Technology like that afforded by 
Paintbox is constantly dropping in 
price. Silicon Graphics, for instance, 
manufacture a workstation by the 
uninspiring name of 4D/80GT. This 
machine boasts a 16.7 MHz RISC pro- 
cessor functioning at 13 MIPS, 
380Mbyte hard drive, 19" 1280 by 
1024 colour monitor and 8 Mbyte of 
memory. It runs Unix Version 3 with X- 
Windows and Sun's News windowing 



C O M P I T E R 



GRAPHICS 
EXHIBITION 

The 1988 Computer Graphics 
show is to be held at Wembley 
Exhibition Centre, London, 
between October 1 1th and 
13th. Show hours are from 
10am to 6pm except Thursday 
the 13th when opening times 
are from 10am to 4.30pm. All 
that is state-of-the-art in graph- 
ics is promised for display. 
Tickets cost £5 and are avail- 
able from Blenheim Online (01- 
868 4466). Under 18"s not 
admitted. 



G RAPHIC Sl 8 8 



FORMAT ■ 13 




MAD BASTARD 

Wired, C4's magazine follow- 
up to The Tube, has a 50-sec- 
ond introduction featuring a 
skeletal automaton crashing 
though a ghost town. 'Mad 
Bastard' is the name of the 
hell-raiser affectionately ani- 
mated by Digital Pictures. The 
budget for the title sequence 
was a mere £50,000. Bank 
adverts using computer anima- 
tion can cost half a million 
pounds. 



environment. The 4D/80GT 
allows users to design and 
manipulate complex, fully 
rendered and fully lit (ray- 
traced) images without the 
need for creating prelimi- 
nary wire-frame designs. 
This is achieved by a propri- 
etary graphics sub-system 
coupled to the processor - 
basically, it's one hell of a 
machine, and all for the 
merry fee of £68,000. 

Still too pricey? For 
£30,000 you can get hold 
of the Video Paint VP101 
system. Painting software, 
graphics tablet, anti-aliased 
fonts (curves don't appear 
jagged due to subtle colour 
shading), internal genlock 
and 40 Mbyte hard drive 
included. 

The next best thing to a 
graphics superworkstation 
- if you don't have several 
hundred thousand pounds 
spare - is an expansion 
card for your micro. 
Something like the Falcon Colour 
Card which features 256 colours on 
screen from a palette of 16.7 million, 
2Mbyte of memory, hardware pan 
and zoom, on-board firmware and 
HD64180 processor. Currently the 
board only interfaces to IBM PCs, but 
at around £3000 this probably isn't a 
worry for most home users. 

CIT based in West Germany have 
two graphic-expander boards for the 
Amiga. MegaVision 02 is available 
now and offers a one megabyte 
frame buffer, non-interlaced 800 by 
600 resolution (1024 by 760 inter- 
laced) and 256 colours on screen 




■ Researchers employ computer 
images to enter sub-microscopic 
realms, In scores of laboratories 
around the world computer monitors 
display multicoloured models of 
molecules. The models are clusters 
of hundreds of little balls, each of a 
particular size and colour to repre- 
sent certain atoms. Researches 
sometimes wear stereoscopic lenses 
to enhance the illusion of three 
dimensions. 



PIXEL BOOM FOR THE ST 

Elmtech Research's ParSec board (first announced four months 
ago) has had its specifications changed and according to David 
Encill, head of Elmtech, is "realistically three to four months away." 

A 32-bit, 40Mhz TMS 34010 processor (aka GSP - the Graphic 
System Processor) running at 6.125 MIPS (million instructions per 
second) is the heart of the machine. Based around Texas 
Instruments' SDB (Software Development Board), the ParSec will be 
offered in three versions: Colour+, Pixel+ and Text*. Colours will 
provide 1024 by 512 resolution, 4096-colour palette, 16 colours 
per line and 768k of VRAM (video RAM). PixeU will be an optional 
board for Colour + which boosts resolution to 1024 by 1024, pro- 
vides a 16,777, 216-colour palette, allows 256 colours per line and 
features 1.5Mbytes of VRAM. Text+ won't be capable of colour-pro- 
cessing as it is intended for professional word processing and DTP 
use. Software will be fitted internally on ROM. 

The unit will be housed in an extruded aluminium case, strong 
enough to support a monitor, with anodised front and rear panels. A 
multi-sync monitor is necessary to display the high resolutions on 
offer (another £500). The highest resolution will require an A4 
Megascreen costing a cool £1200. 

Several software packages are being written for ParSec includ- 
ing a CAD system, car and flight simulator, and a Quantel Paintbox- 
like program. The graphic package is claimed to offer better facili- 
ties than the Quantel system, including chalk, oil and water colour 
emulation, intelligent frame image filling and animation. 

ParSec will come with a SCSI interface and will have provision 
for expansion boards. Proposed expansion units include sound gen- 
eration, a Genlock, a video digitiser and a frame buffer. There's no 
definite price for the board, yet, but it's likely to be around the 
£600 mark. An Amiga model is planned. 



14 ■ FORMAT 



from a palette of 256,000. No design 
software exists for the system, but 
libraries are provided if you are inter- 
ested in developing your own soft- 
ware. Cost: around 3000 Deutsch- 
marks(£1000). 

Creative Age 2016 - ready real 
soon - is an A2000-only board with 
graphic processor running at 
20Megs, heaps of video RAM and the 
same colour capabilities as the 
Amiga. So what makes the thing so 
special? 1024 by 760 non-interlaced 
mode and the possibility of speeding 
up Amiga drawing routines by redi- 
recting vectors to the 2016. Price 
for this model is expected to be 
between 3000 and 4000 DM. Pay 
extra and you can will receive the 
same board with extra memory and 
better resolution. CIT can be contact- 
ed at Maaffenstr No. 10, 4235 
Schermbeck, West Germany {010 49 
28534099). 

And, of course, there's the oft- 
mentioned ParSec board. An ST ver- 
sion is due out first with an Amiga 
model following fast (more on the 
board elsewhere). 

Graphic 
techniques 

There are two fundamentals for creat- 
ing computer graphics: modelling and 
rendering. Modelling (wire-frame 
drawing) requires the artist or design- 
er to enter structural information: 
which lines join to particular points, 
where a sphere attaches to a cube, 




what radius is given to a circle. 
Rendering (filling) forces the comput- 
er to display the model complete with 
colours, textures and shading. 

Many wire-frame drawing pack- 
ages use the schoolchild technique of 
creating cubes: two squares are over- 
lapped, the corners joined with paral- 
lel lines and the edges normally hid- 
den by the front surface removed. A 
better method can be found in solid- 
modelling systems which are essen- 
tially wire-frame drawing programs 
with surface recognition and automat- 
ic hidden-line removal. Yet another 
method of producing models, con- 
structive solid geometry (CSG), works 
by having a set of basic objects. The 
user can build new shapes by adding 
several primitives together. The final 
step is to add colour and emphasize 
the object's three-dimensionality. 

Imitating the random quality of 
nature is possibly the most difficult 
task for computers to undertake. 
Flames, irregular branches of trees, 
fissures in mountains and swaying 
fields of corn are among the many 
items that solid-modelling programs 
haven't a hope of handling. Drawing 
each limb of an oak tree or every 
crack in a wall would consume far too 
much processor time - not to men- 
tion artist's time. Programs are avail- 
able for drawing trees and flames; 
these have pre-programmed images 
and simply spew them onto the 
screen according to the designer's 
directions. Realism is simulated by 
the program's in-built randomness. 




Credible computer-created land- 
scapes are possible thanks to the 
mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot, 
Fractal geometry - as his work is now 
called - is a technique for mathemati- 
cally building landscapes . and other 
natural-looking forms. Of course, 
semi-regular shapes that don't resem- 
ble anything on Earth are just as easi- 
ly produced. Captain Blood, the explo- 
ration game for ST and Amiga 
micros, uses Fractal mathematics to 
generate random planet landscapes. 

Ray tracing, a rendering proce- 
dure which evolved from software 
designed to determine how nuclear 
radiation passes through solid 
objects, arguably does more for a pic- 
ture's realism than any other process. 
Ray tracing programs imitate the intri- 
cate play of light on a scene by calcu- 
lating how countless individual rays 
are reflected from shiny surfaces, 
absorbed by dull ones, blocked by 
opaque objects and transmitted by 
transparent and translucent ones. 
Generating a ray-traced picture can 
take hours, even days, on even the 
most powerful workstation, but the 
results can be so realistic they are 
often mistaken for photographs. 



Pixels at work 

No matter what your TV-viewing taste, 
you're guaranteed to have seen some 
form of computer-created art. From 
the Death Dance of Mad Bastard in 
the opening sequence of Wired to the 
smooth scrolling titles of ITN's News 
at Ten; from the mixed computer 
graphics and live action of the Yoplait 
advertisement to the totally computer- 
generated Smarties advertisement; 
from the simple stills in Catch Phrase 
to the extravagant animations found 
in the latest Access adverts. 

Even the Amiga is used for creat- 
ing titles and other interesting effects 
for television programmes - like 
Network 7 and the Chart Show. 

Big-screen films also use comput- 
er graphics. Iron, for instance, was 
the first film to include over 15 min- 
utes of computer animation and a fur- 
ther 15 minutes of combined comput- 
er graphics and live action. Due to the 
huge amount of time needed to make 
the graphics sequences, the film went 
over budget; it's poor plot and weak 
characters ensured it wasn't a box- 
office smash. The Last Staritghter, 
which came later and consequently 
avoided many of the pitfalls of Iron, 



has 36,000 frames entirely 
generated by computer. A 
Cray X-MP (which costs 
around £10-million) - with 
painting software featuring a 
70 billion colour palette, mul- 
tiple light-source ray tracing, 
and rendering functions 
capable of introducing blem- 
ishes into objects - was 
used to achieve the realism. 
It still took it 2.5 minutes per 
frame, though! 

CAD is a fast-growing 
area that makes extensive 
use of silicon-created graph- 
ics. One particular group of 
architects in Chicago can 
stroll down Michigan Avenue 
without leaving their seats. 
Their computers generate a 
complete 3D model of Chicago by 
drawing from a massive database 
that includes the outer dimensions of 
every structure. CAD isn't just restrict- 
ed to wire-frame creations: comput- 
ers can generate a model finished in 
wood, brick, stone or marble - the 
correct colour and texture of the 
material will be displayed by the com- 
puter. 

Other areas where computer 
graphics play an important role 
include CAE (Computer-Aided 
Engineering), CAM {Computer-Aided 
Manufacture), DTP, simulators, satel- 
lite-data enhancing (weather maps, 
thermic maps and deep-space visu- 
als), analyzing digitised images of ath- 
letes, brain-scanning equipment and 
sub-microscopic research.* 



FUTURES 



LOADSA- 
COLOURS 

A computer's palette is deter- 
mined by the size of the 
machine's colour register. 
Register size is measured in 
binary bits. Hence a computer 
with an 8-bit colour register will 
have a palette of 256 colours 
(256 is the largest value that 
can be held in eight binary dig- 
its). The ST palette is 512 
colours and the Amiga's is 
4096 colours. Many worksta- 
tions offer a palette of 16.7 
million colours: that's the 
largest number that will fit into 
32-bits. 

Usually only a fraction of 
the total number of colours 
offered by the palette can be 
displayed on screen. Memory 
and resolution are the govern- 
ing factors. The total number 
of colours that can be repre- 
sented on screen depends on 
the number of bit planes (just a 
fancy way of saying bits devot- 
ed to a particular pixel). For 
instance, if a computer has 
four bit planes, it can display 
16 colours on screen at once. 
If, for instance, you have a 640 
by 400 screen with 32 bit 
planes then you would need 
1000K of video memory to 
support it (640' 400 "4- 
remember there are four bytes 
in 32 bits). 




AMIGA ENHANCED CHIP SET 

Commodore are in the throes of producing an Enhanced Chip Set 
(ECS) for existing A500 and A2000 Amigas. The new chips will 
replace old faithfuls like Agnes (no relation) and Denise. All current 
video modes will he supported - meaning the resolutions and 
colours offered by existing Amigas will still be available. The new 
version of Denise will offer a high resolution 640 by 512 non-inter- 
laced mode capable of four or 
eight colours. The exact num- 
ber of colours isn't known yet, 
but will probably be four. The 
new Agnes, meanwhile, will be 
able to access one megabyte 
of chip memory rather than 
512k. 

Agnes takes care of anima- 
tion and memory while Denise 
looks after resolution modes. 
AlOOO owners are going to be 
left in the lurch, though, as the 
first Agnes chip was long and 
thin, while the tarted up Agnes 
(and the Agnes found in A500 
and A2000 models} is square in 
shape. It's a fair bet that some 
third party manufacturer will produce a converter, though, which 
will allows the AlOOO to enjoy the new chips. 

A multi-sync monitor, which Commodore are also developing, 
will be needed to display the new mode. Although nothing firm has 
been confirmed by Commodore, it is likely that the ECS and multi- 
sync monitor will become part of their planned DTP push. 
Commodore are keen to keep the price of the ECS upgrade as low 
as possible. While no price has officially been set, industry com- 
mentators expect it to be well under £100. 




FORMAT M 15 



^^^^H 




• Offers full compatibility with all 
models, Amiga 500 and Amiga 1000 

• Top quality Citizen drive mechanism 

• One megabyte unformatted capacity 

• External plug in PSU (Atari ST) 

• Throughport (Amiga) 

• Very quiet 

• Slimline design 

• Colour matched to computer 

• Long cable for location 
either side of computer 

• Full 12 months guarantee 



Don Y forge/ - all prices shown 

include VAT and delivery 



£89.95 

including VAT and delivery 



Aims 



520STFM SUMMER PACK! 

Includes STFM with 1MEG drive, 22 
games (retail value £413.94) & Joystick. 

Only £349.00 

520 STFM 1MEG memory upgrade kit £99.00 

520 STFM with 1MEG drive internally fitted J £279.00 

1040 STF special clearance offer - snap up a real bargain! £349.00 

1040 STF offer as above, includes mono monitor £449.00 

1040 STFM latest model, includes TV modulator £419.00 

1040 STFM as above, with mono monitor £529.00 

Mega ST2 with mono monitor £849.00 

Mega ST4 with mono monitor £1099.00 

SLM804 laser printer, great value at £1099.00 

SM124/5 mono monitor £1 19.00 

SH205 20Mb hard disk £449.00 

Mega ST2 Special Offer; includes Mega ST2, mono monitor 

SLM804 laser, 'Microsoft Write*, 'VIP Professional' & Tlmeworks DTP ... £1795.00 
DTP system - includes Mega ST4, Mono Monitor, SLM804 laser, 

'Fleet Street Publisher', 20Mb hard disk & 90 day on site maintenance ... £2999.00 

Philips CM8833 colour monitor c/w ST lead £259.00 

Philips CM8852 as above, higher resolution £299.00 

(Extra £10.00 discount on Philips monitors if bought with an ST) 



All ST prices include: mouse etc. PLUS 5 disks of s ware including 

wordpro. utilities, graphics, game and demos. 

We can quote you for any combination of hardware. 



PRINTERS 

All prices include VAT, delivery and cable 



Star LC10 replaces the NL-10, features 4 NLQ fonts, paper parking, 

front panel operation, PLUS 2 extra ribbons free of chargel £219.00 

Star LC10 7-colour version of above printer, inc.2 extra black ribbons £269.00 

Star LC24-10 New feature-packed budget 24 pin multifont printer £339.00 

Star NB24-10 high 24pin quality, inc.free sheet feeder + 2 extra ribbons... £499.00 

Star ND-10 180/45cps high quality 10" carriage printer £349.00 

Star NX-15 budget wide carriage printer £329.00 

Star NB24-15 wide carr. version of NB24-10, inc. cut sheet feeder £649.00 

Star Laserprinter 8 high specification laser, price includes 

one year on-site maintenance (send for print samples.demos) £1795.00 

NEC P2200 budget 24pin, great value 168/56cps £319.00 

Panasonic KXP1081 reliabfe budget 10" printer 120724 cps £169.00 

Citizen 120D budget 10" dot-matrix, 120cps £139.00 

Citizen LSP-100 budget 10", 150/30cps.... £169.00 



DOUBLE TAKE! 



TV/MONITOR 

(MODEL 1022) 



High quality medium resolution 
colour TV/monitor now avail- 
able to suit the ST or Amiga. 
Features full infra-red remote 
control, Euroconnector, Video/ 
Audio input and headphone 
output connectors, 39 tuner 
presets, external aerial con- 
nector and a loop aerial. Sup- 
plied with cable (please state 
| computer type when ordering). 



SPECIAL 
OFFER ! 

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3.5" Disks 



10 Bulk packed DS/DD 3.5" disks 

with labels, fully guaranteed £11.95 

25 bulk disks as above £27.95 

10 disks as above with plastic case £13.95 

25 disks as above, with 40 capacity 

lockable storage unit £34.95 

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SKC MF2DD DS/DD 3.5" disks. Box of 10 .... £17.95 



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Also at: 1762 Pershore RfL, Cotteridge, Birmingham B30 3BH Tel: 021 458 4564 




SPRITE 
FACTORY 



Creating convincing animated graphics is one of the 
hardest tasks games programmers face. Richard 
Monteiro looks at a package designed to take the 
drudgery out of sprite creation, animation and 
implementation. 



£49.95 ■ Colour STs only ■ Future Software Systems/CRL, 7 Kings 
Yard, Carpenters Road, London, E15 2HD (01-985 2391} 



Joining the ranks of Pro Sprite 
Designer and the sprite creator 
bundled with STOS, Sprite 
Factory comes in a ring folder; the 
manual is staple-bound. Somebody 
somewhere screwed up. The package 
also includes two disks, containing 
the sprite generator, Chameleon (file 
conversion utility), demo programs 
and a folder full of compressed files. 
These expand to fill three, single- 
sided disks. 

The minimum configuration nec- 
essary to run Sprite Factory is a 520 
with colour monitor (or television). 





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■ Rotating, shrinking, flipping, 
shifting and other image-distorting 
features are readily performed on 
the large grid area. 



Only the 16-colour low resolution 
mode is supported. 

There are plenty of design 
options, which are all accessible from 
a menu box on the main design 
screen. FILE lets you load or save 
sprite data, palette information and 
animation sequences. Opting to load 
a file produces a prompt asking you 
to place the data in the data buffers 
FILE1 or FILE2. FILE1 is the active 
buffer in which all operations are car- 
ried out. FILE2 is used for copying or 
inserting frames into the active buffer. 

CLEAR does the obvious. FILL 
produces another menu: 4-Way fills an 
area until it hits another colour without 
crossing a diagonal boundary, 8-Way 
fills in all directions, Fill All changes 
every pixel of a specific colour. 
Several options exist for drawing 
lines, boxes and circles. There are 
MIRROR, ROTATE and SHRINK func- 
tions, but oddly no expand feature 
exists. 

Single sprites are stored in 
frames. The maximum size of a frame 
is 32 by 32 pixels - a limitation con- 
sidering that the trend in games is to 
have huge, detailed sprites. Having a 
constant frame size means that ani- 



OTHER GOODIES 



A picture file conversion utility called Chameleon comes bundled with Sprite 
factory, which lets you cut graphics from Degas, NeoChrome, IFF or Sprite 
Factory pictures and incorporate them into your own programs. 

Four archived files also come with the system. These must be un- 
archived with a program supplied before they can be used. You'll need a cou- 
ple of extra disks to store all the uncompacted files. The extra files are MAP- 
MAKER, JOYSTICK, SCROLL and GFADEMO. 

Mapmaker can be used for creating large screens and maps using 
sprites as primitives. With MAPMAKER you can create a map consisting of 
100 screens per level. Five levels are permissible - that's 500 screens of 
custom play-area packed into 60k! 

The Joystick program allows you to check your sprites under joystick 
control. You can define the sequence for eight directions. When using this 
program look for smoothness of motion, speed of movement in all directions, 
realism and clarity. 

Scroll simply demonstrates smooth scrolling under joystick control, big 
deal, and GFAdemo is a demo that runs under GFA BASIC (V2). 



■ The largest sprite 
you can create is 
32 pixels by 32. 
Creating sprites is 
simply a matter of 
selecting a colour 
from the multi- 
coloured bar just 
above the large 
grid, and clicking 
the mouse pointer 
somewhere in the 
grid. A small grid 
displays the sprite 
at actual size. 




mation is very easy. The animation 
section allows you to select up to 
1000 frames in any sequence and 
then replay them. The software per- 
mits jostling of frames and altering of 
replay rate. 

Sprite factory contains everything 
necessary for putting working sprites 
into your programs. Animation and 
collision detection are well provided 
for with tutorials and example pro- 
grams on the disks. Sprite factory 
scores highly in most departments, 
but only works in low resolution, only 
allows sprites sizes up to 32 by 32 
pixels and isn't cheap. 



COLLISION 
DETECTION 

The simplest way to detect 
the collision of two objects is 
to define a rectangle 
surrounding each object. 
Although this method is fast, it 
ignores the detail or curves in 
an object. An extension tothe 
boundary-detection method is 
to use a polygon with an 
increasing number of sides. 
Ultimately this technique 
allows a pixel-thin outline of an 
object. 



for 



Tutorials on animation and 
collision detection 
Good sprite editing fea- 
tures 

I Game map generator 
included 

l Animations can have lOOO 
frames 

against 

I Limited sprite size 
I Low resolution only 
I Binder and manual don't 
fit together 




FORMAT M 17 




8^ 



ANIMATION 
SPEEDS 

Some Flipper animations play 
back faster than others. This 
depends on the number of 
changes between each frame: 
the compression routine only 
saves the differences between 
pictures. Consequently 
pictures that differ greatly 
from frame to frame take up 
more memory and require a 
greater time to decompress. 
Completely dissimilar pictures 
will increase in size when 
packed, so you can't use 
Flipper as a slide-show pro- 
gram. (If that's all you want, try 
Vilbm given away on issue 2.) 





£ 

GRAPHICS 





FLIPPER 



You've got plenty of time to create award-winning 
animations for next year's Amiga Animation Competition, 
but Hash Enterprises would still like to speed up the 
process for you. Richard Monteiro looks at their budget 
animation utility. 



£42 ■ Amiga only, 1MB, two drives recommended ■ Hash Enterprises/Amiga Centre Scotland, 
4 Hart Street Lane, Edinburgh, Scotland, EH1 3RN (031 5574242) 




The Amiga Animation 
Competition sponsored by 
the Amiga Centre Scotland 
has been and gone. The event 
sparked off great interest in moving 
graphics and a repeat event is 
promised for next year. Commodore 
might be involved next time round 
and have been heard to mumble "TV 
coverage". Whatever happens, 
there's still the attraction of an A2000 
first prize. 

So what do you need to create 
animations good enough to win big 
prizes? If you're not into sleepless 
nights and intravenous coffee, 
Ripper could be a good bet. Flipper 
is another in Hash Enterprise's 
Animation: series, and follows on 
from Stand, Multiplane, Effects and 
Apprentice. Essentially, Flipper lets 
you create vignettes (short animation 
sequences). All you need is a selec- 
tion of pictures created by an art 
package or grabbed by a digitiser; 
F//pper does the rest. All pictures in a 
sequence must be of the same reso- 
lution - You can't mix high with low 
resolution, four-colour with 32-colour 



for 

Reasonably cheap for an 
animation package 
Intuitive to use 

against 

I Errors in compacting not 
always displayed 

I Can't create stand-alone 
animations 

I Few features when 
compared with similarly- 
priced competition 



images, or overscanned with non- 
overscanned. 

Starting a script 

The first stage in creating an anima- 
tion - assuming you have a diskfull of 
pictures - is to create a script by 
selecting image files in the order you 
wish them to appear in the animation. 
The same picture can appear several 
times. 

Once you've decided which pic- 
tures are to appear in the animation, 
you can determine how many times a 
frame is to repeat. Frames are dis- 
played on screen for a 12th of a sec- 
ond and, not surprisingly, can be 
forced to repeat in 12th of a second 
increments. 

The next operation involves pack- 
ing the files detailed in the script. Two 
packing options exist: ANIM and 
HASH. ANIM is the standard used by 
other packages; it squashes frames 
more tightly and plays them back 
faster than the HASH technique. The 



only reason you might want to use 
HASH packing is to maintain com- 
patability with other Hash products. 
Make sure you have a blank disk with 
plenty of free space for the compact- 
ed animation. Errors occasionally 
occur during packing, but no mes- 
sage appears informing you of the 
problem. This can be extremely frus- 
trating as it can be a good few min- 
utes before you realise something is 
wrong. 

Animated action 

A separate program on the disk plays 
back the compacted screens. And 
that's all it does, although certain key 
presses allow you to increase or 
decrease the playback rate. 

If s a shame there isn't an option 
for creating stand-alone animations. 
Having an extra program to load and 
display the packed pictures is a bind. 
Admitted Hipper is half the price of 
most animation software, but even so 
it has few features. 




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SOFTWARE Phone 24 hrs 

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(Send for full list of our software) 



ATARI 520STFM 
COMPUTACENTA CHRISTMAS PACKS 



PACK A 

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with built in 1 mb disc drive. 

mouse, 

owners handbook. 

business organiser. 

21 game software pack. 

joystick 

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with built in 1 mb disc drive, mouse. 

owners handbook, business 
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joystick, mouse mat. Iwin joystick 
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PACKC 

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mouse, owners handbook. 

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joystick. PLUS!! 

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Mouse controller, Deluxe 
Paint, Workbench 1 .2, 
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£199.95 



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Euromax Professional £13.95 

Euromax Elite £10.45 

Euromax Micro Ace £11.95 



JOYSTICKS 



Competition Pro 5000 clear . £13.45 

Competition Pro 5000 £12.95 

Competition Pro Extra £13.95 

Euromax Arcade £15.95 



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Cheetah 125+ £6.95 

Kraft Maze Master £8.95 

Atari Standard £6.95 



17, CAMPBELL STREET, BELPER, DERBY. DE5 1AP 
TELEPHONE 0773 826830 




BYTEWARE LTD. 

9 MARITIME TERRACE 
SUNDERLAND 

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NEW!! GIFT WRAPPING SERVICE -PLEASE PHONE FOR DETAILS 



LARGE RANGE OF TITLES AVAILABLE WITH UP TO 40% OFF RRP 

ORDERS DESPATCHED IN 24 HOURS 

ADVANCE ORDERS TAKEN FOR FORTHCOMING RELEASES - 

DESPATCHED ON DAY OF RELEASE 

24 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE 



TITLE 



ST AMIGA TITLE 



ST 



Battle Chess * 

Defender of the Crown 17 

Dungeon Master 14. 

Oids 11. 

Romantic Encounter — 

5 Star Compilation 16 

Ferrari Formula 1 — 

Outrun 13 

Winter Olympiad '88 1 1 

Instant Music — 

Iron Lord * 

Xenon 11 

Obliterator 14 

Flintstones 1 1 

Captain Blood 14 

Gunship 14 

Bards Tale 1 17 

Grid Iron — 

Sinbad — 

Degas Elite 17 

sja Vu 14 

auntJet II ". 13. 

Her Beardsley 1 1 

jgend of the Sword 14 

lent Service 14 

ittleships 8 

jsic Construction Set 1 7 

>mputer Hits 17 

iri Warriors 8 

icklash 11 

y Fox 13. 

'ike Force Harrier 14 

ernational Soccer 1 1 , 

syond the Ice Palace 1 1 . 

ixter 14. 

irk Castle 14, 

iwn 11. 

dCats 11. 

ndora 11 

perbowl 6. 

"AC 26. 

lice Quest 11 

rdsTale2 * 

Question of Sport 1 1 



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Football Manager II 11.95 

Fast ST Basic (Disc) 31 .50 

Fast ST Basic (Rom) 59.50 

Ghost 'n Goblins 1 1.95 

Publisher 1000 — 

Kings Quest Triple Pack 1 4.95 

Interceptor — 

Flight Simulator 2 29.50 

Jet * 

Three Stooges — 

Time & Magik 1 1.95 

Heroes of the Lance 16.50 

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Sherlock * 

Adventure Con. Set — 

Stir Crazy 11.95 

Guild of Thieves 14.95 

Strike Force Harrier 14.95 

Carrier Command 14.95 

Buggy Boy 14.95 

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Arcade Force Four 16.50 

Black Jack Academy — 

Faerytale Adventure — 

Port of Call — 

Sidewinder 6.50 

ST Wars * 

Mindfighter 14.95 

Tempus 22.95 

Bombjack 11.95 

Worlds Greatest Epyx 16.50 

Game Over II 17.75 

Leaderboard Birdie 13.50 

Tracers — 

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Mickey Mouse 13.50 

Empire Strikes Back 1 1 .95 

Space Harrier 11.95 

Overlander 11.95 

Corruption 14.95 

Street Fighter 13.50 



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CHEQUES/P.O'S PAYABLE TO BYTEWARE LTD 






CAUTION! 

if you manage to get hold of a 
blitter chip, you fit it at your 
own risk. As soon as you open 
up your ST your guarantee is 
invalidated. We've successfully 
blitterised our office Mega ST, 
but we won't *be responsible 
for your mistakes! 

Be wary of static electrici- 
ty-it can cause many of your 
ST's chips to blow, conse- 
quently costing you hundreds. 
Carry out the work near water 
pipes or some other object 
that youVe sure is grounded. 
Before you start hacking away 
at your machine touch the 
pipes. This will remove any 
static electricity that happens 
to be attached to you. Take 
care when handling the blitter; 
try not to touch any of the 
pins. 




BOOST 
YOUR ST 



Two methods for speeding up your ST. One involves « 
solder sucker, blitter chip and chainsaw. The other boots 
from disk. Richard Monteiro, with stop watch in 
hand, puts both to the test. 



ST BLITTER CHIP 

Anybody who has bought a 
Mega ST knows that they are 
supposed to have a blitter 
chip inside to boost their graphics; 
however, because of initial shortages 
Atari did not install them. Now that 
supplies are (just about) flowing, you 
can fit your own blitter and tur- 
bocharge your ST. 

Your local dealer could probably 
fit the silicon slice... for a fee. If 
you've got a Mega ST2 or Mega ST4 
then it's probably worth doing the 
operation yourself. After all, it only 
involves placing the blitter in a socket 
and removing two dabs of solder. 



FITTING BUTTERS IN 520S AND 
1040S 

Early 520s and 1040s can't easily accept a blitter chip - there's no 
blitter socket and the firmware wouldn't recognise the chip anyway. 
The problem is less severe with later ST models. You can tell if your 
ST contains one of the newer versions as the years '1986/87' will 
appear in the Desktop Info box (accessible from the Desk menu). 

Unfortunately even new 520s and 1040s don't have a blitter 
socket - there's room on the motherboard for a socket though. The 
socket costs £4 and is available from most component suppliers. 
Don't, however, expect any information on fitting the socket: it's 
easy enough if you're experienced with a soldering iron and have 
nerves of steel; otherwise ifs definitely a job for your local comput- 
er repairman. 

■MKH 




■ Take this to your dealer. There are 68 holes to desolder before 
you can fit the blitter socket. And a further two (W3 and W4) after. 
But first you've got the protective shielding to contend wrth. 



20 ■ FORMAT 



Carefully follow the captions to 
pictures 1 to 4, which show you the 
installation process. You will nee a 
pair of pliers, a soldering iron, a 
screwdriver and a solder-sucker. If 
you haven't got one of these, try your 
local electrical repair shop - they 
may lend you one. Alternatively take 
your ST down to the repair shop with 
this article - it's a two minute affair 
so it won't cost much; if anything. 



Once everything's back together 
and working, a new item, 'Blitter', in 
the 'Options' menu tells you that the 
blitter is functioning correctly. You 
can click on this item to switch the 
blitter on or off; a tick to the side of 
the option tells you that the chip is 
operative. Some programs won't 
work with the blitter - that's why the 
on/off function is present. 

GEM automatically makes use of 




ml- Disconnect your Mega from the mains and unplug the keyboard and 
any other items attached. Remove all the screws securing the two halves of 
the case, and gently remove the top half. A wire between the motherboard- 
shielding and top half of the case will prevent you from separating the two 
pieces immediately. Towards the left at the back of the micro you will find 
the wire attachment Prise the connector apart. With a pair of pliers, 
straighten all the clips that hold the shielding to the motherboard. Remove 
the shielding to expose the circuit board - Bang goes your guarantee. 




m 2 - You'll find the empty blitter socket to the right of the cartridge port 
and above the 68000 processor. Look for two relatively large solder blobs. 
One can be found above a resistor pack (RP1) while the other is left of the 
internal hard disk socket. Hope you've brought a solder sucker with you. 



BUTTER VERSUS TURBO ST 

The blhter chip and the Turbo ST program do different jobs. The blitter is 
designed to move blocks of data, preferably large blocks, at high speed, ft 
does this very well. Turbo ST also moves blocks - but only character-sized 
blocks. The blitter is more versatile as it speeds up block-movement of any 
size, vertical and horizontal line drawing, and other GEM block-graphic func- 
tions. Turbo ST speeds up screen printing and rectangle fills. 

With a blitter installed you will notice that window -redrawing is faster 
(look closely). Turbo ST speeds up window updating (the speed at which text 
or icons fill the window). 

We carried out some simple timing tests with the standard system r blit- 
ter-boosted system and Turbo ST-enhanced system. The tests measure the 
system under the best possible conditions; hence these are the greatest 
speed increases you're likely to get In practice the gain will be less. 
Character printing to the screen with blitter installed results in a speed 
increase of 20% on the standard system. Turbo ST beefs up character print- 
ing by 31%. 

Line drawing is faster by 22% when the blitter is onboard. Turbo ST does 
nothing to improve performance. Box drawing is increased by 82% with the 
blitter (for very large boxes, that is). Again Turbo ST does nothing. 

Software performance is marginally improved by both blitter and Turbo 
ST. ST BASIC is perhaps most noticeably improved when Turbo ST is installed 
- it almost makes ST BASIC useable. Most packages that manipulate text 
benefit from Turbo ST: Word Writer, GFA BASIC, Final Word, Data Manager. 
While all software that uses GEM will benefit marginally from the blitter, there 
is next to nothing that really shows off the true power of this chip - Cyber 
Studio is one exception. 



the blitter, so window operations will 
be much faster. All software that uses 
GEM's block graphic calls will reap 



the blitter's benefits. Games software 
will not usually, unless the routines 
access the blitter directly. 




■ 3 - Remove the solder blobs with a solder socket. Try not to suck half the 
circuit board at the same time. Remove the metal bar lying across the blitter 
socket. Use a blunt instrument 




■ 4 - Now fit the chip. The blitter socket has a tiny hole bored into one of its 
edges; the blitter has a similar-sized indentation along one of its sides. This 
indicates which way the chip fits into the socket. Put the bar back when 
you've fitted the blitter. And now put the rest of the ST back together. Pray 
that the blitter functions correctly. 



TURBO ST 

£39.95 ST only ■ £39.95 
■ Softrek/HiSoft, The Old 
School, Greenfield, 
Bedford, MK45 5DE (0525 
718181) 

The blitter chip is very good at mov- 
ing large amounts of data around the 
screen quickly; but when it comes to 
shifting character-size blocks, it's 
hopeless. The reason is that the blit- 
ter takes a long time to set up: 
numerous parameters must be sent 
to the chip telling it what it has to 
move and what operation it must per- 
form on the data it moves. This pro- 
cedure is slow and must be carried 
out for every single operation. 

As the ST has no text mode 
(characters are displayed on screen 
in graphics mode), any operation that 
involves placing characters on screen 
will use the blitter if ifs there. Usually 
characters are held in an 8x8 matrix - 
not very large which means the blit- 
ter's powers are poorly used. 

Turbo ST has been designed to 
speed up most ST programs that 
write text to your screen - word pro- 
cessors, spreadsheets, DTP pack- 
ages, certain features of the Desktop 
and so on. 

The software that does the 
speeding up is an Accessory, so all 
you need do is place the program in 
the root directory of your boot disk. 
Resetting the computer causes the 
accessory to load automatically. From 
the Desk menu you can click on the 
Turbo ST option which causes a dia- 
log box to appear. Options let you 
install or remove Turbo ST. That's all 
there is to it. 

Does it work? Yes. But it's unlikely 
you'll notice the difference - not 
unless you switch Turbo on and off 
regularly and watch closely, that is. 
Most programs that manipulate text 
will benefit from being turbocharged 
(see the box for more details). 
Commercial games won't; neither will 
graphic-intensive packages. 



SI 



for 

Very simple set up proce- 
dure 

Faster than the blitter for 
certain operations 
Works with the majority of 
GEM-based programs 

against 

I Won't increase printing of 

GDOS fonts 
I Only speeds up text and 

rectangle fill routines 



BUYING 
THE BLITTER 

Not an easy one this as there's 
a serious shortage of the 
chips. Atari have a stock, but 
these are being sent to dealers 
and customers who have 
requested the superslice of sili- 
con months ago. It's unlikely 
that the situation wilt improve 
until early next year. Your local 
dealer might be able to supply 
you with a chip under the 
counter... but at what cost? 
Around £22. 

With Megas, Blitters are 
usually included in the price 
and your dealer should be able 
to get and fit one for you. 
Certainly Silica Shop, the main 
Atari dealer, offer a free 
upgrade service for all Megas 
bought from them. 







SUPPLIERS 

For the latest ST PD try any of 
the following: Softville (0742 
588429), Fioppyshop ST 
{0224 691824), Page 6 (0785 
213928), Star UK (0224 
593024). All the PD mentioned 
this month was supplied by 
Fioppyshop ST - thanks 
chaps. The disks in their cata- 
logue system to look out for, 
in case you are interested in 
ordering, are UTL09 and 
UTL36. 

If you run a Software 
library and would like to be 
mentioned on this list, or if you 
have discovered titles worthy 
of a mention on these pages, 
please let us know. Write to 
PD Update, ST/Amiga 
Format, 4 Queen Street, 
Bath, BA1 IE! 





] 


TdT| 




PD 



STPD 



Public domain libraries just grow and grow. And the 
quality gets better and better — Richard Monteiro peruses 
the best of the latest ST PD utilities. 



There's more to PD software 
than games, demos and digi- 
tised nudes. Forget them ail 
and take a look at some of the excit- 
ing quality software that is beginning 
to emerge. 

Lots of good software exists; 
really outstanding programs are hard- 
er to come by. Quality, originality and 
competence usually merits a PD 
Platinum accolade - titles given these 
awards really shouldn't be missing 
from your collection. 



PD 



3ESE3SE 



FSEL 

When you load or save a file from 
within a commercial program, it is 
likely you will be presented with a file 
selector box. This allows you to type 
in a file name, log in another disk or 
open a folder. The imaginatively 
named FSEL customises the standard 
GEM selector making it much friendli- 
er and more powerful. 

FSEL sits in an auto folder and 
automatically loads at start up. It 
uses up around 20K of memory 
which is negligible when used with the 
majority of software. You won't be 
aware of the patch until you load or 
save a file from within a commercial 
package: ST BASIC, TIMEWORKS, 
DEVPAC ST r DEGAS ELITE, and so 
on. 

Unfortunately no documentation 
comes with FSEL r but it doesn't take 



OTHER 
NOTE WORTHY TITLES 

Look out for these items of PD software also worth a place in your 

collection: 

PC COMMAND - a command-line interpreter with batch file support. 

It provides an interactive interface to TOS. Commands are similar 

to PC-DOS. Provides faster access to TOS facilities than the GEM 

desktop. Multiple commands can be entered on a single line for 

better efficiency. 

TURBO DOS - speeds up FAT searching (by at least two times), 

caches all directories ever read and fixes the 40-folder bug. 

PRIVATE EYE - an accessory that displays everything there is to 

know about your ST: drives attached, memory, Caps Lock status, 

etc. 



22 ■ FORMAT 



long to work out what it does. 

Along with the standard file selec- 
tor options, FSEL displays extra file 
information, like the creation date and 
size. Files may also be sorted alpha- 
betically, by extension, by date or by 
size. The directory can also be print- 
ed at any time and any drive can be 
selected as long as it is present. 

An icon with a question mark also 
sits in the customised file selector; 
clicking on it appears to have no 
effect. Can anyone help? 

FORMAT 11 

Available in accessory form, this disk 
formatting program will stretch your 
ST's drive capabilities to the limit. 
Doubtless you're sick of formatting 
utilities, but this one beats the lot! 
Even Amiga owners will cringe when 
they know how much data can be 
saved on a double-sided disk - 925K 



lets you create any type of sector lay- 
out with custom ID fields, any gap 
lengths, control CRCs, and many 
other oddities; the analyzer copes 
with abnormal formats and displays 
track information, data between sec- 
tors and ID fields. 

The copier is pretty hot too; suf- 
fice to say that it comes with a full 
range of backup utilities that extends 
to cover copy-protected disks. 



PD 



usMm 

SUPER BOOT 2.0 

An all-in-one boot program that does 
just about everything you could ever 
want. It allows you to display any pic- 
ture in TNY format, choose which 
accessories to load, choose from any 
number of DESKTOP.INF files (thus 
allowing you to change resolution, 



Desk File Search Options Program 



B:\DEHDS\CflLC.BlflS 



Line: 1 Go): 

ren Soptlon o-n- 

1B PRIM "BYTE CM 

t=tiner 

2B »=5BBB 

3B fl=Z.718281B284S 

4B B=3. 1415326535! 

SB C=l 

68 FOR 1=1 TO MR 

7B C=C*ft 

8B C=C»B 

SB C=C/R 

IBB C=C/B 

US NEXT I 

t=tlner-t 

12B PRUT "ERR0R= 

print "Took" t "s 



ITEM 
Directors*: 

fi:\DEMOS\«.BflS 

Selection: CflLC 



hue 



RESDEHO ,BRS 
CRLC .BBS 
DEMO .BBS 
DIR25TR .BRS 
DISKCOPY.BRS 
DUHP .BRS 
FRSTCQHU.BflS 
HANOI .BflS 
PCMflLL .BUS 



85SZ 

276 
1273 
1163 
280S 
1270 
1B783 
2316 
1263 



l mm 

m 



7-27-87 . 
11-B6-B7 P 

3-27-B7 

7-27-87 

3-15-87 

7-27-87 
11-28-85 

3-15-87 
11-06-87 



m 



2L 



Loan i tue 



■ The cus- 
tomised file 
selector 
offered by 
FSEL It offers 
immediate 
drive selec- 
tion, printout 
of directories, 
file sorting 
and extra 
drive informa- 
tion. But what 
does the 
question mark 
icon do? 



in total. Astounding. 

The formatter works by 
squeezing 11 sectors onto each 
track, and formatting 83 tracks. Yes, 
your drive needs to be in tip-top con- 
dition. That said, we found disks for- 
matted in this manner to be reliable. If 
next month's issue of Format is late, 
you'll know they didn't last! 

DISKMECH 

A superb disk analyser, archiver and 
editor. Just look what it can do: the 
sector editor can read and edit any 
sector regardless of size, track num- 
ber, or side number; the format editor 






window layout and so on), decide 
which programs in the AUTO folder to 
run, have Write Verify on or off, set 
the date and time, and a whole load 
more. 

Super Boot works on any Atari 
ST, from any boot drive, and in either 
colour or monochrome. 

A configuration program allows 
you to tailor Super Boot to your pref- 
erences. This alters the main pro- 
gram which resides in an AUTO fold- 
er. Options are turned on or off by 
pointing and clicking - very friendly 
for free software. Even the documen- 
tation is good - too god to be true! 



)ur superb drive can really help you make the 
most of your ST allowing complex software to 
be run without disc swapping etc. The drive 
comes complete with all cables to connect it to 
any ATARI 1040 STF or 520 STFM 

• Ultra quiet 

• Slim styling, colour matched to the ST 

• Top quality Citizen/NEC drive mechanism 

• 1 megabyte capacity (unformatted) 

• Full one year parts and labour guarantee. 

Available now only £84.99 inc. VAT & P&P 



NEW NEW 

*** AMIGA SOUNDBLASTER *** 

Everyone knows that the Amiga has the best sound facilities available on 
any popular computer today. Unfortunately until now, unless you could 
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The AMIGA SOUNDBLASTER is a small stereo amplifier that comes 
' complete with 2 high quality 20 WATT 3 way speakers. It is easily 
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games. 

• Comes complete with 2 high quality stereo speakers 

• Twin volume/balance controls 

• Headphone socket 

• Very easy to connect 

• Compatible with all software/hardware 

•* Free stereo headphones with all orders 
for a limited period •• 

Amiga Soundblaster is just £39.99 
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GAMES RRP OUR 

King 01 Chicago (AO) 29.99 19.99 

Defender of the Crown 29.99 19.99 

Smbad (AO) 29.99 19.99 

S.D.I 29.99 19.99 

Barbarian 24.95 15.95 

Terrorpods 24.95 15.95 

Obliterator 24.95 15.95 

F/A-18 Interceptor (AO) 24.95 19.95 

Jet (Sublogic) (AO) 45.95 29.95 

Balance of Power 24.95 16.95 

Barbarian (Palace) 19.99 13.95 

Three Stooges (AO) 29.99 18.95 

Sky Chase 24.95 16.95 

Grand Slam Tennis (AO) 24.95 16.95 

Platoon 24.95 16.95 

E.C.O 24.95 16.95 

Quadralien 24.95 15.95 

Leatherneck 19.95 13.95 

Rolling Thunder 24.99 16.99 

Federation of Freetraders 29.95 20.95 

Shadowgaie 24.95 16.95 

Empire Strikes Back 24.95 15.95 

Elite (Sept) 24.95 15.95 

Birdie 24.95 16.95 

Black Tiger 24.95 16.95 

Football Manager II 19.99 13.99 

Flight Simulator II 45.95 29.95 

Turbo 19.99 12.95 

Art of Chess 24.95 16.95 

Ebonstar(AO) 24.99 15.99 

Craps Academy (AO) 24.99 15.99 

Pandora 19.95 12.95 

Strip Poker II 14.95 10.95 

Tetris 19.95 13.95 

Daley Thompson (ST) 19.99 13.95 

Wizball 24.95 16.99 

Street Fighter 24.95 15.95 

Outrun (ST) 19.99 13.95 

Dungeon Master (ST) 24.95 15.95 

Stargliderll 24.95 16.95 

Never Weld 19.95 13.95 



GAMES RRP OUR 

Buggy Boy (ST) 19.95 12.95 

Buggy Boy (AO) 24.95 16.95 

Monville Manor 24.95 1 6.95 

Starray 24.95 15.95 

Time Stood Still 19.99 13.99 

Better Dead Than Alien 1 9.95 1 3.95 

Peter Beardsley Soccer 1 9.95 1 2.95 

Scrabble (ST) 1 9.95 1 3.95 

Whirligig 19.95 12.95 

Gee Bee Air Rally 24.95 1 6.95 

Virus 24.99 15.99 

Captain Blood (ST) 24.95 15.95 

Carrier Command (ST) 24.95 15.95 

Sky Blaster 19.95 13.95 

U.M Stimulator (ST) 24.95 16.95 

Star Trek (ST) 19.95 13.95 

Alien Syndrome (ST) 19.99 12.95 

Crystal Hammer 19.95 13.95 

Gunship(ST) 24.95 16.95 

! Hot Shot 19.95 13.95 

Hollywood Poker 19.95 13.95 

Vampires Empires 19.95 13.95 

Bad Cat 24.95 19.95 

Menace (AO) 19.95 13.95 

Silent Service 24.95 15.95 

Bubble Bobble 24.95 15.95 

I Mercenary 24.95 16.95 

Road War 2000 24.99 16.99 

Barbarian II (ST) 24.99 16.99 

Off Shore Warriors (AO) 24.99 1 6.99 

Phantasielll 24.99 16.99 

Thunder Boy 14.95 10.95 

Agrhhhh (AO) ,. 29.95 1 9.95 

BUSINESS PRODUCTS RRP OUR 

Superbase Personal 99.95 64.95 

Superbase Professional 249.95 169.95 

WordPerfect 288.85 149.95 

Logistixs 1 14.95 75.95 

VIP Professional 228.85 149.95 

Assembler 69.95 49.95 



BUSINESS PRODUCTS RRP OUR 

Amiga File 69.95 49.95 

Lattice C (AO) 189.95 139.95 

Pascal 89.95 59.95 

Lattice C (SP) 99.95 69.95 

Home Accounts (AO) 29.95 19.95 

Home Accounts (ST) 24.95 16.95 

Animator (AO) 57.50 39.95 

Animator 3D (AO) 129.95 99.95 

Protext (ST) 79.95 49.95 

Video Title 110.40 99.95 

Digicalc (ST) 39.95 29.95 

Sculpt 3D 89.00 79.00 

Draw Plus 198.95 149.95 

GFA Basic (ST) 65.95 45.95 

Audio Master 46.00 39.00 

K-Spread II 79.95 49.95 

K-Data 49.95 34.95 

K-Seka 49.95 34.95 

KDatat 49.95 34.95 

) K-Gadget 29.95 19.95 

K-Text 19.95 14.95 

! K-Comm II 49.95 34.95 

| The works ! 149.95 1 19.95 

! : GFA Draft Plus (ST) 139.95 99.95 

WriteS File 69.95 49.95 

STOS(ST) 29.95 19.95 

ADVENTURES RRP OUR 

I Jinxter 24.95 16.95 

Guild of Thieves 24.95 16.95 

| Mindfighter 24.99 15.99 

Stac ST Adventure Creator 39.95 24.95 

Corruption 24.95 15.99 

Uninvited 29.95 19.95 

ChronoQuest 29.99 19.95 

Hitch Hikers Guide 29.99 19.95 

Leather Goddess 29.99 19.99 

| Plundered Hearts 24.99 16.99 

Station Fall 29.99 19.99 

Phantasie III 24.99 16.99 

Time + Magik 19.95 16.95 



ADVENTURES RRP OUR 

Legend of the Sword 29.95 19.95 

HOW TO ORDER: 

All Prices Include VAT 

Game Products Postage Free. 

(U.K. Mainland Only) 

Overseas Orders Add £1.00 
Per Disk Airmail Add £2.00 

Per Disk Cheques / P. Order 
(Sterling Only Please) 



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17 STAPLE TYE, 

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*5 w o 




MIDI 
ON THE 
AMIGA 



Judging from the replies to issue l's questionnaire, a 
good number of you want to dabble in hardware 
projects. Never say we don't deliver. Robert Penfold 
explains how to build a price-busting MIDI interface for 
your Amiga and gives a few useful applications. 



The range of MIDI software for 
the Amiga is not yet what 
could really be called vast, but 
there is a steady flow of new MIDI 
titles, and the Amiga has good poten- 
tial in this area. Unlike the Atari ST, 



the Amiga has no built-in MIDI ports. 
The standard form of commercially 
available add-on MIDI interface for the 
Amiga is a simple adaptor for the seri- 
al port. 

A MIDI interface for the Amiga 



-0 




To pin 9 of the A500/A2000, or pin 23 of TQ pL ^ 
the A1000 serial interface W*—*—— —i—i 

i A 



H 



LINK I 
IC1 

3 

3 



0*3=* 




R13 R10 R9 R15 R18 R20 RV RG RB 



*ff°f ^2t>TR3t>™D 



R1 2 Rl l RIB R17 R19 R3 



R7 




■ Figure 1 - The com- 
ponent layout. In blue 
are the conductive 
copper tracks on the 
board. What you have 
to do is insert each 
component into its 
correct holes from the 
uncoppered side of 
the board, so that the 
wires stick out of the 
coppered side. Then 
solder the leads to the 
tracks. Refer to the 
parts list to make sure 
you put the right ones 
in the right places. 

This isn't printed 
at full size, so you 
can't etch your own 
board. A kit of parts is 
available - see later in 
the article. 



I 

24 ■ FORMAT 



does not need to be particularly com- 
plex, and it makes an ideal project for 
Amiga do-it-yourself addicts. The unit 
featured here plugs into the serial 
port of the A500, A1000, or A2000 
and provides MIDI 'IN', THRU', and 
three 'OUT ports. 

Serial crops 

Essentially, a MIDI interface is no 
more than a high-speed RS232 serial 
interface. However, there are differ- 
ences between MIDI and standard 
RS232C interfaces, and these must 
be taken care of by software and the 
computer's hardware. 

The standard MIDI word format is 
one start bit, eight data bits, one stop 
bit, and no parity. This is probably the 
most common RS232C word format, 
and it is one that any RS232C inter- 
face should be able to handle without 
any difficulty. The original MIDI specifi- 
cation had the baud rate at 19200 
baud, which is the highest standard 
rate for RS232C interfaces. This was 
deemed too slow, and was raised to 
31250 baud when MIDI was finally 
launched. This high and non-standard 
baud rate is the main obstacle when 
trying to use an ordinary serial port 
for MIDI purposes. 

Construction 
details 

Construction of the unit is made as 
easy as possible by having everything 
{including the five sockets) mounted 
on the printed circuit board. Details of 
the printed circuit and component 
positions are provided in Fig. L 

There are a few minor points to 
note when building the board, one of 
which is to make sure that IC1 is fit- 
ted round the right way. The U-shaped 
indentation on the body is not always 
present, but if not there should be a 
dot at the end of the component and 




I A top view of the completed board. 





^r 


4ut 

P.C.B 


Spacer 

Bottom 

of 

case 












\j~~Ly +• bo» 



LJ UJ 



ffi 



MUSIC 




PL I d 
RXD 



SK5 THRU 
O 2 



TR4 



jj 



R20 
22® 



I For the technically-minded, the circuit diagram of the Amiga MIDI interface. 



Amiga A1000 Connector (Plug) 




Amiga A500/2000 Connector (Socket) 



ooooooooooooo 

Vu -"// 

oooooooooooo 



■ How to mount the board in the box using spacers. 
Drill out the three mounting holes marked on the 
board if you need to - don't try a hammer and nail 
or you'll split it! 



■ Figure 2 - Connections to the serial interface 25-pin D connec- 
tors. These are viewed from the back, the side you see when sol- 
dering. The 12 volt power line is pin 9 on the A500/A2000, pin 23 
on the AlOOO. The other pins used - 2, 3, and 7 - don't change. 



offset to the left {it indicates which pin 
is pin 1 of the device). You should sol- 
der the IC socket onto the board first 
of all (it doesn't matter which way 
round that goes), then slot in the chip 
itself the right way round. 

You must also be careful to fit Dl 
and CI round the right way. A V 
(and/or a '-' sign) on the body of CI 
will show which lead is which, match it 
with the + on the board layout dia- 
gram. The four transistors have their 
leadout wires arranged so that they 
drop nicely into place on the board, 
but make sure there are no crossed- 
over wires. The resistors can be fitted 
either way round, but be careful not to 
get any of them swopped over. Two 
link-wires are needed, and these can 
be made from pieces of wire trimmed 
from resistor leadouts and bent to 
shape. 

If you are new to electronic pro- 
ject construction, ifs essential to 
practice soldering a few wires togeth- 
er before starting on the circuit board. 
Either that or buy two sets of compo- 
nents - one to practice with and one 
to build up properly! 

You will need a soldering iron with 



a rating of about 15 to 25 Watts fitted 
with a bit of around 2 millimetres in 
diameter. The best solder for this type 
of work is a '22 s.w.g. 60% tin/40% 
lead multi-cored flux' type. Use plenty 
of solder when mounting the DIN 
sockets on the circuit board as they 
need to be well and truly fixed to it. 
Make sure all the components are 
fully pushed down onto the board 
before soldering them. It helps to 
splay the leadout wires of resitors and 
transistors slightly. 

Good joints 

Excess length on the component lead- 
out wires should be trimmed about 3 
millimetres proud of the board before 
they are soldered in place. When mak- 
ing the soldered joints place the iron 
on each joint first and then feed in the 
solder. A good joint will have a sort of 
mountain shape. A globular appear- 
ance usually indicates a connection of 
dubious quality. Where the connec- 
tions are crowded together be careful 
to avoid bridging adjacent pads with 
too much solder. Carefully check the 
board for any accidental short circuits 
of this type and remove any that are 



found. 

The board is connected to the 
Amiga via a lead about 1 metre long 
terminated in a 25 way D connector. 
A plug is needed for the AlOOO, but 
the serial port on the A500 and 
A2000 was changed to give IBM com- 
patibility. A socket is therefore needed 
for these versions of the Amiga. The 
MIDI unit draws its power from the 12 
volt pin of the RS232 port - this is pin 
9 for the A500/A2000 but pin 23 for 
the AlOOO. Pins 2, 3 and 7 are the 
same for all Amigas, as shown in the 
wiring diagram for the different types 
of connector in Fig. 2. 

Any 4-way cable should be suit- 
able for the connecting lead. The 
multi-coloured "rainbow" type is best 
as this largely avoids the risk of 
misidentifying leads and getting 
crossed wires. Melt some solder onto 
the bared ends of the leads, and the 
appropriate four tags of the connec- 
tor, before soldering the lead to the 
plug. There should then be no difficul- 
ty in making reliable joints. Fit the con- 
nector with a cover assembly. At the 
board end the lead can be soldered 
direct to the board, but it is easier if 



DOESN'T 
WORK? 

it isn't entirely beyond the 
realms of possibility that your 
Amiga MIDI interface won't 
work first time, particularly if 
you aren't an experienced sol- 
dering iron wielder. 

Magenta Electronics, who 
are supplying the kit of parts, 
are also offering a GET YOU 
GOING SERVICE. If you really 
can't make your unit work, 
send it back with a £4 cheque 
to cover service and post to: 
MIDI Unit Repairs, Magenta 
Electronics, 1 35 Hunter 
Street, Burton-on-Trent, Staffs 
DE14 2ST. 

Make sure it is adequately 
padded from the post's infelici- 
ties, and please allow a couple 
of weeks for return. 



FORMAT ■ 25 



to 



MUSIC 



single-sided printed circuit pins are fit- 
ted to the board, and the cable is 
then connected to these. 

It is not essential to fit the unit in 
a case, but it is advisable to do so in 
order to keep the dust off and to pro- 
tect the components from knocks. 
The circuit board is fixed to the base 
panel of the case using three 6BA 
screws with 10 millimetre spacers 
and fixing nuts. The lead to the D con- 
nector passes through a hole drilled 
in the rear panel of the case. Fit this 
hole with a grommet to protect the 
cable and remember to thread the 
cable through the hole before con- 
necting it to the board and the con- 
nector. 

In use 

Give the wiring a thorough check for 
errors before trying out the interface. 
With the unit connected to the Amiga, 
the computer and Workbench soft- 
ware should boot-up and run normally. 
If not, switch off at once and recheck 
the MIDI interface unit. If all is well, 
the unit can be tried out with a suit- 
able program, such as Deluxe Music 
Construct/on Set, or any other pro- 



THE MIDI BAUD RATE 

The MIDI unit plugs into the Amiga's serial interface, so how does the system 
know to use the higher-than-normal Baud rate required? 

The Amiga controls its Baud rate by having a divide-by-'N' circuit 
between a clock generator and the device which provides the serial encod- 
ing/decoding (which is done by the the Amiga's 'Paula' custom chip). N is a 
number written to a hardware register, enabling any Baud rate within reason 
to be obtained with a fair degree of accuracy. 

The Amiga's divide-by-N register is called 'SERPER', and is at address 
SDFF032. Not all computer languages, including AmigaBASIC, will accept 
six-digit hexadecimal numbers, so you need to use the decimal equivalent, 
14676018. 

Bits to 14 of SERPER supply the number for the divide-by-N operation. 
To be precise, the divisor is one more than the number written to this regis- 
ter. Bit 15 of SERPER controls the byte length, which is either 8 or 9 bits. It 
would normally be 0, for eight bit operation. 

With the aid of a calculator it is not too difficult to work out the correct 
value to write to SERPER. Each clock cycle lasts 0.2794\is, and the duration 
of each MIDI bit is 32^s. Dividing 32 by 0.2794 and deducting one gives the 
correct divisor, which is 113.53. Values of 113 or 114 give a Baud rate 
accurate to 0.5%, which is perfectly acceptable. 

In the AmigaBASIC listings given elsewhere in the article, you will see the 
tine POKEW14676018&, 114. You should now be able to deduce why this sets 
the serial interface up for MIDI Baud rate. 



and individually addressable outputs. 
This may seem a bit pointless, but 
this idea is to enable the MIDI 'star' 
method of connection to be used 




To Footswitch 



■ Figure 3 - The pins you need to wire up if you are making a footswitch for 
the Pedal listing, This is shown from the back, the side you see when soldering. 



gram which uses the serial port 
method of MIDI interfacing. The inter- 
face connects to the other MIDI equip- 
ment via standard (5 way DIN) MIDI 
Leads. 

Although there are three outputs, 
they all transmit the same data. You 
do not have access to three separate 



LISTING 1 - PROGRAM CHANGE 

REM MIDI 'Program Change Pedal 1 Program 

INPUT "Enter channel number (1 to 16) ", channel 

change=channel+191 

x=0 

prog=0 

OPEN "coral : 300, n, St, 1" AS #1 

POKEW 14676018&,114 

WHILE x=0 

IF STRIG(2)=-1 THEN GOSUB midiout 

WEND 

midiout : 

prog=prog+l 

IF prog>63 THEN prog=0 

PRINT# 1,CHR$ (change); 

PRINT* 1 , CHR$ (prog) ; 

RETURN 



26 ■ FORMAT 



without having to buy a special THRU 
box (unless you want to drive more 
than three instruments from the unit 
that is). 

If you like to write your own soft- 
ware it is not too difficult to access 
the MIDI interface, although it does 
not seem to be entirely straightfor- 
ward from Amiga BASIC. Writing your 
own top flight sequencer or music 
notation programs is probably where 
do-it-yourself programmers can use 
their machine-code talents to the best 
effect. 

When writing programs in a lan- 
guage that provides support for the 
serial interface it is probably better to 
take this route rather than directly 
controlling the serial port hardware. 
One point that you must bear in mind 
is that MIDI does not use handshak- 
ing, and so data may well be lost if 
the computer tries to halt the flow of 
input data by setting a handshake line 
to the hold-off state. Any processing 
of MID! data must be done at high 
speed anyway, since the timing of 



data is normally important, and letting 
large amounts of data build up in a 
buffer will not give acceptable results. 
Although the MIDI baud rate of 31250 
can be set using Workbench's prefer- 
ences, note that this does not neces- 
sarily set the required baud rate when 
running a programming language. 

Here follow three simple exam- 
ples using AmigaBASIC for controlling 
MIDI instruments. 

Program change 
pedal 

Listing 1 is for a program that 
enables the Amiga to function as a 
program change pedal. The word 
'program' is being used here in its 
MIDI sense of a set of sound data for 
a synthesiser, or a set of parameters 
for any MIDI controllable device. A 
program change pedal permits the 
sounds of the instruments in a system 
to be altered using the 'look no hands' 
approach. Although this is an invalu- 
able feature for live performances, 
surprisingly few instruments incorpo- 
rate it. 

In the first part of the program 
the user enters the MIDI channel num- 
ber (1 to 16) on which the program 
change messages must be transmit- 
ted. (Remember you must click the 
mouse on the input window before 
you can enter anything into an INPUT 
instruction.) Each program change 
message consists of two bytes, and 
the first of these is the one which car- 
ries the program change code (most 
significant nybble) and the channel 
number (least significant nybble). The 
program change code is 1100 binary, 
which is 192 in decimal. The channel 
number must be added to this to give 
the total value of the first byte. MIDI 
channels are conventionally numbered 
from 1 to 16, but the values used in 
MIDI messages are actually from to 
15. Adding 191 to the channel nun> 
ber entered by the user therefore 



LISTING 2 - MIDI CONTROLLER EDITOR 

REM MIDI Controller Program 

OPEN ,, coml:300 / n,8,l" AS #1 

POKEW 14676018&,113 

INPUT "Enter channel number ",chan 

INPUT "Enter controller number ",conumb 

header=chan+175 

x=0 

WHILE x=0 

q=MOUSE(0) 

z r: ; =MOUSE{6)/1.92 

PRINT PTAB<100);z% 

print# 1, CHR? (header); 

PRINT# 1,CHR$ (conumb) ; 
PRINT # l,CHR$(z%); 

a$=INKEY$ 

IF a$=" " THEN GOSUB contnumber 

WEND 

contnumber : 

PRINT " " 

INPUT "Enter controller number ", conumb 

RETURN 



gives the correct value for the first 
byte in each message. The second 
byte in the message is simply the new 
program number, which is from to 
127, This is assumed to start at a 
value of 0, and the program incre- 
ments it by one each time the pedal is 
operated. 

The OPEN statement opens a 
channel to the serial port and sets it 
up with the right parameter, At least, 
it sets it up correctly apart from the 
baud rate, which is set to the right fig- 
ure by the POKEW at the next line. 
The main body of the program is a 
three line WHILE., .WEND loop. This 
checks the fire-button of joystick port 
2, and branches the program MIDI- 
OUT subroutine when this button is 
operated. A joystick connected to 



port 2 is fine for testing purposes, but 
to use the system in earnest a foot 
pedal must be connected to port 2 via 
a 9 pin D socket. Connection details 
for the socket are shown in Fig. 3. 

Some instruments do not use the 
MIDI program change numbers when 
selecting programs by way of the 
front panel controls. On a Casio CZ1 
for example, programs are selected 
by two rows of push-buttons labelled 
A to H and 1 to 8. The instrument's 
manual should make it clear how 
these program identifiers relate to the 
true MIDI program number. If the maxi- 
mum acceptable program number is 
reached, the program cycles back to 
zero again, and continues in this man- 
ner indefinitely. 

The program could easily be 




extended and customised to meet 
individual requirements. Extra pairs of 
PRINT# instructions plus an extended 
INPUT instruction could be used to 
permit the program change mes- 
sages to be sent on more than one 
channel. Rather than having to adjust 
the instruments to set programs 0, 1, 
2, 3, etc. to the required sounds, it 
should not be too difficult to produce 
a version of the program that enables 
the user to specify a sequence of pro- 
gram numbers. 

In control 

Most MIDI instruments permit at least 
some of their sound generator param- 
eters to be controlled via MIDI con- 
troller messages. The program in the 
second listing enables a controller to 
be selected from the keyboard and 
then adjusted by moving the mouse 
backwards and forwards. The screen 
displays the current controller value. 
This is generally faster and easier 
than controlling instruments via their 
rows of push button switches. 

In the initial part of the program 
the MIDI port is set up and the output 
channel to it is opened. Then the MIDI 
channel number and initial controller 
number are entered by the user. The 
MIDI control change message has 
1011 in binary as the most significant 
four bits of the header byte (176 in 
decimal). Adding 175 to the channel 
number therefore gives the value of 
the entire header byte, which is stored 
in the variable HEADER. The main 
body of the program repeatedly out- 
puts three byte MIDI controller mes- 
sages. These consist of the header 
byte followed by the controller num- 
ber, and then the value to be assigned 
to the controller. This value is 
obtained by reading the mouse using 
the MOUSE{6) function (which must be 
preceded by a dummy MOUSE(O) 
instruction). The value returned from 
the mouse is in the range to 244, 
but it is converted to an integer in the 
desired ranger of 0-127 by some sim- 
ple division, and rounded by assigning 
it to the integer variable Z%. 

The final part of loop is used to 




m 

MUSIC 



l-\ r-\ 



MIDI 

PROGRAMS 
ON DISK 

To get you going with MIDI 
we've included.all the listings 
from-tb$$e pages and two 
other superb utilities on this 
month's cover disk: 
DX VOICE FILER - allows you to 
store sound voice data from 
any of the popular Yamaha DX 
series synthesizers. 
MIDI UTILITY -allows you to 
record a MIDI sequence onto 
disk and play it back, and also 
acts as a voice filer for the 
Cagp CZ101 synthesizer. 
LISTINGS -the listings are in a 
drawer called MIDI LISTINGS on 
the disk. You need to load 
AmigaBASIC to be able. to run 
them. - -. 

*See the Disk Extra section 
on page 73 for more details. 



■ Thanks to the Bath 
Computer Shack for the loan, 
of the Casio CZ101 keyboard 
used in the photographs. 

If you are looking for a 
entry-level MIDI synth, the 
Casio'CZlOl or the Casio 
CZ230S are both recommend- 
ed buys. They will cost around 
£250. 



BAUD AND SIGNAL LEVELS 

From the hardware point of view the main difference between MIDI 
and an ordinary RS232C interface is that MIDI uses a current loop 
system, whereas RS232C interfaces use different voltages to repre- 
sent the two logic levels. The RS232C voltages are not normal 
and 5 volt logic levels, but nominal potentials of plus and minus 12 
volts. MIDI has a nominal output current of 5 milliamps which is 
switched on or off to represent the two logic levels. This is rather 
like switching a light bulb on and off, but it is actually a light emit- 
ting diode that is being controlled. This forms part of a device 
called an optoisolator which is standard issue at every MIDI output. 
The light output of the l.e.d is directed at a photo-cell, and this sim- 
ple arrangement couples the signal through to the controlled equip- 
ment without having any direct electrical connection to it. This 
reduces the risk of problems with the "hum" loops that tend to 
plague electronic music systems, as well as eliminating the risk of 
electrical noise from the Amiga (or other micro-controller) being 
coupled into the audio circuits of the controlled instruments. 

These differences in the input and output signals are all han- 
dled by the add-on interface. 



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monitor the keyboard, and it branches 
the program to the CONTNUMBER 
subroutine if the spacebar is pressed. 
This enables the controller number to 
be changed as and when desired. 

It is perhaps worth pointing out 
that the MIDI continuous controllers 
have numbers from to 63, but that 
these are used in pairs. For instance, 
controller and controller 32 are 
paired, as are controllers 1 and 33, 2 
and 34, etc. The lower numbered 
controller provides the seven most 
significant bits of the fourteen bit 
value, with the higher numbered one 
contributing the least significant bits. 
It is quite possible to roughly adjust a 
controller and then switch to its better 
half so that it can be fine tuned. In 
practice this is not usually necessary 
as few instruments use the full resolu- 
tion, and the controllers from 32 to 
63 are usually left unused. 

Control numbers from 64 to 95 
are switch types, and are either on 
(127) or off (0). For these controllers 
no other values are recognised by 
MIDI devices, but invalid numbers will 
not cause a malfunction, it is there- 
fore quite in order to operate them by 
manipulating the mouse for a value of 
or 127. Controller numbers above 
95 are either unassigned, or used for 
things such as MIDI mode changing. 

Due Process 

A useful application for a computer is 
a MIDI processor. This is where the 
MIDI signal is taken in, doctored in 
some way, and then either fed back 
to the source or sent on to another 
device. A harmoniser is a good exam- 
ple of MIDI processing. This is where 
the MIDI signal from an instrument is 
altered so note values are all raised 
or lowered by a certain amount. If this 
signal is fed back to the IN socket of 
the source instrument, each note 
played on its keyboard produces a 
simple two-part harmony. 

This function is provided by the 
program of listing 3. Although this is 
an Amiga BASIC program, it loads 
machine code which does all the pro- 
cessing. Amiga BASIC is really too 
slow for this type of thing, and there 



LISTING 3 - MIDI HARMONISER 



REM MIDI Harmoniser Program 
POKEW 14676018&,114 

INPUT "Enter offset in semitones ", offset 
offset=offset+256 
POKEW 14676122&,8228 
ba=200000& 
FOR loop=l TO 57 
READ v(l) 
POKEW ba,v(I) 
ba=ba+2 
NEXT loop 
ba=200000& 

POKEW 200098&, offset 

PRINT "Press left mouse button and play 
note to exit" 






are difficulties in reading the serial 
port on a byte by byte basis anyway. 
Attempts to overload the machine 
code routine proved fruitless. 

When asked to enter the note off- 
set it is alright to use a negative num- 
ber if the additional notes must be 
lower in pitch than the originals. A 
value of 5 or 12 will give a pleasant 
effect. Don't worry about the mouse 
'dying' when the machine code pro- 
gram is running - it will come back to 
life when you exit the program. When 
using this program, remember that 
the MIDI output of the instrument 
must connect to the input of the MIDI 
interface, and the output of the inter- 
face must be connected back to the 
MIDI input of the instrument. 




CALL ba 

POKEW 14676122&, 4i 
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To save you trouble, ST Amiga Format has arranged a special kit 
offer with Magenta Electronics: 

Kit 1 - all components in this list except the case: £14.95 inclusive 
of VAT and p&p. 

Kit 2 - as kit 1 but complete with a drilled case and tasteful ST 
Amiga Format labels, as in the photograph below: £19.95 inclu- 
sive. (You don't need the case for the kit to work, but it's obviously 
a good protection for the circuitry inside). 

Send your orders direct to: ST Amiga Format MIDI Offer, 
Magenta Electronics, 135 Hunter Street, Burton-on-Trent, Staffs 
DEI 4 2ST, or phone 0283 65435 with your credit card details. 

IMPORTANT: unless you specifically ask for an A1000 version 
you will get plugs suitable for the A500/A2000. 

Please allow 21 days for delivery. 

If you do want to shop around for yourself, one source of elec- 
tronic components is Maplin Electronics in Essex. You'll find their 
catalogue for sale in most branches of WH Smiths. 





PARTS LIST 



RESISTORS (all 0.25 Watt, 5% or better} 




CAPACITOR 


Rl r RU 


5k6 (2 off} 


green, blue, red, gold 


CI 


R2 


IkS 


brown, grey, red, gold 




R14 


220Q 


red, red, brown, gold 


MISCELLANEOUS 


R3toR9 t R13,R19,R20 


Ik (10 off} 


brown, black, red, gold 


SKI to SK5 


R1Q, R12 


lk5 (2 off} 


brown, red, orange, gold 




R15 


12k 


brown, red, orange, gold 


PL1 


R16, RX7 


3fc9 (2 off} 


orange, white, red, gold 




RIB 


4k7 


yellow, violet, red, gold 




The gold band at the end of all the resistor colour codes means 5% toler- 




ance. A red band means 


2%, and brown 1% 


- either of these is quite sat- 




isfactory to use. 








SEMICONDUCTORS 








IC1 


6N139 


Opto-isolator (Integrated 
circuit) 




TR1, TR2 t TR3, TR4 


BC547 (4 off} 


Transistors 




01 


1N414S 


Diode 





lOuF 25V radial electrolytic 



5 way ISO' DIN 

mounting 

25-way D connector (see 

model of Amiga). 

Printed circuit board 

Case about 180x120x40mm 

8-pin d.i.l integrated circuit holder 

66A 12.5mm bolts, nuts and 6.5mm spacers 

(3 of each) 

1mm diameter printed circuit pins 

1 metre of 4-way cable 

1 suitable grommet 

solder 



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LIGHTS! 

CAMERA! 

ACTION! 



Wipes, fades, cuts, flips... they're not Olympic high diving 
styles, they're features offered by Aegis' new 'desktop 
presentation' software. Ben Taylor admires the show. 



Lights! Camera! Action! 

£57.50 ■ Amiga only, requires 1MB ■ Aegis/HB Marketing, Brooklyn House, 22 The Green, West Drayton, 
Middx UB7 7PQ (0895 444433) 



Commodore have long pro- 
claimed, slightly pretentiously 
some might say, that Desktop 
Publishing is only a small part of the 
greater world of 'Desktop 
Presentation'. The theme is that the 
Amiga is the ultimate tool for convert- 
ing your imagination into a combined 
audio-visual extravaganza. Whether 
you're a graphics designer looking to 
make up a stunning demo of your 
work, or a businessman making a 
sales pitch, Lights 1 . Camera! Action! 
aims to give you that ability. 

L!C!A! allows you to define a 
'script' of still pictures, sounds and 
animation clips. A sequence might be 
(1) start some background sitar 
music; (2) display the logo of the Taj 
Mahal restaurant; (3) fade into a pic- 
ture of a steaming curry; (4) cut to 
animation of a waiter approaching 
with the bill; (5) fade with a diamond 
pattern effect to a picture of the 
washing up by the sink. 

In short, L!C!A! is a tool for creat- 
ing slide shows from still pictures and 
music. It isn't a full animation package 
in the sense of defining two pictures 
generating all the intermediate frames 
automatically. 

Still crazy 

L!C!A! takes still images from any 
standard Amiga picture file: low reso- 
lution, high resolution, HAM mode, the 
little-known 'Extra Halfbrite' mode, and 
any interlaced version of these. 

The standard 320 by 256 (or 
640 by 256 in medium/high res) pixel 
display doesn't normally fill the entire 
Amiga screen, but because the end 
result is supposed to be a TV-style 
presentation, possibly for recording 
to videotape, L!C!A! uses a technique 
called 'Overscan' to allow you to dis- 
play images up to 768 by 600 pixels 
such that they bleed smoothly off the 
edge of the screen as a normal TV 
picture does. (How you create these 
oversized pictures is your problem - 



most paint packages will only save in 
the standard size. However, Photon 
Paint, the DigiView 3.0 digitiser and 
Deluxe Paint II can all work at the larg- 
er size.) Different sizes of picture are 
handled well; you can mix overscan 
and ordinary size images, PAL 
(256/512 line) and NTSC (200/400 
line) screens all in the same script, 
and they will be properly centred in 
the screen. You can even intercut with 
video pictures if you have Genlock 
hardware. 

Stills can be displayed for any 
time that you choose - the fun of it all 
comes in how it gets to the screen. 
You can fade it in, 'wipe' it over an 
existing picture in any of 9 directions. 
You can gradually convert one picture 
into another with a pixel 'dissolve', 
introduce it via a pattern of diamonds 
or triangles which gradually merge 
together, or create a window within 
one picture and scroll a second one 
up it. When one picture flips to anoth- 
er the transition is almost instanta- 
neous, but the wipe effects are a bit 
jaggy as they slide across the screen. 

You can split the display into two 
'multiple viewport' screens so that 
two pictures are scrolled together, 
each with their own colour palette 
and/or colour cycling effects active. 

Sounds good 

The range of sounds that L!C!A! can 
play are geared mainly toward sound- 
tracks created with the Aegis Sonix 
package, though any 'SMUS'-format 
picture file can be included. 
Unfortunately, this format limits you to 
composed notes played through the 
sound chips, it cannot deal with digi- 
tised sounds. There is no direct way 
of including, for example, an explo- 
sion noise at suitable points. 

The music you can include in your 
presentations is therefore determined 
by what music package you own, 
Sonix being preferred. You can play 
the tune either as a once-off, or 



repeating in the background until the 
video script ends. 

Although you can't alter the 
instruments with which a saved score 
is played, you can change its pitch, 
volume and timing. 

Animations 

Provided with L!C!A! is a utility called 
GrabAnim, a 'grabber' tool to allow 
you to put an animation together in a 
format that can be played smoothly. 
You really need a joystick to use it: 
with GrabAnim running in the back- 
ground, you press the Fire button to 
grab a screen, which is then added to 
the current stored set. 

In conjunction with a paint pack- 
age, this can give you a slick way of 
doing simple animations - just grab 
each frame as you move it to its new 
position. GrabAnim stores the data in 
a compressed format, so you don't 
take up a whole screen's worth of 
disk space if there are only minor 
changes between frames. You can 
use this method with text to good 
effect: if you add one letter to a 
screen on text for each animation 
frame you grab, then the animation 
makes the message appear as if it is 
being typed in real-time. 

With a simple image, L!C!A! will 



M^fl P * -*♦• 




GENLOCKS 

A Genlock, constantly referred 
to in graphics articles, is a 
piece of hardware which allows 
your computer to mix its 
graphics with a TV or video 
recorder's pictures, creating 
the kind of effects you see on 
the Chart Show or Network 7. 
Genlocks cost around £200 
for the Amiga, and there are 
none we know of for the ST. 



I SIiovj Still 1 T i Me : 



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ANIM- Repeat: 



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■ The main script editing screen for Lights! Camera! Action! You 
can control the 'wipes' from here - the special effects for how the 
pictures are faded in and out. 




REVIEW 



GETTING GOING 

We used arrA2000 to review 
Lights! Camera! Action! with, 
and there's one problem you 
will need to know about. All the 
demo files assume you are 
using an A500/A1 000 whose 
disk drives are DFO and DF1. 
The A200O'a external drive is 
called OF2, and the demos 
won't work. You need to edit 
the. STARTUP-SEQUENCE file 
to include the line ; - j* 

: . : uF'.z. 



display around half a dozen frames 
per second from GrabAnimmed files. 

The verdict 

The major problem with L!C!A! is text 
handling. If you want to make up text 
screens to introduce a picture, or 
even add captions to pictures, there 
is just no way you can do it. You have 
to use an art package to save the 
text screen as a picture, or edit the 
captions into the images, by hand. 
Obviously this takes up more disk 
space than text alone really deserves, 
and is a major omission in an other- 
wise extremely well-designed pack- 
age. The other annoyance, as has 
been pointed out, is not being able to 
include digitised sounds in a demo. 

Overall, L!C!A! is a package that is 
superbly simply to use and can cre- 
ate impressive rolling demos of any 
graphic screens. It just lacks the flexi- 
bility, especially in its poor text han- 
dling, to be a vital business tool, and 
it doesn't really try to be a top-flight 
animation program. Electronic Arts' 



GO FASTER STRIPES 

When you start to put together complex presentations, particularly 
if you want to flip from one stilt to the next quite rapidly, you are 
going to start being frustrated by the fact that the Amiga's disk 
drives are slower than the speeding bullet. To load a picture from 
disk can take three or four seconds, which is therefore effectively 
the shortest possible display time. 

To help minimise this, UC!A! has the idea of 'buffers'. You can 
have up to 99 buffers, each holding a picture, animation or music 
score in memory. While one picture is being displayed, you load 
another into a buffer so that when the time comes to display it, the 
results are pretty much instantaneous. The drawback is, of course, 
that you need lots of memory to hold one picture in reserve while 
another is being displayed. Even with 1MB you'll be pushed to 
buffer many pictures up. 

Once your demo is all finished, there is a stand-alone 'player' 
program so that you can distribute the show to people without 
LICIA! 



Deluxe Video (see issue 2) is a more 
sophisticated tool in these areas, and 
can run on an unexpanded A500, but 
is much harder to use. 

However, any would-be artist will 
find it a matter of minutes to knock 
up an impressive demo, and simplici- 
ty is something to be highly valued. 




for 

I Simple to use 

I Displays TV-size 'overscan' 

pictures 
l Wide range of fade/wipe 

etc effects 
l Animation creator utility 

included 
I Pics with 2 different 

colour palettes displayed 



against 

No way to add text within 

L!C!AI 

No way to include 

digitised sounds 

Needs 1 Megabyte of 

RAM 




■ If ifs Tuesday it must be Hyderabad... a World tour courtesy of Lights! 
Camera 1 . Action!. Starting in China, a diamond fade cuts to Manhattan's towers. 
A horizontal wipe takes you into Gay Paree - this doesn't use the multiple 
viewport features, so the palette of the New York picture has been messed up 
by the next picture's palette. The next fade, into Holland, does use multiple 
viewports so the windmill's palette is correct as it wipes from the centre over 
the old picture. 



re m^e^P 

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4& #| | ^ 1 




A CLASSIC ADVENTURE GAME 
FROM PSYGNOSIS 



• FULL ICON CONTROL 

• BRILLIANT GRAPHICS 

• FIENDISH PLOTS 

• A RACE AGAINST TIME 

• 4 DISKS ATARI. 3 DISKS- AMIGA 

• IBM VERSION - COMING SOON 

CHRONO-QUEST 

This is the first of a new generation of adventure games from Psygnosis. An 
adventure game in the classic sense. 

Your quest begins in your fathers chateau circa 1920, there you find (or 
should find) your fathers latest invention; a fantastic time machine. Your 
father is dead, murdered, you are the prime suspect. A letter left by your 
father leads you to think the real culprit was Richard, his not so faithful 
servant. But he has escaped to the future using the time machine . . . who 
will believe your fantastic story ... do you believe it? 

You will be presented with many objectives; ultimately you will have to 
travel through time to collect the fragments of magnetic card to drive the 
Time Machine into the future. There you will have to . . . Meanwhile, the 
immediate objective is to find the time machine . . . Sorry, a more immediate 
objective is to find the room with the time machine in it . . . But its dark . . . Very 
sorry, an even more immediate objective is to be able to see where you are 
going ... 3 hours and 250 minutes and even more immediate objectives 
later, you are standing in the hallway thinking . . . hellpppp!!!!!!! 

ATARI ST/AMIGA/IBM - £29.95 



Screen Shots are from the ST. version. 



JL— *^e- " V »-- -v *.-v- c- + 

JriT . lis 




ftJPS 




I 

1 




T 
t 




-» — N» "^ ■ n % — £ — - — * — X v «v — ^^T* 


m 





Psygnosis 
FREEPOST 
Liverpool L3 3AB 
United Kingdom 
Tel. No: 051-207 0825 



KS 




■■»■■■ 






MUSIC 





mi 




MUSIC 



APRES 
MIDI 



So you've got a headful of great tunes and a MIDI system 
— what happens next? Chris Jenkins explains a few tips of 
the trade for recording your inspiration, and how to 
make money from your compositions. 



Over the last few issues we've 
looked in detail at the marvel- 
lous things you can achieve 
with a computer-based music system, 
using MIDI and electronic instru- 
ments. We've explained the theories 
behind the software and hardware, 
and shown you how to set up a studio 
system. 

So there you are, sitting in front 
of your computer and your synthesis- 
ers, itching to make a start What on 
earth do you do next? As you go 
deeper into the practice of recording 
and music, you'll have to keep 
remembering that this is a computer 
magazine! Just bear in mind that your 
ST or Amiga can help you along with 
almost every aspect of creating 
music, from creating the original 
sounds to typing the labels for the 
cassettes. 

Master tapes 

If you create a wonderful picture on 
your computer, it remains fairly point- 



less unless you incorporate it into a 
game or a demo of some sort. In the 
same way, a piece of computerised 
music is pretty useless until you turn 
it into a form where it can be enjoyed 
by other people; usually, an audio 
cassette, vinyl record or compact 
disk. Incidentally, this is also a popu- 
lar way to make money out of the 
whole business! 

You can always book time in a 
professional studio to make your 
recordings, but with plunging equip- 
ment costs it's now possible to build 
up a pretty good recording system in 
your own home. 

Good quality recording equipment 
needn't cost thousands of pounds, 
although the 24- and 48-track 
recorders used in large studios will 
remain outside the budgets of most 
of us. 16-tracks such as the Fostex 
B16, though, are becoming pretty 
affordable, and remember that the 
classic Beatles album Sgt Pepper 
was recorded on just two 4-tracks! If 




■ Yamaha's idea of a simple little 8-track home studio, as featured in the 1988 PC show. Does your bedroom 
look like this? 



34 ■ FORMAT 



you simply want to tape what you 
play live, any good-quality hi-fi cas- 
sette deck (preferably using metal 
formula tapes and Dolby noise reduc- 
tion) will do the job. However, if you 
want to record complex pieces, you'll 
need to multi-track. 

Multi-tracking 

Multi-track tape machines allow you 
to make several synchronised record- 
ings on one tape, listening each time 
to the previous tracks so that you can 
build up a complete piece working on 
your own. As we've remarked in the 
past, it's often best to buy second- 
hand, if you can find well-serviced 
equipment. Multi-track recorders 
come in many forms. Early models, 
such as the TEAC 3340/3440, used 
quarter-inch open-reel tape, and were 
intended to play 'quadrophonic' music 
- a fad which never caught on. 
Instead, musicians started to use 
them to multi- track, and you can still 
pick up these excellent 4-track 




■ Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts 
Club Band was recorded on a 4-track 
mixer - state of the art in 1967! 
Equipment of the same spec is rela- 
tively cheap nowadays, so there's no 
reason you can't make your own 
concept albums! 

machines at around £300. 

You'll probably also need an audio 
mixer, which will allow you to connect 
all your instruments into the recorder, 
then combine the results onto a 
stereo master tape. Mixers can be 
shockingly expensive, though there 
are cheap models from Seek, Icon 
and Boss. Look out too for Tandy mix- 
ers which are designed for use in dis- 
cos, but which can be adapted for 
recording uses. A popular alternative 
is the Portastudio-type combined 




■ Yamaha MT100 4-track cassette mixer/recorder, at around £250. this is a 
good entry level combination console for the home enthusiast. 



mixer/4-track recorder. Tascam intro- 
duced the concept, and prices now 
start at around £215, including the 
Fostex XI 5, Tascam Porta-05 and 
Vesta MR10. Most of these units fea- 
ture four to six input channels, so if 
you want you can plug in an entire 
band. Each input channel has tone 



controls for bass, treble, and some- 
times mid-range. 

Some portastudios also feature 
effects sends. These allow you to 
wire in a digital reverb or delay unit to 
'sweeten' the instrument sounds. 
Predictably, there are now 8-track 
cassette portastudios on the market, 



COMPOSITION TECHNIQUE 

Without going into too much superfluous detail about compositional theory, 
let's assume that you have your own ideas about the style and character of 
your music. Normally, recordings are built up from the bottom; drums first, 
then bass, then chords, melodies, and finally the vocal (if any) and accompa- 
niments. Ideally, you should record with no more effects than are needed to 
get the sounds on tape with good level and tone control. The effects should 
be added in the final mix. 

In practice, unless you have stacks of equipment, you will have to add 
some effects as you record; maybe a bit of reverb on the drums, digital or 
tape delay on your solos, a touch of both on the vocal. Remember that many 
effects units, such as the Alesis MIDlverb, can be controlled by your 
sequencer, changing effect type as and when needed in the piece. By mixing 
and remixing the multi-track (or editing and re-editing your raw sequences) 
you can change the entire sound of your music. Study the sounds and tech- 
niques used on chart and other records, then add your own ideas. 



produced by Toa and Tascam. They 
both cost around £1200, which 
sounds like a lot, but is probably the 
cheapest way to get into 8-track 
recording. For comparison, a half-inch 
tape 8-track recorder such as the 
Tascam 38 would cost you around 
£1500, and a suitable mixer around 
£450. 

Your computer can help you at 
the mixing stage, too. Systems such 
as MegaMix and Twister can allow 
your ST (and soon the Amiga) to 
memorise and repeat mixer settings 
for each channel, allowing you to get 
a perfect mix every time. These sys- 
tems, though, only work with pretty 
sophisticated mixers incorporating 
'insert point' features. 

Synchronisation 

Another major problem when comput- 
ers meet tape recorders is in track 
synchronisation. If you have only one 
synth, but want to record a piece of 
music with several distinct 
sequences, how do you synchronise 
them on subsequent 'takes'? Counting 
yourself in and hitting the PLAY button 
at the right time rarely works! 

The solution lies in boxes such as 
the Korg KMS-30 tape-to-MIDI syn- 
chroniser. This £129 unit converts 



O 



MUSIC 



SYNC OR SWIM 

"Beware! Some software 
sequencers - such as 
Microdeal's Superconductor 
and Kuma's K-Minstrel - can't 
read external MIDI clock sig- 
nals, so you can't use the syn- 
chronisation method described 
in the main text with them. 
Always investigate thoroughly 
before buying software. 



PING-PONG RECORDING 

You can build up complex recordings on a small multi-track by 
'ping-ponging'. Start by recording on tracks one, two, and three. 
Re-record these onto track four, and your first three tracks are 
free again. Record on tracks one and two, and re-record those to 
track three; then fill up track two, then track one. If you also add 
new bits of music live on each 'take', you can end up with at least 
ten tracks on your 4-track machine. 

You can apply the same sort of principle to 'track bouncing' 
from one simple stereo cassette deck to another, but the record- 
ing quality soon becomes unacceptable. 







j/jjmiiuumm\\\\\\\ 




l Allen & Heath's 16-8-2 mixer, ideal for the 8-track studio. 







5 





MUSIC 



BLOW YOUR 
MIND 

Whichever recording system 
you end up with, you'll need 
loads of accessories such as 
leads, plug blocks, tapes, 
headphones, microphones, 
stands, and of course an ampli- 
fier and speakers to hear what 
you're doing. A decent hi-fi 
amplifier and speakers will do 
to start off with, but you can 
blow up your speakers if you 
push the bass too high, so 
think of investing in decent 
speakers such as Yamaha NS- 
20 monitors. 




MIDI clock pulses into an audio sig- 
nal, and vice-versa, As your first track 
of music is recorded, the KMS-30 
reads clock pulses from your soft- 
ware sequencer, and puts out a 
series of high-speed beeps which you 
record on a spare track. If the tempo 
of the sequence changes, the beeps 
will speed up or slow down to match. 
On subsequent takes, the KMS-30 
reads the audio pulses from your syn- 
chronisation track, and transforms 
them into MIDI clock pulses which 
your sequencer can respond to. 

A fringe benefit is that the KMS- 
30 can also generate a '24/48 pulse- 
per-quarter- note' signal, allowing you 
to synchronise older Roland and Korg 
equipment such as the TR-808 or 
DDM1 10/220 drum machines. 
Yamaha, XRI and several other make 
comparable boxes. A similar tech- 
nique can be used to synchronise pat- 
terns programmed into MIDI drum 
machines. Although some synth mod- 
ules, such as the Roland MT-32 and 
DUO, now come with built-in drum 
sounds which you can play with your 
sequencer, there are plenty of great- 
sounding beat-boxes like the Roland 
TR707/909/626, and Yamaha 
RX21/17, which allow you to create 
complex rhythm patterns and songs 
in their internal memory. 

Still on the subject of tape syn- 
chronisation, you'll also hear talk of 
SMPTE (Society of Motion Picture and 
Television Engineers) synchronisation. 
This is a complex digital time-code 
system designed to sync music to 
video, and although SMPTE/MIDI 
units such as the XRI XR300 are 
becoming less expensive and 
straightforward, they're a bit beyond 
our scope here. 

Getting it taped 

When recording music, the best 
advice is to plan out in minute detail 
what you're going to do, before you 
do it. Many software sequencers 
allow you to enter synth patch num- 
bers, track names, and even in some 



36 M FORMAT 



cases little memos. If you don't have 
these facilities, make a 'track sheet' 
and fill in all the instrument names 
and sound patches, the order in 
which you mean to do the takes, the 
'ping-ponging' instructions (see the 
separate box) and so forth. That way, 
you'll avoid recording on the wrong 
track and wiping out two hours' work, 
Let's assume you've recorded 
your piece, added all the necessary 
effects, and mixed it down onto a 
stereo master tape. Unless you can 
afford a quarter-inch mastering 
machine such as the Revox B77 or 
Tascam 32, you will probably have 
ended up with a standard audio cas- 
sette. This is fine, because everyone 
has a cassette player, and not every- 
one has a quarter-inch stereo tape 
machine! So now what are you going 
to do with your music? Maybe you are 
just in it for your own entertainment. 
Fair enough, but most of you will want 
your performances heard. There are 
loads of possibilities, but, as with any 
other venture, it pays to do a little 
research in advance. 

Marketing 

If you are interested in the production 
side of music, rather than perfor- 
mance, you can advertise your ser- 
vices as a studio facility. Why not 
make back some of the money you've 
spent on your equipment? Advertise 
in local papers, or publications such 
as Melody Maker or Music Mart 

If your clients have access to a 
computer, stress the convenience of 
doing the programming at home, then 
booking studio time and taking in the 
data disks to finish the recordings. 
The going rate for a 4-track studio is 
about £2 per hour, 8-tracks £5, and 
16 tracks £10, depending on the 
amount of gear you have to offer, the 
area, and the amount of time a band 
want to spend working. 

If you want to promote your own 
music, work out the most promising 
market. Let's say your interests are in 
pop music, and your ambition is to 



JINGLE BELLS 



It's possible, of course, that you're happy to stay out of the spotlight, and 
would like to make music for films, TV and other commercial outlets. This 
can be staggeringly remunerative; one of the members of funk band Heaven 
17 spoke recently of making £25,000 for four days' work on a car company 
commercial. Sounds good, but of course this sort of work demands the high- 
est standards of professionalism and recording quality. It's no good sending 
Dixons' cassettes in to ad agencies. Again, the Music Week Directory is a 
good source of contacts; dozens of jingle companies are listed, and if you 
want more advice on this area you can contact the Musicians Union on 01- 
582 5566. 

In the meantime, listen very carefully to film soundtracks, ad jingles, TV 
theme tunes, and so on. Approach organisations such as drama groups, hos- 
pital radio stations and 'talking magazines', and see if you can offer them 
your musical services. With a few commissions under your belt, you'll have a 
better idea of how the market works. 

Many musicians make an excellent living out of 'library music'. 
Companies such as KPM and Bruton make albums of instrumental music 
available for hire to all sections of the media. If they like your music, you can 
sit back and rake in the royalties as your music is used in everything from 
toilet paper commercials to training films. 



have a hit single, appear on Top of 
the Pops and be mobbed by school- 
girls. (And why not?) The traditional 
method of getting ahead is to make a 
demo tape, send it to a record com- 
pany, and wait for the contract offers 
to come rolling in. 

Since everyone does this, you will 
probably have to go one better if you 
don't want your musical efforts to end 
up in the 'slush pile'. Some basic 
rules; select three (magic number) of 
your best pieces. Don't do any cover 
versions, and don't vary the style too 
much; record companies look for a 
strong sense of identity in an artist. 
Make sure your cassette is well pre- 
sented, with neat labelling, and is 
accompanied by a good photo of 
yourself and/or your band. Don't give 
way to the temptation to include a 24- 
page artistic manifesto with your tape 
- it'll end up in the bin. 

Name dropping 

There are several invaluable sources 
of record company contacts. The 
best is the Music Week Directory, 
published by Spotlight (01-387 6611) 
which is an annual publication listing 
record companies, recording studios, 
manufacturers and other industry ser- 
vices. It costs £15 from bookshops, 
or your local library should be able to 
get it. For more direct information on 
record companies, try the Making 
Music A&R List. Available from 
Making Music magazine (01-251 
1900) for the price of a big s.a.e., 
this lists record companies major and 
minor, their latest signings, what sort 
of music they're looking for at the 
moment, and addresses and phone 
numbers. A&R (Artists and 
Repertoire) personnel change jobs 
with miraculous rapidity, so don't 
expect the list to stay up to date too 
long. 

If you're genuinely interested in a 
pop music career, consider pressing 
your own single. It can work out fairly 
cheaply - around £400 for 1000 7- 
inch singles with white labels and 
plain sleeves. Sleeve artwork, 
coloured labels and so forth all start 
to bring up the costs, but that isn't 
necessary if your records are going 
to be sent out to music magazines, 
radio stations, TV stations and inde- 
pendent local radio in the hope of air- 
play (refer to Music Week Directory 
again). 

The two great advantages are (a) 
record companies will take you more 
seriously, and definitely listen to your 
single, and (b) you may get radio air- 
play, which you will never, ever, get 
with a cassette demo. 

If you are interested in less obvi- 
ously commercial music - say New 
Age or folk - make sure to approach 
record companies specialising in 
those fields. There's not much point 
sending a demo of a lilting, lyrical 
ambient piece to a Thrash Metal 
label. 



FUNNY 
BUSINESS 



<&' 



Cartoon drawing is no laughing matter. Ian Bennett 
explains the ten steps to becoming an electronic Bill 
Tidy. All you need is a paint package, a computer, and a 
little inside knowledge. ■ mm 



_/ M 



H 



ave you ever wished you could 
draw your own colour car- 
toons, or even more exciting, 
comic strip adventures complete with 
a D.I.Y. superhero of your choice? 
Armed with your super-power 16 bit 
paint package of your choice, and a 
bit (perhaps a lot) of time, you can do 
just that. All the pictures in these 
pages were hand drawn using a 
palette of 16 colours. In fact, the 
workhorse was an Amiga 500 with 
Deluxe Paint 2, although they are all 
fairly simple and basic and almost any 
paint package on either ST or Amiga 
would do. 

So just how do you go about 
drawing your own cartoon? Let's look 
at the stages involved in drawing the 
final frame incorporating our some- 
what skinny but ever-so-dynamic hero, 
Virus Destroyer, or 'VD' to his friends. 




action, shading and all other elements 
that combine to create a single frame. 
Study over Aand then create your 
character as you wish (or copy anoth- 
er) and then make a basic pencil 
sketch noting your main colours, 
shadow areas, action lines and 
speech areas. If a series of frames is 
involved then composition of the 
whole page comes into play... but 
that's another story ! 

(2) Switch on 

Before loading your art package 
ensure that you have a supply of 
ready formatted disks to save your 
work. It is all too easy to get carried 
away with the creative urge and forget 
the essentials, ending up with 
nowhere to save your labours! 

For your first attempts, you will 
probably find it useful to draw the 
black outlines for the cartoon on a 
piece of paper. This will give you a 
size guide for positioning the different 
elements of the picture at the right 
place on the screen. After a while 
you'll be able to draw the picture 
directly on the screen. 

Have all your reference books, 
colour charts, preliminary sketches 
and inspirational work handy. Clear 
away the half empty coffee cups, put 
cut the cat, the wife/husband, settle 
down and switch on. 

(3) Palette 

Setting up a definitive palette at the 
start is not vital, since you can always 
change it, but preparing major colours 
like the red, yellow and blue of V.D.'s 
uniform is advisable. Set the screen 
background colour to a fairly neutral, 
restful shade to avoid eyestrain... you 
could be in front of the screen for 
some hours, maybe days. Don't have 
a black background because black is 
needed for drawing lines, and white 
for speech balloons and highlights. If 
your character has body parts show- 
ing, then a flesh colour (human, alien 
or otherwise) will be needed. Always 
try to leave spare colours for the vari- 
ous shades of the main ones that will 



.RUS 



MANIAC 
WACK&RS 



>vi 






(£m) 




ml- The line 
sketch for our 
superhero, 
Virus Destroyer, 
or V.D. to his 
friends. 

crop up as a drawing progresses. Be 
prepared to continually modify and re- 
mix shades as you proceed. It is one 
of the joys of computer art! 

(4) - Box it 

Usually your cartoon or illustration will 
be inside a box. Using a fairly wide 
square brush and the hollow rectangle 
command, set up your drawing area 
to whatever shape is required. It is 
important to remember that if you 



^y 



WHICH ST 
SOFTWARE? 



l - Tl i ^in < jjui"3Tdilpa-Mg^ 

are: 

Neochrome (Atari), £29.95 

Degas (Electronic Arts), 

Sp-frvm5C©ifllfimOClO 

£59.55 

Art Studio (Rainbird), £24.95 



19^5 irTCT. Him tJITecn 
GFA Artist (Michtron), £49.95 
Quantum Paint (Eidersoft), 
£24.95 

Cyber Paint (Electric), £69.95 
Easy Draw 2 (Electnc 
Distribution), £59.95 



TIPS OF THE TRADE 

Solid black outlines and dark shadows play an important part in 
most comic pictures. Look at the way simple black lines are used 
to denote muscles, for instance on the biceps or thighs. Look for 
areas of shadow particularly under the neck, arms, rib cage and 
also the way that thick black tines and shadow combine to create 
that superhero chest. Solid muscle 1 . In the examples drawn on 
these pages, shadow is strongly evident in body parts behind the 
main action, as in the VD final frame with the rear arm and lower 
raised leg. 

The use of solid black lines eliminates the need for complex 
colour shades and if you have only 1 6 colours as with the Amiga 
medium resolution or ST low resolution, they soon get used up. In 
the VD final frame there is only one shade each of blue, yellow 
and red used. Black shadow and lines combine to create the 3D 
effect 



FORMAT M 37 



, 



h i 



GRAPHICS 



intend to have explosive action, body 
parts or speech breaking out of the 
box boundaries, then you must leave 
sufficient space must on the screen 
to accommodate it. You soon see the 
need for that preliminary pape^ 
sketch. 

(5) Let's draw 

At last! If you are keen on art, you win 
presumably already have some 
knowledge of perspective, composi- 
tion, figure work etc. If you haven't, 
then you would be wise to obtain 
some from a decent drawing or 
sketch book. Whilst comic and car- 
toon work can sometimes flout the 
general laws of drawing, it is easier 
to learn to draw first and then to 
learn to draw 'comics'. Getting a 3-D 
effect is easy when you know how, 
impossible when you don't. 

Having set up the drawing box 
select a thin brush, colour black and 
pick your starting point. Proceed to \ 
'sketch' with the mouse. Keeping 
your eyes on the screen and with fair- 
ly rapid movements, outline the main 
picture as you would with a pencil on 
paper. If drawing an action figure as 
our V.D. is, start with a 'stick man' 
which captures the main flow of 
movement. Basic background items 
can be put in to complete the rough 
sketch, using the line drawing com- 
mand where you can, but otherwise 
with freehand sketching. 

Don't waste time at this stage 
removing all unnecessary or incor- 
rect lines. Sketching with the mouse 
takes practice, so do not give up! 

'Fleshing out' is the next step, ie. 
putting a body and relevant clothing, 
uniform, gadgets, weaponry etc (still 
fairly roughly) onto the stick man. If 
you hero is a muscle-man type, there 
will be lots of curves to draw for 
bulging biceps an so on. You could 
try to use the curve drawing com- 
mands of your art package, but 
many people prefer to draw these 
free hand instead since they will prob- 
ably be redrawn when the detail 
stage is reached later. But feel free 
to experiment for yourself. 

In drawing a face, you may wish 
to insert a centre guideline through 
the nose and also an eye line passing 
through the centre of the eyes. 
These lines can easily be removed by 
'overdrawing' with the relevant flesh 
or other colour once the mouth, nose 
and eyes are finished. 

Weapons will usually be based on 
straight lines, and a simple set of line 
and box commands can be used to 
create the weapon's outline. 

Now before you do anything 
else, SAVE IT!!! 

(6) Now undraw 

After the end of the last stage, you 
will have a mass of Jines on screen 
(especially if there is a background 
scene) - the sense of which is only 

38 ■ FORMAT 




- 



-. m —**. 



WHICH AMIGA 
-SOFTWARE? 



The major Amiga art pack- 
ages are: 

Deluxe Paint It (Electronic 
Arts), £69.95 
Deluxe Phototab (Electronic 
Arts), £69.95, needs 1MB of 



Digt Paint (NewTek/HB 
Marketing), £59.95 
Photon Paint 

Express Paint (Brown 
pa Cpntre 



snn.nni 




apparent to you. Hidden amongst the 
spaghetti will be your hero desperate 
to reveal himself (Shocking! And this 
a family magazine - Ed). 

So now, we undraw. Select back- 
ground colour, the largest brush size 
you need and 'draw over' all the obvi- 
ously unnecessary lines. After remov- 
ing the major ones, eg. the sticks 
from your stick man, use the magnify 
command and zoom in to remove 
other lines. Keep removing lines and 
doing minor redrawing until you are 
left with a figure that's rough around 
the edges but a pretty reasonable 
outline sketch. Save it again and take 
a break! 

(7) A bit of colour 

Adding some colour at this stage will 
let you feel that you are getting 



packages with Undo command! 

Do not add too much colour at 
this stage. Start with the main areas 
like the head, chest and arms. You 
can also insert the main areas of 
shadow such as rear arm, raised rear 
leg and ribs. 



(8) Magnify and 
detail 

This is the stage at which the real 
drawing takes place. For the figure, 
add detail from the head down. Use 
the magnify command, a small brush 
and first correct and establish the 
final shape for the head. Add the hel- 
met, main head shadow and 
shoulder areas. 

Working at increased magnifica- 
tion allows detailed work on the facial 




4 2- Start by 
drawing the cen- 
tre lines of your 
figure in stick 
fashion 

► 3 - Add the 
outlines for the 
limbs around the 
centre lines 




somewhere fast. The flood fill com- 
mand can, in seconds, change a 
mass of lines into a mass of coloured 
blobs. But at least, you will know 
what the blobs are. Check that all 
lines join up where necessary and 
use the magnify command to exam- 
ine all dubious bits. A slightly mis- 
placed pixel, especially after free- 
hand drawing, is extremely difficult to 
spot. You will soon know if there are 
any gaps that you were unaware of 
when the whole screen fills with the 
wrong colour. Thank heavens paint 



and other features. The amount of 
detail depends greatly on the final 
purpose for the picture and its ulti- 
mate size. One of the arts in cartoon- 
ing, is to only put in sufficient details 
to create the impression required. 
Many top cartoonists use very few 
lines to create their figures with, and 
fine detail is lost anyway if the results 
are printed small. 

Detailed work ultimately comes 
down to using the magnify command 
and small brush to work pixel by 
pixel. Good art packages display the 




■ 4 -It lives, Dr. Frankenstein... colouring in the head brings friendly V.D. to a 
semblance of life. The menus and palette reveal this as a Deluxe Paint II 
production, but you could use any art package on any machine. 




I 5 - Add in a background colour and some black 'motion' lines 



magnified and unmagnified portions 
on screen at once - always keep an 
eye on the un-magnified image to see 
the effect of your actions. Repeat this 
detailed work for the rest of the pic- 
ture, using the preliminary sketch as a 
basis and redrawing, correcting and 
finishing as necessary. 

At the risk of becoming repeti- 
tions, SAVE IT NOW! 

(9) Backgrounds 

Having previously established any 
background details with the initial 
sketch, everything now comes down 
to the magnify and detail procedure. 
Don't be afraid to redraw detail, your 
preliminary sketch was only a sketch. 
Magnifying at this stage is also neces- 
sary to remove unwanted pixels left 
from the outline sketch. 

The amount of detail which goes 
into the background will depend upon 



the final purpose for the artwork. In 
the 'sleazy street' scene very little 
background detail was necessary 
despite the fact that the illustration 
shows a landscape scene. The fore- 
ground detail is the main focal point of 
the picture. 

If you wish to know how much 
detail to put in, again look at various 
comic strips especially the standard 
Superman and Batman type. You can 
see quite often that background 
details like buildings are represented 
simply by outlines with various colours 
used for obtaining depth; final detail 
itself is strictly limited. 

(lO) Speech and 
lettering 

Before going any further, make sure 
that you have saved the frame so far. 
You are almost finished... it's silly to 




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■ A selection of hatching patterns you might like to recreate and use to give 
texture and depth effects to areas of your cartoon. Select a pattern, modify the 
background colour to match the destination area, and use your paint package's 
copy commands to splash it over the parts you want. 





WASTE NOT WANT NOT 

Look for short cuts that allow you to re-use things you've already 
done. All paint packages have a copy command: if you spend 
some time perfecting a left eye, copy it to a blank area of the 
screen, then reflect it for use as a right eye. 

Amiga art packages, and also Degas among others on the ST, 
have a particularly powerful copy and move function called 'brush- 
es'. You can pick up any area of the screen and use that as a 
brush to draw with. The brush can be flipped, resized or rotated all 
without you needing to find a blank area of screen to use as a 
scratchpad. 

Looking at the completed strip at the end, the computer and 
telephone keys were all done with a 'key' brush, and the stencil 
command was used to draw underneath and out from Alfred's arm 
with the brush. 

If Leonardo had owned an Amiga perhaps the Mona Lisa 
wouldn't have had that lop sided smile? 




take risks now. 

Whilst drawing, consider the loca- 
tion of any lettering and speech bal- 
loons required. If you are uncertain 
where to locate the balloon then draw 
it separately, save it as a brush, and 
move it around the frame until it looT 
good, then click the mouse to fix it in 
position. The balloon shapes can be 
whatever you wish depending upon 
the desired effect. Freehand drawing 
will often give a better cartoon effect 
than using set shape commands, but 
boxes and ovals can be useful. 

As for lettering, well play around 
with whatever fonts you have avail- 
able. Experiment with bold, italic and 
any other features. The V.D. strip has 
a variety of fonts and spacings. 

If the words are not large enough 
then you can use the art package's 
stretch, rotate, reflect and other fea- 
tures to get the effect you want. 
Always fill the speech balloon with the 
background colour before inserting 
any lettering. Otherwise, you are left 
with all the centres of the letters to 
in individually. 




SHADY BUSINESS 

To break up a solid block of colour, some form of patterned 'hatch- 
ing' can be used. Sixteen colours don't always go far 1 . This is where 
paint packages with proper brush commands can really come into 
their own. Hatching, cross hatching, stippling and all the usual pen 
and ink effects can be reproduced on screen using the brush. In the 
V.D. strip you will see a lot of simple shading created just this way. 
ft also helps to maintain the standard 'drawn' comic look, as 
opposed to a precise computerised image. You can see an example 
of this by the doorway of the street scene in the finished V.D. strip. 

Ensure the background colour is the same as the area to be 
shaded or drawn onto the main background colour. Using magnify, 
if necessary, hatch a small area of screen by hand-drawing with the 
style of shading required. In the V.D. strip, the examples are a fairly 
rough effect, but you could use nice neat fines. Cut out the centre 
portion only as your brush, which prevents any edges appearing. 
Work with the brush over the area required jointing neatly or over- 
lapping where necessary for depth or effect. To remove the 
squared step effect at the edges of your shading, switch to a stan- 
dard circular brush with the right background colour and proceed 
to shape the edges as required {as in the Nu-Bodi frame). By 
enlarging, reducing, stretching . or rotating the hatching brush as 
needed a wide range of different effects can be produced. 
Experiment! 

Finally, bear in mind also the location of any lettering and 
speech balloons which you will put in later. H is a waste of time 
spending hours creating a finely detailed corner of the frame only 
to cover it up with a large white speech balloon. 





■ 6 - Drawing in the frame outline 
with a thick brush, leaving room for 
text to run beneath. 

Finally, if you have not already 
done so, add the background colour 
for the box. You should have left your- 
self at least one shade on the palette. 



Remix as necessary, you will be 
amazed at the effect that different 
colours in the box can have on the 
final impact of the frame 

Up, up and away 

So there you are, your own dazzling 
hero. All that remains now is to pre- 



serve your creation for posterity. If 
you don't have a colour printer you 
can photograph the screen, using an 
exposure time of about 1/2 a second 
which smooths out the scanning lines 
on the monitor display. 

Have fun... it's what comics and 
cartoons are all about! 




■ Picturesque language... a variety of speech bubbles. Text you want to empha- 
sise can be put in one of the more esoteric shapes. 



\ 



VIRUS DESTROYER 



VIRUS DESffDW 
1HE BEGINNING. 



ONCE UPON k-fltlE, VfcT 
TO COME , COMPUTER 
GAMING \WA% CMJo-ffeO 
TWaoUGHOuT ^WE KNOWK 
GALAXY. 

ONU b-lEU-Aft OA7 OVJ 
-fH£ PLANE* AMtCA, A 
SOLIDARY GAMER 
CAUiO ALFRED WAS 
LOCKED MtO A GAME.. 



UHAULB -TO ABANDON Wb. 
SCREEN FOR TWO MOWf^, 
M.FRED WAS NOW ON HCi 
BRINK OF FINDING TWE 
FINAL ANSWER WHfcN.. 




row, tLumnm 



ottcnwvijk 
- ■ ' ^ '-•<■ lawns antiim.. 



Out of the formless void comes a new kind of superhero, from initial sketch to final coloured screens. 



40 ■ FORMAT 






li^ftP* 



MULTIFACE ONE, the MULTIpurpose interFACE, was a sensation when originally released for the ZX Spectrum four years ago. 
MULTIFACE TWO, for the Amstrad CPC range, followed 2 years later — same pattern, same success. Now the time has come for the 
MULTIFACE ST — the BIG brother to the MULTIFACE famiiy. Same pattern? Yes, and with even more facilities! So, what can 
MULTIFACE ST do to make an ATARI ST owner's life so much easier? 



MULTIFACE ST is the ultimate PERSONAL COPIER. It copies programs, screens, disks - all at a touch of a button. 
Its most powerful MUL TI TOOLtilTlets you study St modify any program any time -just touch the sam e magic button. 

Mow is it done ? 



MULTIFACE is a small box that plugs into the cartridge port. It has all its tricks in a massive 64Kbyte ROM so you do NOT need to load any 
other software: MULTIFACE is always there and ready. It is menu-driven with one-touch commands and on-screen instructions, so easy to use. 
Pressing its magic button will interrupt any program and give you an overall control over it. You can save the entire program or just the screen. 
MULTIFACE compresses before saving and it formats disks with up to 25% gain, to make the contents of the computer fit onto a disk. 
The saved program will continue from where it was saved - save half-way through a game and avoid playing from the start again! 

The MULTI TOOLKIT lets you inspect and change (in hex, decimal and ASCII) absolutely everything — including the protected RAM and 
68000 registers! You can POKE infinite lives, customize programs, fill RAM, find/replace strings, even m/c instructions, etc. 



Being a hardware device, 'a magic box' MULTIFACE can back-up whatever you wish, as many times as you wish. 
HOWEVER, to prevent any piracy, which is illegal, the MULTIFACE MUST be attached to run programs it saved! 
MULTIFACE will be available from November 1988, making it an ideal Christmas present for any Atari ST owner! 



• • • 



SON, HERE IS THE MULTIFACE - 
THE ANSWER TO L/FE, 
NIVERSE RND EVERYTHING ! ! 

CmV.S* this »Ht now 

rmluthniie H Bit computing 

toNmthrth! 



trJJS 


m 


lJL*f 






'wM 




/&•■*&& 



t 



ONLY 
£49.95 



-*=»* 





\m=. 



Hi 



& 



m% 




wAiYifAff it THE ULTIMATE PERSONAL COPIER 



Please send me a MULTIFACE ST at £49.95 plus p&p — UK £1.00, Europe £2.00, Overseas £3.00 

I understand my order will only be processed when the MULTIFACE ST becomes availab le on the 1st November 1988. I will allow up to 28 days for delivery thereafter. 

lencloseacheque/PO/cashforC or debit my K^I^S^ No 

Name & address: 



I l l l l l I I I I i i i i i 



Cardexp. 



17 EVERSLEY ROAD, BEXHILL, E. SUSSEX (0424) 221931 



SPECIALIST COMPUTER DEALERS FOR ST & AMIGA 



Amiga A-500 + Modulator + 3 Games + Dpaint . 

Amiga + 1 084 Monitor + 3 Games + Dpaint 

Cumana 1 Meg Drive 

Philips 8833 Monitor + Cable 

Star LC-10 Printer + Cable 

Star LC-10 Colour + Cable 



....£399.00 
....£639.00 

£99.00 

....£274.95 
....£199.95 
....£234.95 



L 



AMIGA SOFTWARE 



Aaargh 

Army Moves 

Bards Tale 

Bards Tale II 

Bermuda Project 

Better Dead than Alien 

Bionic Commando 

Blitzkrieg at the Ardennes , 

Bomb Jack 

Bubble Bobble 

Bubble Ghost 

Buggy Boy 

Capone 

Carrier Command 

ChessMaster 2000 

Chrono Quest 

Corruption 

Empire 

Empire Strikes Back 

Enlightenment (Druid II) .... 

Faen/tale Adventure 

Ferrari Formual 1 

Fire And Forget 

Firepower 

Flight Simulator II 

Flight II Europe Scenery .... 

Flight M Japan Scenery 

Football Manager 2 

Footman 

Foundations Waste 

Fusion 

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Interceptor (F/A-18) 17.50 

Jet 29.95 



Star Wars 15.95 



Jinks . 

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King of Chicago 

Lancelot 

Leaderboard Birdie 

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.19.50 
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Major Motion 

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Off shore Warrior 

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Pool 

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Sentinel 

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13.50 

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Strip Poker Data Disc 1 


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World Tour Golf 


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Xenon 


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Zoom 


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Zynaps 


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UTILITIES 1 BUSINESS 


Aegis Animator & Images ... 


...99.95 


Aegis Impact 


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Aegis Sonix 


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Aegis Video Tiller 


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Deluxe Music Construction 


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Deluxe Photolab 


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Deluxe Pamt II (Pal) 


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Deluxe Print 


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Deluxe Video 


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Devpac 


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Fantavision 


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Home Accounts 


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Lattice C 


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MCC Macro Assembler 


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Photon Paint 


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Pro Sound Designer 


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Superbase Personal 


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Toolkit (Metacomco) 


29.95 


Works 


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Atari 520 Summer Pack £369.00 

Summer Pack + Philips Monitor £639.00 

Cumana 1 Meg Drive £99.95 

Philips 8833 Monitor + Cable £274.95 

Star LC-10 Printer-.- Cable £199.95 

Star LC-10 Colour* Cable £234.95 



11 



ATARI SOFTWARE 



Alien Syndrome 

Arcade Force Four 

Arkanoid 2 (Revenge of Doh) . 

Army Moves 

Around the World 

Bards Tale I 

Bionic Commando 

Bomb Jack 

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Captain Blood 

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Chessmaster 2000 

Chrono Ouest 

Corruption 

Defender of the Crown 

Dungeon Master 

Empire 

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Flight Simulator II 

Flight II Europe Scenery 

Flight II Japan Scenery 

Fotball Director II 

Football Manager 2 

Garfield 

Gary Linekers Super Skills .... 

Guantlet II .'.... 

Gold Runner II 

Gold Runner Scenery Disk .... 

Gunship 

Hyperbowl 

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Impossible Mission II 

International Soccer 

Jinxter 



12.95 


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.131.50 


19.50 


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.15.50 


13.95 


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.12.95 


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Leatherneck 4 Player Adaptor . 4.95 


13.50 


Legend of the Sword 


.15.95 


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Master of the Universe 


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Mickey Mouse 


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. .995 


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Night Raider 

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Oids 


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15.95 


Out run 


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19.95 


Peter Beardsley Soccer 


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15.95 


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19.95 


Quadralien 


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15.95 


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17.50 


.12.95 


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26.95 


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Space Harrier 


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5 2.95 


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STAC (Adventure Creator) .. 


..15.95 


13.50 


.. 29.95 


13.50 


Star Glider II 


.16.50 


15.50 


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.12.95 


f2.95 


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....6.95 


15.95 


Super Hang-On 


..1350 


6.95 


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.12.95 


.9.95 


Where Time Stood Stilt 


.13.50 


15.50 


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.13.50 


12.95 


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.12.95 


15.95 


Zynaps 


.13.50 



BUSINESS I UTILITIES 

Accountant (Sage) 129.95 

Accountant Plus (Sage) 159.95 

Assembler (Metacomco) 34.95 

Back Pack 34.95 

Degas Elite 17.50 

Devpac2 36-95 

Fast Basic (Disk) 32.95 

Fast Basic (ROM) 64.95 

First Word Plus 54.95 

Fleet Street Publisher 84.95 

GFA Basic 3.0 31.95 

GFA Compiler 31.95 

GFA Companion 23.95 

GFA Draft 68.95 

Home Acccounts (Digital 16.95 

K-Data 35.95 

K-Spread2 56.50 

Lattice C (Metacomco) 68.95 

Pro Sound Designer 44.95 

Quantum Paint 13.50 

STOS 19.95 

Super Conductor 34.95 

Superbase Personal 67.95 

Timeworks Desktop Publisher 69.95 

VIP Professional 174.95 

Word Processor (ST Soft) 7.95 

BOOKS 

Atari ST Internals 14.95 

Basic to C 13.00 

Disk Drives In and Out 1 4.95 

Gem Programmers Ref. Guide 14.95 

Intro to Midi Programming 14.95 

Logo Reference Guide 14.95 

Peeks and Pokes 11.95 

Tricks and Tips 14.95 



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DTP 
UPDATE 



Since our mega-survey of ST and Amiga desktop publish- 
ing software in issue 2, there have been a couple of new 
developments. Ben Taylor examines Shakespeare 1.1 for 
the Amiga, and Simon Williams checks out the new ver- 
sion on Timeworks DTP on the ST. 



TheE 



I 



j 



AMIGA 



SHAKESPEARE 1.1 

£148.35 ■ Amiga only, all models ■ 

Cloudhall Ltd, Bensead House, 40 Hazelwood Road, 

Northampton NN1 1LN (0604 231211) 



Shakespeare is a relatively new Amiga 
DTP package, which missed out on 
our grand survey in issue two. The 
newly released version 1.1 seems 
much more robust than the original 
1.0, and certainly merits a close look. 
Proudly labelling itself 'Shakespeare - 
The Page Integrator', the program 
claims to be particularly strong in the 
area of colour DTP. And after all, 
colour is the Amiga's strength - 
what's the point of being able to paint 
multicoloured pictures on art pack- 
ages when you can only print them 
out in black and white on a DTP page? 
Shakespeare will run on an unex- 
panded A500, which is a pleasant sur- 
prise (many of the higher-powered 
Amiga packages disdain users with 
51 2K), although the manufacturers 
recommend 1MB for serious use. The 
package comprises two disks, one 
being the program disk and the other 
having a varied selection of tutorials 
and Clip Art covering computers, road 
signs (!) and holidays. 

Flowing prose 

There's a curious mix of the conven- 
tional and the unconventional through- 
out the package: as you expect, 
before you can place any items on a 
page you first have to define your 
page size, and then create some 
empty 'boxes' to put the text or graph- 
ics in. There is no distinction between 
the two types - you've only got one 
frame-creator tool, and either text or 
graphics can go into them, although 
the two can't be mixed. 

You have to 'preload' all the text 
and graphics files before you place 
them in boxes. On a menu curiously 
named 'Chart', you click on all the text 
and graphic filenames, load them into 



memory, and them place them one at 
a time into their boxes. At least this 
way you know when you are going to 
run out of memory for your page 
before you start to lay it all out. 

Text flows into the boxes quite 
rapidly, and you can set your font 
before or after. You are restricted to 
the font sizes supplied on the disk, 
which range from 8 point to 38 point 
in various typestyles. There are 72 
points to the inch, by the way, so 38 
points is about half an inch high. This 
isn't very large for a headline, so 
you'd have to import larger sizes as 
graphics. 



One annoying feature is that 
imported text loses all its bold and 
other emphasis commands, no matter 
what word processor it was prepared 
with. You can use the editing facilities 
with Shakespeare to re-italicise what- 
ever you want, and you can mix any 
number of different styles, fonts and 
sizes in a text box. Text can be edited 
directly on-screen within a box, unlike 
Page Setter and City Desk where you 
have to go into a separate text editor. 

Graphics 

To import graphics, they should have 
been saved as a 'brush' from an art 
package. This format allows you to 
resize and crop the graphic after 
importing it. There is no graphics edi- 
tor within Shakespeare for knocking 
up quick graphs, nor any graphic- 
drawing tools at all. You can't draw 
circles; a rectangle has to be an 
empty text box with a border; a line 



POSTSCRIPT 
POSTSCRIPT 



files to 

iard Poi 



print fil 
tScript p 
iPostScr 

DTPbu iau| 
>u. However. 



[J 

ntei 
iaus 



rster afid it 
fonts to 
printing eg, 
Courie 



good so 



fontlj 

Jtion, 



■ An overview of the full page - you 
can't edit the page on this window 



Toolbox: 




edit text & resize box 

insert text box between 
two existing ones 

bring to front 
move to new page 



■ You can overlay one 
picture with another, even 
if they have different 
colour palettes. 



Wj 



I Shakespeare's editing screen 



I This column rule is actually a very long thin box 1 . 




J 




i 



features 



performance 



^ 



ease of use 



I 



SBKI 


Kl 


E 






manuals 


JM ' K^Kl 


n 


E 





format 
value 



exclusive. 



SHAKESPEARE WAS 
AN ARMftDILLO 



New evidence discovered by 
researchers at the Bodle'an 
L ibrary . Oxford, has 1 ed to tlip 
astonishing cone his ion that the 
(fell known 17th Century 

sonneteer and draiutist II. 
Shakespeare was nothing ttore 
than a housetrained ant eater. 

Professor 2. 

fire-Extinguisher, a leading 
authority on Elizabethan fauna, 
announced his results at an 
extraordinary press conference 
in London yesterday. To the open | 
scepticisn of other experts, he 
revealed to The Bath Bwnfller 
that: 

* There are no less thin 
fifteen references to sticky 
buns in Hanlet alone ' 

* The nain action for The , 
Teiipest takes place in a teniite 1 
nest 

X The iwrkins ti tie for 
Roneo and Juliet wis in fact The 
Threy Anteiler^. of Verona 

* The jokes in the 
so-called 'coiwdies' aren' t very 
funny at 



in an aot-h. 11 , and 
pi-obabi litv was a 
[•elation o*' the Aardvark 
However, not all 
i#iee 'Mth 

Fue-Extinfiuishei'. 



At 



i-ti»«>c«£suas far o'vonJ "Tte 
cloistered proves or ac-vleni?. 

Last nirfit, .it 2.35 ar, 
fleets of wans utre seen ImmJitjjt 
for Stntford, believed tc- he 
carving StVCPal hundredweight >i 
Aardvark cost-it** to the Royal 
Shakespeare CtwanjrS 

headquarters. 

RUBBISH 
A spoke?»ar for the Brins> 
Psychiatric Institute saiil today: 
"Professor Tire-Extinguisher is I 
complete loony. 

"Only last y?ar ht claiiet 
that Qi'een Elizabeth fas a bunc* 
of hollyhocks, the Pay? 'jas 1 
Parker-Knell rozlinvr and Arthic 
Scarsill a nice person. 

"He jvuht to be taken a*ja; 



«.tS i n;i'i riil i irvli;iiiii:i:i i 
-*l j v i:i i i in mi iiiiiiiihii. 




not 
for 



in the _ 

for Anthony and Cleopatra 

INESCflPABLC 
The facts, says 

Fire-Extinguisher, lend 
inescapable conclusion that the 
author has a propensity to 
snuff I injr around with his nose 



Prof . 



Bard's 



* Above - the chest mhere the Hjnacripts we stored, with 
Shitketpejire inse*. Be lev - J ?cene fvon Mjcbeth, 

British Huseun Library, 
Donald Yellowpaffes has 
examninjr other of 
nanuscripts. 

This r ire-Extinguisher 
chapp i e l s a con? Me bounder . " 
he told The Funjler. "He 
wouldn't know a I ine of I antic 
pentameter if it junp*d up and 
\iit hin in the tiekly bits. It's 
patently obvious to anybody uitli 



CI 



■ A final page printout, done on a 9-pin Epson black and white printer. You 
need to choose your picture's colours carefully - here the picture of 
Shakespeare that you can see in the screen shot has printed out white-on- 
white - hence the blank gap in the main picture! 

There is no concept of a l tab' or fixed paragraph indent in Shakespeare. 
When you justify text in a column, as on this page, each space is adjusted to 
pad the line out, so it is very hard to get regular size indents at paragraph 
starts. 



has to be a one pixel wide text box 
with a border. 

Text won't autoflow text around 
graphics. You need to carefully con- 
struct your text boxes so they don't 
interfere with the graphic items on 
the page. This is a bit naff for a high- 
priced DTP system. 

One of Shakespeare's strong 
points is its handling of colour graph- 
ics. The screen can only display four 
colours at a time, but the graphic 
information is in fact stored to 32 
colours. Furthermore, if two or more 
graphics were created with different 
palettes, eg. 64 different colours in 
total, they can still be printed out with 
their correct colours even though the 
screen display will look a bit strange 
(the screen palette changes accord- 



for 

Runs on unexpanded ASOO 
Can include colour graph- 
ics with different palettes 
in same page 
I Can edit text directly on 
page 



against 



Needs to be closely tied in 

to a specific printer 

Loses styles of imported 

text 

No zoom commands 

No auto reflow 

No graphics editor 




ing to which graphic is currently 
active). 

Shakespeare is poor on zooming 
to work on the page at different 
sizes. You've basically got no choice; 
work at full size (as in the sample 
screen dump shown in this review) 
when you can't see the whole width of 
the page at once, or inspect with a 
full-page overview, a miniscule size at 
which you can't edit. 

Driven dotty 

Printer insallation is one aspect of 
Shakespeare which makes it extreme- 
ly cumbersome to set up. You have to 
know how many dots per inch your 
printer supports, and the screen is 
then set up to match. On a 9 pin 
printer, which may be 120 by 72 dots 
per inch, the page takes up less 
space on screen than a 24 pin printer 
which works at up to 180 by 180 
dots. Because the page aspect ratio 



UP AGAINST 
THE REST 

So how does Shakespeare com- 
pare with the other Amiga DTP$, 
Page Setter, City Desk and 
Professional Page? 

In many respects 

Shakespeare falls between two 
stools. It is too expensive to oust 
City Desk as the home user's 
favourite, and it doesn't compete 
with Professional Page as a power 
user's workhorse. 

On the plus side, 
Shakespeare has excellent han- 
dling of colour graphics. Owners 
of colour printers will really appre- 
ciate being able to print out any 
number of colours on a page 
regardless of the fact that only 
four can be displayed on screen 
at once. 

Text handling is adequate, but 
not being able to automatically 
flow text around graphics boxes is 
a bit of a blow. The dot matrix 
printout is a good representation 
of what's on the screen, the fonts 
come out well (compared to 
Professional Page, where if you 
don't have a PostScript-compati- 
ble laser printer the output is very 
poor.) 

Overall, once you've taken the 
trouble to set Shakespeare up for 
your printer the quality of text out- 
put can be quite good. Because 
all text style are lost when text is 
imported, it isn't suitable for long 
text documents; as a 1-page 
colour poster preparer, 

Shakespeare is fun to use, but as 
a fully fledged DTP system it fails 
to impress. 



is customised for your printer, you've 
got to set your Printer Preferences up 
just right, and if you have two printers 
(maybe one for drafts and one for 
final copies) you can't print the same 
document out to both if they have dif- 
ferent pin densities. 

The advantage of this system is 
that the correspondence between 
screen display and printed output is 
very good when you set it up proper- 
ly. Graphics can be resized very well, 
and still print out without jaggies. 
Printout is quite fast, mainly due to 
the Workbench 1.3 printer drivers 
supplied with the kit. 



SHAKESPEARE UPDATES 

If you have a copy of Shakespeare 1.0, the early version, you'll want to know 
what's changed. Apart from fixing a few bugs and making the program more 
robust, the main additions are: 

■ The Amiga's SetMap command is now properly recognised, so you 
can get the UK character set on screen. 

m When you import text from an ASCII file, which usually has a hard 
return at the end of each line, Shakespeare 'intelligently strips' the returns 
out to give you a continuous paragraph. 

■ Alignment guides are shown on screen as you move boxes around. 
These are extensions the edges of the box right across the screen, so you 
can line it up with other on-screen hems. 

■ You can now divide a page into equal columns for text (with rules 
inbetween) with a single command, rather than drawing each column manu- 
ally. 

■ You can scroll the page by dragging it with the 'move' tool 



TIMEWORKS DTP 

£99.95 ■ ST only, all mod- 
els ■ Electric/GST, 8 Green 
Street, Willingham, 
Cambridge CB4 5JA (0954 
61258) 

Timeworks DTP was designed to be 
an inexpensive Desktop Publishing 
program to rival more costly offerings 
like Ventura Publisher on the PC. It 
was reviewed in Issue 2 of Format, 
but since then has undergone some 
improvements to raise its version 
number from 1.05 to 1.12. The price 
remains a very modest (for a DTP) 
£99. 

The improvements range from 
more accurate line-art resizing, to the 
ability to print a PostScript file to disk. 
This last feature is not everything you 
might expect, though, as you can only 
print to disk if your ST is equipped 
with a hard disk. This might be rea- 
sonable on the lower memory 520 
and 1040 STs, but there seems little 
reason why the file conversion 
couldn't be adequately handled in 
memory on the Megas. The main 
advantage of printing to disk is that 
you can produce top quality DTP 
pages without the necessity of expen- 
sive hardware such as PostScript 
laser printers... and hard disks! 

Extra file 
compatibility 

The problems experienced with lead- 
ing of text in the earlier version seem 
to have been sorted out, and you can 
now specify a leading smaller than 
the point size of the text. Most of the 
other additions to the program are to 
increase the level of compatibility 
between the DTP and text and graph- 
ic programs. Word Perfect has been 




TIMEWORKS DTP VI .2 

This sample page shows several of the new 
features of the upgraded version of the Time- 
works DTP software. The images are taken 
from four different ST art packages, each 
loaded from within the package, rather than 
by using a separate utility. The finished page 
has been saved to disk as a PostScript file and 
printed separately - useful for printing via a 
DTP bureau. 



. 4 This image was imported from GEM 

Paint as a IMG file. 



This image comes from 
Degas Elite and was also — ► 
loaded directly into Time- 
works DTP. 

lis image is Irom GEM draw, and is an 
>ject-oriented vector graphics image 
ported from a GEM file. 



■ A page, containing graphics from a variety of different packages, all printed 
out under PostScript. 



added to the list of supported word 
processors, so it's now possible to 
take in text in this file format. On the 
graphics side, the screen font format 
has been reconciled with that used by 
Easy Draw 2 to make import of these 
pictures easier. Both these two addi- 
tions seemed to be geared towards 
the American market - since there 
are more STs in the UK than there are 
in the USA, it might have been better 



ALREADY THERE 

The original product already has many of the features you should expect 
from a serious Desktop Publisher, ft uses GEM to provide a WYSIWYG display 
of a portion of your finished page, but can also show reduced size displays to 
give an impression of the the layout of the entire page, or a DPS. Text can be 
imported from a number of leading ST word processors, maintaining format- 
ting commands and some text effects, like bold text and underlining. 
Similarly, graphics can be imported from most of the popular drawing pack- 
ages, including Degas Elite and Neochrome, Timeworks can work in 
monochrome or four colour medium resolution displays, and the low-res 
graphics of Neochrome are automatically converted on import 

The main advantage of Timeworks over most of its rivals is its ability to 
handle multi-page documents with ease, ft does this through a system of 
'stylesheets' which let you define a particular set of font characteristics and 
assign them a name for a particular part of your text (like 'headline', 'caption' 
or 'body copy'). You can then tag text within a document with a given style, 
and it will take on the complete set of attributes in one go. 

The program is designed to print on any printer from a 9 pin dot matrix, 
through 24 pinners, the Atari and HP lasers up to a PostScript laser which 
can cost five times as much as an ST4. You can only install a single printer 
driver at any one time, which means you can't run a draft dot matrix as well 
as a final copy laser. 

The manual runs to 120 pages, but has no index, and the original pro- 
gram came on four disks which require a fairly long-winded, but easy to fol- 
low installation routine. 



for GST to work with Arnor on 
Protext compatibility, for instance. 

The other interesting addition to 
Timeworks DTP is the ability to print 
in landscape mode. This means print- 
ing along the length of the paper 
rather than across its width and is 
particularly useful if you want to print 
a Double Page Spread (DPS) which 
will eventually been folded to produce 
the finished document. Since the 
paper still moves through the printer 
in the same direction, this involves 
printing characters sideways down 
the page. 

On appeal 

The original verdict on Timeworks 
DTP was very good, with particular 
praise for its handling of long docu- 
ments. This verdict still stands, with 
the improved features adding to its 
value for money. There are still areas, 
such as printing to disk on non-hard 
disk STs, which would benefit from 
further work, but with a policy of con- 
tinuous improvement, no doubt 
Electric and GST are looking at these. 



features 


4.0 


performance 


4.0 


ease of use 


4.0 


documentation 


3.0 


format value 


4.0 




ON THE 
UPGRADE 

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Syntax 





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ei3.sc 


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E13.2C 






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SCREENPLAY 

Despite the best efforts of September's post strike, 
the games just kept on coming. Andy Storer, narrow- 
ly passed over for the Olympic modern pentathlon, 
shoots, swims, steers and schemes his way through 
the months finest before riding off into the sunset of 
New Computer Express. 

Only 14 games made it to the post-box in September 
and no prizes for guessing why that should be. 
Thanks, Royal Mail. 

After the lost limos, liquid lunches, and disco din- 
ners that we journalists refer to as The PC Show', 
even more copy got delayed. To make amends, and 
generally SOBER UP, we decided to come out fight- 
ing for this one, and so there's 10 reviews awaiting 
you. 

Only one FORMAT GOLD qualifier this issue 
though; MENACE has hardly been off our screens 
since it arrived in the office. As our friends on ACE 
are only too quick to point out - Psygnosis should 
bring it out as a coin-op. There's NO REAL DIFFER- 
ENCE. It'd clean up faster than you can say 
SEGATAITOKONAMICAPCOMJALECOSNK. 

ELITE would have easily qualified too if we didn't 
believe there's NO LIFEFORM IN THE ENTIRE UNI- 
VERSE that doesn't already know it inside out. Maybe 
this isn't true for all of you - in which case we ask, 
"What planet are you from, Matey?" Seriously though, it's great to see it updated and we wait with baited breath 
for the transputer versions. 

FUSION might replace adventure with puzzle-sotving but you'd be hard 
pressed to find any game with more STYLISH ARTWORK. We're talking SERI- 
OUS DEFINITION here with coloured abstract backgrounds that should be 
screen-dumped to the Tate forthwith. 

The RELIEF MAPPING in STARGOOSE is pretty groovy too. There's no way 

Logotron's FULL BEEF 

SCROLLER could be called 
HAMMY but there again we prefer 
our beef a little more overdone. 
Nevertheless, it's definitely worth a 
gander if only to catch a glimpse 
of the TRULY PSYCHEDELIC tun- 
nel sequences. 

There's plenty of beef but 
less fine art to be found in P.O.W., 
save for the ART OF WAR of 
course - and some funky monkeys 
wearing sunglasses, but then the 
only colour that matters in this 
POST-VIETNAM CARNAGE EPIC 
is red. If only U.S. Action had sent us the LIGHT PHASER GUN that goes with it 
we could have all signed up for RAMBO IV. 

Which isn't exactly a million miles away from VETERAN- a Yugoslavian import featuring sampled battlefield 
sounds so EXCRUCIATINGLY REAL our Art department have taken to wearing Combat Fatigues whenever we 





GAMES INDEX 






FORMAT GOLD 




Menace 


Psygnosis 

REVIEWED 


48 


Fusion 


Electronic Arts 


52 


P.O.W. 


U.S. Action 


53 


Powerplay 
Luxor 


Arcan 

Software Horizons 


58 
58 


Stargoose 
Elite 


Logotron 

Firebird 


59 

60 


Veteran 


Software Horizons 


62 


Operation Neptune 

Infogrames 


62 


Super Hang-On Mediagenic 
Netherworld Hewson 


64 
64 



^ 


h 


REVIEW 






boot it. Ifs the grenades they carry we object to. 

On rainy days we swap our boots for flip- 
pers and engage in a spot of SUB-AQUATIC 
COMBAT in OPERATION NEPTUNE. All the 
graphics may take place under the surface but 
then it's riding the FRENCH NEW WAVE along 
with all the other Infogrames releases. Let's not 
forget Loriciels while we're at it. 

Finally, we throttled back on SUPER HANG- 
ON and wheelied our way around the world. 
Wed just cleared the JUNGLES OF NORTH 
AMERICA in record time when we hit a warp 
and found ourselves in NETHERWORLD; a curi- 
ous place if there ever was one. This dimension 
can get pretty strange but Netherworld makes 
even the Format office look normal. And that's 
saying something - how many offices do you 
know that have posters of NAKED ARMADIL- 
LOS on the walls? 



rECHJ 



it is with deep regret that we announce the 
passing of Andy Storer, games reviewer 
extraordinaire. "Die, alien filth," was his jolly 
catchphrase at the console. 

Andy's off to PUNCH DECK for our new 
baby sister magazine, the weekly NEW COM- 
PUTER EXPRESS. Out mid-November, 48p 
every week, the FIRST news, the FIRST 
reviews. (That's enough free advertising - 
Ed). Catch his achingly witty games reviews 
there. 

In the meantime, Mark Higham joins the 
Format team as the new games supremo. 
Can our reviews get EVEN BETTER? - Of 
course they can! Watch this space... 



Since completing the review of Operation 
Neptune it has come to our attention that 
the version reviewed is a development copy 
not intended for assessment, and is likely to 
show significant improvements when the 
final production version is released. 

As with any monthly magazine, we 
strive to be the first to bring new products to 
the attention of our readers. To be fair to 
Infogrames, though we will update our 
review to reflect the final features of the 
game as soon as we receive a production 
copy. This will still be before the product is 
finally launched. 



FORMAT ■ 47 



REVIEW 



MENACE 






GOLD 



PSYGNOSIS 



Amiga - £24.95, Mouse or Joystick 



ST - £24.95. Due October. 



The first release from 
Psygnosis's new label 
Psyclapse is a scrolling 
shoot 'em up which betrays 
the unmistakable influence 
of popular arcade games 
like Nemesis and 

Salamander. Menace, orig- 
inally known as Draconia 
but since renamed, pro- 
vides some of the best 
arcade action yet seen on 
the Amiga. Past releases of 
this genre have been lack- 
ing in gameplay but 
Menace points the way to a 
rosier future for Amiga 
gameplayers with its 
arcade quality graphics 
sound and above all, 
exceptional gameplay. 




A You've just destroyed a wave of aliens and its time to reap the rewards. 



Shoot 
the icon to 
collect 
extra 
weaponry 
and ammu- 
nition. 

m Shield 
Strength, If 
ft hits zero 
its all over, 

Number 
of shots left 
from your 
cannons, 
currently 
healthy. 

Lasers 

are at full 

capacity 

and ready 

to let rip. 




i A huge Space Slug is your transportation to Draconia. Cute little fellow isn't he! 



AIM 

Far into the future, six feared 
tyrants have come together to 
reek vengenee on the 
Universe. Using matter col- 
lected from other planets they 
have destroyed, the planet 
Draconia has been 'restyied'. 
All the other inhabitants of the 
Universe are less than keen 
about this. Something has to 
be done to save the people of 
the Universe and after much 
deliberation, guess who has 
to go in alone in a single seat 
fighter, against impossible 
odds and destroy Draconia 
before it is too late. Oh, you 
are clever... 



The gameplay is fairly straightforward, using 
either a mouse or a joystick to guide a small 
fighter through six levels of increasingly diffi- 
cult zapping. As usual your presence doesn't 
go unnoticed, and the inhabitants of Draconia 
throw everything they have at you in one fren- 
zied attack after another. 

Each of the six levels moves the battle 
into a different area of Draconia, from the 
exotic landscapes of the Sea of Karnaugh 
and the beauty of the tropics of Mace, to 
Carnage Rift, which looks more like a scene 
from The Evil Dead than a planet's surface. 



STRATEGY 

Menace features over sixty different 
types of alien, all of which are hell-bent on 
your destruction. Most can be dispensed with 
fairly easily with a few quick blasts from your 
ship's lasers but others are more stubborn. 
To increase your chances, extra weapons can 
be collected and recharged en route, by 
shooting the bonus score icons at the end of 
each stage. Weapons include high power 
lasers, rapid fire cannons and inertia-con- 
trolled outriders. Add both lasers and can- 
nons to your ship and alien-wasting moves 
into top gear. 



End of level guardians are the last chal- 
lenge on each level and fire multiple salvos in 
your direction. A mixture of dexterous flying, 
frantic mouse bashing and a lot of luck 
should get you past the guardian and onto 
the next level. Tooling up for these meanies is 
the name of the game in Menace, though, as 
going up against a guardian with a singie 
puny laser is bad news. Before you reach the 
end of a levei, arm yourself to the teeth with 
cannons, outriders and lasers, and recharge 
your shields to the maximum level. 



48 ■ FORMAT 



3» 



REVIEW 




▲ Wasting this alien shouldn't be much of a 
problem.... 



Oil What's going on here then?.. 



▲ Arms spinning rapidly, these aliens are no 
push over. 




▲ Carnage Rift - a pleasant place to spend your holiday. 



▲ Cannons and Lasers are both 
out as you come up against 
more opposition 



GRAPHICS AND SOUND 



As you would expect from Fsygnosis r Menace 
scores highly in the graphics department. The 
background and foreground graphics in all six lev- 
els are some of the best seen on the Amiga, with 
the decapitated bodies, rotting flesh and maggot 
ridden skulls of Carnage Rift being beautifully stom- 
ach churning. 

The graphics and animation of both your ship 
and all the Draconian aliens are all up to the same 
high standard, making Menace one of the best pre- 
sented games available. Even the introduction is 
impressive as a huge space slug moves smoothly 
across the screen filling almost the entire play area; 
a truly impressive demonstration of the Amiga's 



graphic capabilities. Scrolling too is exceptionally 
smooth, with not a glitch in sight. 

The soundtrack is equally brilliant, with a heavy 
rock sound track reminiscent of both Xenon and 
Sidewinder. It's nice to find a game soundtrack that 
suits the mood of the game, something which 
game designers too often overlook. Playing a jolly 
little ditty while wiping out a race of aliens doesn't 
conjure up the right atmosphere. The overall feel of 
the game is enhanced still further with some excel- 
lent sampled speech and sound effects. Feed the 
sound output into a hi-fi system, turn the volume up 
and the lights down and the atmosphere is electric. 




▲ An end of level confrontation; 
ifs you or him... 




▲ The confrontation ends as 
explosions rip through the 
guardian's superstructure 



CONCLUSION 

Menace will have you hooked 
for hours on end. The addic- 
tive 'just one more game' feel- 
ing hits you every tim e The 
mixture of arcade quality 
graphics, sound and game- 
play make this one hot shoot 
'em up. While Menace does 
nothing to promote intergalac- 
tic peace, the shear satisfac- 
tion of wasting aliens this ugly 
is just too good to miss. In all, 
a recommended dose of pure 
arcade violence - just what the 
doctor orderd 

Jason Holborn 



still graphics 




fi^H ^^^^^K^H ■ |F1 








moving graphics 




pKKUKHJ 








soundtrack 




EZ^fl ^EIHE^I iB-l 








lasting interest 




LflKSXSj 








overall 90% 



FORMAT ■ 49 



JiX- 




mountainous plateau 
somewhere in deepest 
Tibet. You and your 
companions are alive. 
A large shape moves towarc 
you, you rub your eyes in 
disbelief; a Dinosaur! - 
where are you ...andwhen7 
'""' jnning, monochromatic 
3U graphics and 4 way 
scrolling, give that '50's 
cinema mood as you learn 
not only to survive, but also 
that your companions are 
not all they first seemed! 



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One phrase sums up the 
success and appeal of 
Arkanoid - "I'll just have 
another go! " Arkanoid is 
addictive! Using all the 
capabilities of the 16 bit 
micro this conversion is 
almost an exact replica w 
all the excitement of the 
original Taito coin-op srric 
hit. This is Arkanoid -the 
blockbuster. 



33SJIB 




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tjti< 

I The first casualty o\ 




game design and digitised sound 
all add up to recreate the 
atmosphere generated in the box 
office smash hit. Closely following 
the original storyline you take 
your platoon, selecting individual 
men for assignment, who will 
encounter the enemy and their 
many booby traps as you seek to 
find the enemy's underground 
headquarters. On entering the 
warren of tunnels you will need 
flares and a keen eye -your 
enemy will lunge at you, from 
beneath the waters which flood 
the tunnel floor, wielding vicious 
knives - the atmosphere itself is 
enough to kill! 



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DALEY IS BACK Enter the 1988 Olympic Challenge with 
Daley Thompson as you 'work out' in the gym, where your 
efforts will directly affect your performance in the 
competition itself - another first from Ocean. 

Ten Olympic events include Long Jump, Shotput, High 
Jump, 100m Sprint, 400m, 110m Hurdles, Discus, Pole 
Vault, Javelin and 1500m. You will need all your skills to 
build on what you hope was, an impressive work-out, and, 
as is necessary for all top flight athletes, your judgement to 
select the most effective equipment for each event is now 
vital - a decision which can win or lose you a place on the 
podium. 

This isn't just another sports simulation, this is a Daley 
Thompson 'event' where all his talent and humour burst 
through to make a thrilling and enter taining game play for 
all the family. Go for the Olympic Challenge! 



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REVIEW 




BULLFROG PRODUCTIONS/ELECTRONIC ARTS 



Amiga - £24.95. Joystick only. 



Although Powerdrome 
was supposed to pre- 
cede it, recent delays have 
meant that Fusion surfaces 
as E.A.'s first release devel- 
oped entirely by U.K. 
artists. And the team that 
brought you Enlighten- 



ment - Druid \\ have 
brought with them much of 
the look of that game. 
However there's not a magi- 
cian in sight here - we're 
talking serious annihilation 
as you try and construct 
and then detonate a bomb. 



! Switches collected 

I Bomb parts collected 
m Decoder 



Your mother-ship Your score 

I Force-field energy available 
■ Shield energy remaining 



I " I I, ^j, v ^. ^ g| [^tfrfrf jO<>< 



Y~Y*yy~ t yy-y>>> 




I Bomb every base to find the basis of the bomb 



GRAPHICS AND SOUND 



Despite an action window only a 
little over half the height of the 
screen, and uneven parallax 
scrolling, Fusion's graphics are 
nevertheless finely crafted and 
feature probably the best con- 
toured landscapes you'll see. 
Each level is a mix of elevations 
and plains through which you 
can glimpse slower scrolling 
pools of latticed colour threads. 
Throw in the sleekly animated 



enemy sprites and you have a 
rich variety of terrains com- 
posed with great care and atten- 
tion to detail. Full eight way 
movement completes a very 
pretty picture. 

Sound is confined to an 
ever-present background score, 
which tends to detract from the 
graphics at hand, and the usual 
kind of spot effects of lasers 
and explosions. 




ST - Due early 1989. 



►iJ2-€^5a±:N"e£> 









I Some of the fabulous scenery you may encounter 



GAMEPLAY 

You begin Fusion in an Assault Crawler, a slow moving ground vehicle 
which you direct along the causeways of a richly textured landscape 
on a search for your mother-ship, which is concealed by a cloaking 
.device. This brings you face to face with the five types of enemy hiding 
beneath silos and bunkers; blue rotating plasmo spheres, grey cruise 
missiles, orange-eyed nitro mice, purple ergonomic disrupters and 
blue-edged hovering saucers emerge to work in unison against you. 

Once you're in its immediate vicinity your mother-ship materialises 
and you're able to board it. The aim is locate the nine disparate parts 
of a bomb distributed among the thirteen alien levels, collect and 
return them to the first level for construction. 

Finding the parts is one thing - actually collecting them is quite 
another. There are a number of different coloured switches which when 
activated allow access to grid areas and other levels otherwise pro- 
tected by force-fields and spheroids. To collect a key you must land 
your ship near it on a piece of open flat ground - a feature hard to find 
near anything useful - and leave the ship in your crawler to pick the 
key up. To make matters worse, some keys are located in areas pro- 
tected by other switches so the puzzle element of the game involves 
determining the correct sequence of switches to activate. 

To help you out in the face of prolonged physical assault are spe- 
cial feature icons which will provide you with bonuses such as extra 
shield energy, increased firepower and defensive force-field. There are 
also 'Save Game' icons to be found, usually next to inter-level exits 
where you may resume a game at a future date. 



■ You find your way to another 
level requires the key to this 
switch 



CONCLUSION 

Insidiously addictive, Fusion 
delivers a finely weighted mix 
of arcade and strategy ele- 
ments combining to present a 
series of logical puzzles. Add 
this to the great' graphics on 
show and you have a game 
deserving to be bought. Lefs 
hope it doesn't bomb. 




52 ■ FORMAT 



REWIEW 




ACTIONWARE/US ACTION 



Amiga - £29.95, Mouse, Optional Light Gun 



ST - £29.95, version imminent 



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tJPJvery red blooded 
C American is sick- 
ened by our enemy's injus- 
tice toward our men who 
gave their lives for their 
country. Many of our boys 
are still over there and 
you're going in to get them 
out". Three guesses where 
POW was originally devel- 
oped? You got it. 
Thankfully, hiding under 
the propaganda is one of 
the best Operation Wolf- 
type games yet to appear 
on either the Amiga or ST. 

This is the first of a set 
of Actionware games which 
lets you use a special light 
gun instead of the mouse, 
for added venom in 
combat. 




■ 20 miles? Through this jungle? 
Count me out, Sarge - breaking 
through the enemy lines you've 
got a few problems. 



HISTORY 
CORNER 

Officially, the last American 
combat soldiers pulled out of 
Vietnam in 1975 when the 
capital, Saigon, finally fell to 
the overwhelming Communist 
forces. 

Contrary to the official 
view, many Americans still 
believe that some soldiers 
are being held captive in 
Vietnam. This sets the scene 
for POW, and of course 
Rambo, where Sylvester 
Stallone proved that you don't 
need to be able to act to 
make a lot of money. 



GAMEPLAY 

You, the hero, are part of a parachute team landing in the darkest jun- 
gle, from where you set about waging war upon the entire army of 
Vietnam all for peace, justice and the American way. 

Each mission takes you through a variety of different backdrops 
ranging from the jungle to the enemy encampment, to rescue your 
compatriots, and finally onto the beach to make your escape. It isn't 
going to be easy, as Charlie throws everything at you in an attempt 
to bring about your rapid demise. As soldiers pop in from the side of 
the screen, you have to get them in the mouse-controlled crosshairs 
for rapid despatch. 

First Aid kits and spare ammo cases fall to the ground at various 
times - shoot them to collect their benefit. If you run out of bullets, 
it's mission over. 

For an extra £49.95, a light gun is available for use with POW. 
This replaces the mouse and would definitely add to the realism - 
unfortunately we didn't get one with the review copy, so can't say 
how reliable it is. 




■ In the village and not a single peasant to victimise. Rambo eat your 
heart out 



GRAPHICS AND SOUND 

It's not only in the gameplay that the similarities between POW and 
Operation Wolf are apparent. In the graphics department too, the par- 
allels are unmistakable. Each backdrop is beautifully drawn and very 
detailed, with many in-jokes - watch out for the banjo-playing swamp 
beastie! 

The enemy has a definite South American look, rather than 
Vietnamese, which in the light of recent U.S. foreign policy makes 
you feel as though you're holidaying in Nicaragua. 

Animation within POW is well designed and fast - almost too fast 
as all too often you find yourself overwhelmed by an ever increasing 
number of enemy soldiers and tanks. 

POW has a rather dull music score that does no justice whatso- 
ever to the rest of the game's sound. The rattle of enemy machine 
guns and the last screams of a dying soldier are all high quality digi- 
tised spot effects. 



■ You've still a long way to go 
before you reach the beaches 
and eventual safety. 




■ Talk about sitting targets... ifs 
a good thing you're there to 
cover your misguided comrade 
as he climbs slowly up the 
communications tower. 




■ They don't give up easy, these 
gooks. Enemy fire continues 
frantically to the very end. 



CONCLUSION 

Several Operation Wolf clones 
already exist, but none as well 
put together and as playable 
as POW. It looks like Ocean 
are going to have to produce 
something very special indeed 
with the official coirvop con- 
version if they are to put POW 
in the shade. 



still graphics 




E^l ^El^^^E^I ^EJ 






moving graphics 




LlH ^Kj^^HlH ^LJ 






soundtrack 




EZfl ^E^^^EH KiJ 






lasting interest 




EjH ^F^^^^^H ^EJ 






overall 84% 



FORMAT ■ 53 




ADBROKE 
OMPUTING 

ft M AT I O M A L 



33 Ormskirk Road, 
Preston, Lanes, PR1 2QP. I 
Tel: (0772) 21474 (I line)| 
(0772)203166(5 lines) 
Bui/Board (0772) 27236 
6.00pm lo 9.00pm 



DEALER 
ENQUIRIES 
WELCOME 



Our mail order dept gives the same excellent service to our customers as our premises at the above address has done for 

the past 8 years. All Software/Hardware has been tested prior to delivery thus ensurcing that customers receive working 

items and the frustration of returning faulty goods is now a thing of the past This kind of quality service does cost a 

little more but in the long run it is far cheaper. AH prices fully inclusive of VAT, Delivery, there are NO hidden 

cxtras-WYSIWYG. 

Prices for megas and desktop publishing packages have been omitted as the prices arc changing and we want to be able 

to offer the best price. If you are looking for a system Phone us last for the most compctctivc prices. 

For next day delivery add £3. Prices correct at time of going to press and are subject to change without prior noticc.- 

TO ORDER Send, or phone your order, stating name, address, VISA or ACCESS No's, Cheque or Money Order. 
Make payable to LADBROKE COMPUTING INTERNATIONAL. SEND SAE FOR CATOLOGUE. 



IHJSINISS SYSTIMS 



MEGA ST 4 
DTP SYSTEM 1 
DTP SYSTEM 2 



PRINTERS 



PC3 DD 



£747.49 
£480 



1040 STP's 
While stocks last 
External Modulators for 
the 1040 STP's £54.99 
SM124 Mono mon £139 
SCI 224 colour £375 
Philips 8883 colour 
monitor £299 

Tv's and others phone 
Any of above screens 
bought with a computer 
Deduct £10. 



UPGRADES 



1 Mg STFM (kit) £90 
STFM Upgrade fitting 



Star LC10 £225 

Star LC10 Colour £275 
CHi/en LP10 £199 

NEC 2200 £429 

Epson LQ500 £429 

Star LC10/24 £429 

Epson LQ800 £570 

Gachcn Daisywhcel £199 
Atari SLM804 Laser £1350 
All printers come complete 
with cables etc. 
Interfaces arc separate. 



PERIPHERALS 



Triangle IMg drive £119 

Pro Draw Tablet phone 

Image Scanner £89 

Hawk Scanner £1250 

CRP Tablets A4 £414 

A3 £818 

Supra 20mg £549 

Supra 30mg £599 

Triangle 20mg £499 

Triangle 40mg £699 



DUST COVERS 



£15 



)ur Atari trained engineers 
'will repair all hardware in 
minimum time at compcti 
live rates. 



Computers 
Monitors 
Disk Drives 
Hard Disks 
Printers 



£3.99 
£4.99 
£2.99 
£4.99 
£7.99 



SI'CONI) l)RIVI«: BARGAINS 



Wc are offering Cum ana 1 Megabyte second drives for the 

ST's at an incredible price of £104.99. 

We also have Cumana 1 Megabyte second drives for the 

Amiga at just £97-99. 

1/2 Megabyte Atari SF354 second drives for only £69.99 

while stocks last These arc Quality Drives at a bargain price 

which includes power supply unitsXCumanas have internal 



nower Kunnli 



SPECIAL OFFER SUMMER PACK 



3$ SSSMCW&MS, 



COMMADORE AMIGA SPECIAL OFFER 



(to cromllw m 



(Qsmmx&sm \KC aila® m^M l & £M$DJM) 



SPELL AND ADD WITH OSCAR 
112.99 EACH 



Spell teaches keyboard skills, spelling and motor coordina- 
tion while Add teaches addition, subtraction.multiplicatton 
and division. 



QUICK LIST PLUS , MASTERMAT , PK STRIP 

112.99 



uick list plus is a Directory Database 
Compiler. Mastcrmat is a customised format and copy 
protect programme. 

Picstrip is a full screen picture manipulator which Supports 
GFA, FAST, HISOFT TURBO and ST BASICs. Compati 
blc with DEGAS, NEOCHROME and AB ANIMATOR. 
Grab all or part of a picture in all resolutions. 
These three programs are offered on the same disk. 



AH ANIMATOR 114 99 



Animated Graphics Tool for the ST. Supports GFA 
and FAST Basics. Compatible with DEGAS 
and NEOCHROME files. Full Facilities such as Draw, 
Fill, Grid Copy etc. Includes FREE basic routines 
and demo progs. 



MAGNETIC Ml- 1)1 A 
3.5" D/S Q/l) 5.25" D/S Q/l) 96 TPI 



llHbox 

: ' ■-. ■ 

lach 



. .£14 
. .£15.50 
..£140 



£70 



llii'h Quality VIIS Video Tapes. 



. .£2.99 For 4 £ 11.40 

For 2 . .£5.80 For 10 . £26.00 

All Disks are Top Quality SONY products and arc covered 
by an unconditional lifetime guarantee 
We also stock a full range of quality P/D ST Software at 
£3.99 per Disk(discounts for Software club member: 



LADBKOKL COMPUTING SOITWARIv CLUB 



hunting for you. For an annual membership fee of just £1 
we will GUARANTEE a saving to you the member of \i 
off MRRrXmcmbcrs only)- Wc will also keep you up to < 
on new releases in the Software and Hardware worlds 
and of any special offers , up to 30% reductions , in the 




GAME 
BUSTERS 



When the heat's right on and your life looks a mess; when your face 
turns blue and you can't take the stress; where ya gonna go? 
Gamebusters! More insider dealings than the board of Guinness. 



STREET 
FIGHTER 
■ Amiga 

Tips for duffing up opponents: 
Japan - Retsu: keep kicking him in 



the ankle. 

Japan - Geki: jump high to avoid 

darts and kick him in the ankle 

when possible. 

USA - Joe: keep kicking him in 

the ankle. 




USA - Mike: kick him in the ankle 

until he crouches down to punch 

you. Jump high before he punches 

you and then kick him in the face. 

England - Birdie and Eagle: stay 

low and wait for them to 

approach. Kick them in the ankle 

to dispose of them. 

China - Lee and Gen: ankle-high 

kicks for these guys. 

Thailand - Adon: ankle job once 

again. 

Thailand - Sagat: watch out for 

fireballs and the opponent's long 

reach. Jump high, kick and 

retreat. Repeat procedures. 

Paul Ng 

Swindon, Wiltshire 




SLAP FIGHT 
■ ST 

Get onto the second section with- 
out firing a shot and you will be 
given 150,000 points. You will 
also be positioned just after the 
first brain cell and awarded two 
extra ships. You must, however, 
accomplish this with your first life. 
(No name suppplied) 



IKARI WARRIORS 
■ ST 

Tank Tactics - enter the tank as soon as possible and crash into the 
first building you come across. Press Fl and admire the "Game 
Over" message. Restart the game; tanks are invincible from now on. 
David Woods 
Cumbran, Gwent 

Pressing the space bar during the game lets your character move 
into the foliage on either side of the screen. This feature is particu- 
larly useful when you're faced with hordes of stampeding troops, The 
space bar also locks the tank barrel into a set position until the key 
is pressed again. 
R Stanley 
Stalybridge, Cheshire. 




FORMAT ■ 55 



TIPS 



WAR HAWK 

■ ST 

Press F3 once the game has load- 
ed. Then shoot the blue blob dur- 
ing the game. Infinite power is 
yours! 

Niels Gudegast 
Stockport, Cheshire 

BACKLASH 

■ ST 

To get a high score move the 
enemy ports close together and 
keep your guns blazing in the 
direction of the port holes. 
Anything that dares come out will 
be blasted. There are two ports; 
these can be bunched together by 
approaching one of them from the 
side and pushing it until both are 
side by side. 
Niels Gudegast 
Stockport, Cheshire 

TRAILBLAZER 

■ ST 

While the game loads press the 
keys [Help] i 1 2 (that's a letter 
eye-then a digit one) in that order 
and then type in cheat. During 
the game you can press [F3] to 
remove gravity, [F5] to change the 
shape of the ball, [F6] to change 
player two's ball and [Help] to hear 



the digitised laugh. 
Paul Warner 
Eltham, London 

WIZBALL 
■ Amiga 

Pause the game (space bar) and 
type RAINBOW. Resume the game 
and press the pause key again. 
Now hit [C] to fill the pot with the 
current colour. 
Mark Bowles 
Ashford, Middx 



iSt&MJjB 




PANDORA 

■ ST and Amiga 

To complete the game follow 
these instructions. Use Lt 
Commander's ID to open 
Commander's room. When in 
Commander's room pick up blue 
code, scarlet code and 



THE GREATEST GAMES WAITING 
TO BE GRABBED 

Tips, pokes and game-busting ploys. Yes, we want the lot If you've 
discovered a secret password, written a poke, mapped a game, com- 
pleted an adventure, found ways of getting high scores or know of 
any underhand method that lets you win, then send us details. Doing 
so could win you a collection of the best new games for your 
machine, ST or Amiga. 

Interested? Well stop gawping. Get your game busters to us. 
Send them to Gamebusters, ST/Amiga Format, 4 Queen Street, Bath, 
BA1 IE J. Please state whether tips are for ST or Amiga. Try and 
make tips short and snappy - we want to know how to complete the 
game, not a catalogue of all known Capybara's south of Penge. 
Pokes can be any length as they will be included on the cover disk 
rather than printed. If a poke is very long, please send it on a 3.5" 
disk. Enclose a jiffy bag and return postage if you want it back. 

We have had so much good stuff that we've had to hold a lot of it 
back. Don't worry, it will appear eventually. Keep sending in those 
crackers. 



AMIGA POKES ON DISK 

Peter Featherstone, pokester supreme on the 8-bit CPC scene, has 
directed his talents towards hacking Amiga games. And, boy, has he 
chosen a couple of goodies to demonstrate his skills. 

The two Elite titles, Ikari Warriors and Beyond the tee Palace, 
have been give a thorough thrashing. Infinite lives, ammo, grenades 
and fuel will definitely give you the edge in Ikari Warriors. While the 
infinite lives provided for Ice Palace should make the game easier to 
complete. 

Double click on the drawer labelled Gamebusters. Inside you will 
find three files: CHEAT.DOC, IKARI.CHEAT, ICEPALACE. CHEAT. 
Double click on CHEAT.DOC to read the documentation file. After that 
double click on either of the game-poke files. A short pause later and 
a message will appear asking you to insert one of the original game 
disks. Follow the prompts from there. 

No need to make a backup of either disk as the pokes don't write 
directly to disk. 



THIS MONTH'S WINNERS: 

Edward Penman for his fantastic ST Dungeon Master cheat routine. 
He gets a special prize of £60. 

Peter Featherstone gains a gaggle of glorious Amiga games for his 
superb Ice Palace and Ikari Warriors hacks. 

Anthony Cambray wins some super ST software for his vivacious Virus 
tips. 



w m& 



i. 



*> 




'A M 



+1 * J* &^ 






Commander's ID. use Lt 
Commander's ID to leave room. 
Use Commander's ID to open 
Captain's room. Pick up SDI disk 
and use Commander's ID to leave 
room. Go to Engineer's room and 
pick up sonicdriver and Engineer's 
ID. 

Get a weapon and kill squash 
player. Pick up electroboost. Fight 
Ice Lord with sonicdriver and then 
follow corridor above him. Hold 
Engineer's ID and enter passage 
halfway up the corridor. Dodge the 
droid and get to the AWOL offi- 
cer's body. Pick up his ID and put 
it in your pocket. Give electro- 
boost to robomechanic and he will 
give you the ochre code. 

Find main computer and 



insert SDI disk and then the codes 
in the following order: ochre, scar- 
let, blue. When self destruct is ini- 
tiated use Engineer's ID to leave 
control room. When you are back 
in the corridor hold AWOL officer's 
ID. Go to the escape pod (located 
close to the place where you were 
beamed aboard) and walk through 
the force field. You're out. 
Jonathan Atha 
Sheffield 

GIANA SISTERS 

■ Amiga 

Pressing all the keys that make up 
the word ARMIN during the game 
will allow you to skip levels. 
Mark Bowles 



ST DUNGEON MASTER 
CHEAT ON DISK 

The ultimate Dungeon Master cheat routine! Guaranteed you have 

never seen a cheat this slick before. Edward Penman has slaved 

over a sizzling keyboard to bring you over 40k of program that will 

hack Dungeon Master beyond your wildest dreams. Just look what it 

offers: 

m Alter the map at will to create short cuts, new passages and so on. 

■ Fix the game so that doors will open without the need for keys. 

■ Remove secret doors. 

■ Print out plans of alt fourteen levels in the Dungeon. 

Insert the Cover Disk into drive A, double click on the drive A 
icon, double click on the POKES folder when the root directory win- 
dow appears and finally double click on the DMCHEAT.DOC icon. 
Once you've read the documentation (by clicking on SHOW), double 
click on DMCHEAT.PRG. 

Ed's program will run in any resolution, although the higher the 
better. It works by altering a saved game file so it doesn't affect the 
original Dungeon Master disk. However, read the help file present on 
the disk before attempting to alter a saved-game file - you may ruin 
the saved data and lose your position. 

The first two levels can be tuned to your taste. Maps of each 
level can be portrayed on screen and altered. Parts of the map can 
be turned into either corriors or waits, or even blanked out complete- 
ly (this last method is a little drastic and can cause problems). It is 
almost worth buying Dungeon Master just to use Ed's routine. 



56 ■ FORMAT 



QUALSOFT 



SPORTS STRATEGY 

FOOTBALL MANAGEMENT GAMES THE ST DESERVES 



CODA 



Football management games, both Soccer and American Football, have the potential to produce excellent strategy 
games of some considerable sophistication. QUALSOFT produced League Division One in 1 983, and Mexico 86 in 1 985, 
but otherwise the implementation has been infantile. When Coda sent me HEADCOACH for the BBC Micro, 2 years ago, 
I saw an American Football computer game for the first time that measured up to the same standards. QUALSOFT is 
pleased to offer Atari ST users "World of Soccer" and "Head Coach v3", two games I honestly believe will fill a yawning 
gap for those looking for realistic simulations of the real games. 

Malcolm Howard, QUALSOFT 

WORLD OF SOCCER 

International management is the ultimate challenge in soccer. To build a squad of players to defeat the ball playing skills 

of Brazil, the fluid play of Holland, the organisation of West Germany, the counter-attacking of Italy, and the many varied 

styles of many others, demands an insight into the game rare amongst managers let alone fans. Do you exploit a team's 

weaknesses, or play to your own strengths? Do you attack down the flank with wingers, or pierce the centre with powerful 

midfield running? Do you play a flat back four, or use a sweeper or libero? 

In "World of Soccer", players are not just attackers/defenders/midfield but goal poachers, play makeis, ball winners, 

wingers, left, right and centre backs, sweepers (19 types of player in all). The results of matches are oetermined by 

simulated soccer matches controlled by the skills of the opposing players. Strategy is determined by the skills you build 

into your squad, and tactics by the particular skills you use to defeat particular teams. Substitutions and tactical moves 

can be made during the match to change or reinforce your plans. 

For four years, through the Qualifying and Final stages of the European Championship and the World Cup, you will guide 

the European team of your choice. You can prepare for the competitions with friendly matches of your choosing, 

developing your strategy to match the in-form players at your disposal. Success is there for the taking, but it will need 

earning. 

Choose from 33 European squads. The 4 UK home countries have 16 man squads which can be increased to 36 with 

players of your own. A customisation program will allow squads for any of the 33 countries to be created. 

HEAD COACH v3 

On the field 220lb blocks of concrete-on -legs collide, while a small man in a suit paces the touchline stroking his chin. 
He's the Head Coach. He has more tactical skill in his little finger than the MCC can muster in the entire club. Third down 
and 9, he signals to his quarterback. The quarterback takes the snap back into the packet, dummies to his star running 
back, wheels to the right skirting two defenders, motions to throw to his rightside wide receiver and then swings his pass 
back over the pack to his open Tight End. He catches and makes another five yards before being grounded. An eleven 
yard gain and another first down, thanks to 2 hours of rehearsal the previous Thursday afternoon. The crowd cheer the 
quarterback but the head coach knows that his Right Guard really deserves the credit. This is American Football, Chess 
with mobile human pieces. 

It's your first season as a Head Coach in the NFL and you face two pre-season games. You must give as many of your 
45 players a run out to see how they've come through the close season. Through these matches and the time spent at 
training camp you must devise your game plan to face your first NFL game. Over the next 1 6 games you will meet the 
likes of the Chicago Bears, the Washington Redskins, the Dallas Cowboys, the LA Raiders (hiss). Each game will need 
a new plan to exploit the weaknesses and nullify the strengths of such teams, and in the game you will probe their defense 
and try to stifle their offense. Success over these 1 6 matches will put you into the playoffs and in sight of the Superbowl. 
Failure will give you the best of the college draft, which will allow you to make up for the deficiencies you must by now 
have discovered in your side. Providing of course that the club keeps you on . . . 

Let us be straight , Head coach v3 is NOT an arcade game. It's a sophisticated game based on American Football. For 
those who already understand something about the game, it's a chance to find out just how much they really know. For 
those to whom the game appeals but is something of a mystery, then Head Coach v3 is the ideal way to find out what 
the game is all about. In the match itself, you have a choice of 27 offensive plays and 21 defensive plays, and so you 
can bias your plays to suit the skills of your squad and negate those of the opposition. The training camp will give you 
an insight into the current performance of your players, even checking their speed in 40 yard sprints. There's only one 
thing that can prevent your team from eventually achieving a Superbowl place; YOU! But we warn you, this game is 
ADDICTIVE. 

"World of Soccer" and "Head Coach v3" are available from QUALSOFT at £17.50 and £19.95 respectively. 



Dept. STAM 



Tel: 0438 
721936 



18 Hazlemere Road 
Stevenage SG2 8RX 



Please supply: 

World of Soccer □ £17.50 

Head Coach v3 D £19.95 



Name: 

Address: 



Access No. (if applicable)- 



® 



REVIEW 



POWERPLAY 



ARCANA 



Amiga — £19.95, Joystick, mouse 



ST — ,£19.95, under development 



Powerplay is a version of the 
traditional pub quiz machine, 
with more than a passing refer- 
ence to Role Playing Games. Up 
to four players choose teams 
from Greek mythology with which 
to engage in a contest of knowl- 
edge. Play is based on a chequer- 
board of coloured squares, which 
we are reliably informed is in a 
courtyard in the Temple of Apollo. 

Each square represents an 
area of knowledge - general, 
leisure, science or history/geogra- 
phy. Correctly answering a ques- 
tion allows you to move a selected 
character to an adjacent square; 
the objective being to eliminate 
your opponents' pieces from the 
courtyard by landing on their 
squares and engaging in a chal- 
lenge. 

A challenge, since you ask, 
consists of the two players com- 
peting against each other to 
answer questions; the first player 
to gain a three question advan- 
tage wins and the loser's piece is 
removed. As a strength factor is 
added to a character each time a 



-TCflfEffPLfH- 



question is correctly answered it 
becomes a question of manoeu- 
vring your strongest pieces to 
take on challenges. 

When playing the computer, 
the reaction time you are allowed 
as the game progresses gets 
shorter and shorter. Things 
become almost pointlessly difficult 
when you barely have time to read 
the question before you are timed 
out. 

Graphically , Powerplay 

doesn't make anything like an 
interesting use of the Amiga's 
capabilities. Despite animated 




■ Trivial Pursuit was never tike this... 

movement throughout, the sprites 
aren't really well designed or 
defined. With Greek Gods bopping 
up and down it looks more like a 
scene from the local nightclub. 
Sound-wise, the game features 
spot effects providing atmosphere 
for the animated challenge 
sequences. 

Although not delivering either 
graphical power or compulsive 
gameplay, Powerplay is certainly a 
novel approach to the current 
Trivial Pursuit/pub quiz fad. If 



Arcana were to bring out new data 
sets from time to time they might 
be on to a winner. 



moving graphics 2.0 



soundtrack 2.5 



lasting interest 4.5 



overall 55% 



LUXOR 

PARADOX/SOFTWARE HORIZONS 



ST - £14.95. Joystick only. Reviewed. 



Amiga -£14.95, Due end October. 



Luxor might sound like the 
name of an entry for the 
Eurovision Song Contest and with 
the avowed objective being to res- 
cue the beautiful Diora it could 
just be a romantic game. In fact, it 
is a good old shoot-em-up, requir- 
ing an un-remitting forefinger on 
your fire button. 

The aliens range from flying 
saucers to miniature R2D2s and 
there's even an ugly hovering 
creature with a face like an 
armadillo thrown in for good mea- 
sure. Luxor has three levels and a 
great end sequence. It begins with 
a spaceship (which looks like 
some creation out of Blue Peter) 
hatching you onto the plains of the 



evil Okira Empire. From here on in 
you shoot everything in sight 
except the revolving P's and B's. 
When you collect a fuel tank you 
can take a trip onto the next level 
or planet and get ever nearer to 
your beloved Diora. 

An unusual feature of this 
game is the apparition of a fairy. 
You are supposed to gently catch 
her whereupon she will grant you 
one wish, but with all guns blazing 
you usually end up blasting her to 
hell. She's an ugly looking crea- 
ture so she probably originated 
from there in the first place. 
Chasing fairies in a shoot-em-up 
certainly makes a change from 
the usual destroy-the-universe sce- 




nario. Will it catch on? 

The graphics routines look 
almost 3D, but your astronaut 
seems to be leaping around in a 
2D plain. Luxor's digitised sound 
track resembles the old 8-bit 
games - with the volume turned 
up and your ear next to the speak- 
er you can just about make out 
the words 'Get Ready'. If Diora 
looks anything like the fairy then 
you probably won't want to! 

Mark Higham 



■ Watch the Okira warriors disap- 
pear in a puff of orange smoke 
and wait for the fairy to appear. 



still graphics 4.0 

moving graphics 3.0 



soundtrack 2.0 



lasting interest 2.0 



overall 60% 



58 ■ FORMAT 



STARGOOSE 



REVIEW 



LOGOTRON 

ST - £19.95. Mousejoystick. 



A vertical scroller in the 
Goldrunner/ Xenon 
vein will always attract 
serious attention from the 
confirmed shoot-em- 

uppers amongst you, and 
when the blast-out features 
the addition of contoured 



landscapes from messrs 
Cain and Everett, the Boys 
who brought you Black 
Lamp, you'll be tempted to 
buy with only a passing 
glance at reviews. But 
geese in space? Whatever 
next? 



■ Jewel to be 
collected 


4 Steer well 
clear of these 










' 


















L ^.^^^H 







■ The 
Stargoose 



I Bonus missiles 
I A mine 



I Bonus t\ 
I 



U£ 



Sk £. A. / / / / 



■ Current ■ Stargeese m 



■ These crystals turn ■ Current ■ Stargeese 

blue as you collect supplies remaining 

their counterparts 



Missiles 



GAMEPLAY 

The task ahead of you as commander of a Stargoose hover-ship is 
quite straightforward - you have to negotiate eight looped levels of 
heavily defended surfaces, and find and collect six crystals in each. 
Control is best achieved with the joystick - the mouse option is 
decidely unresponsive - and movement consists solely of side-to- 
side movement. Missiles are of more use than line-of-sight lasers in 
tight situations as they skim the contoured surface like cruise mis- 
siles rather than just taking a mountain out. Loading and firing the 
missiles is a little awkward, however, requiring presses of the [Alt] 
and [Caps] keys. 

The opposition consists of fixed laser/bomb turret installations 
and moving attack vehicles whose shots gradually deplete your 
shield levels. As the levels progress you find yourself having to go 
faster and faster, but the more experienced among you won't find 
the challenge too daunting. 

Ammo, fuel and missiles will all need replenishing and this is 
achieved by manoeuvring your craft through the open mouths of por- 
tals. You then find yourself in a wire-frame tunnel full of large blue 
eyes which you must steer into to top up your supplies. Curious eh? 

Although there is no save game option, Stargoose will restart on 
the level you last achieved. Restarting on, say, level 4 will take you 
back to the speed of level 1 so you can take it at a more manage- 
able pace. 



Amiga — £19.95. Version imminent. 



GRAPHICS AND SOUND 

Logotron describe Stargoose as featuring full-Beef Scroll' - a curi- 
ous little term denoting a full use of screen width and height with 
superimposed status information. The look they're after is coin-op 
arcade - no fancy screen surround to make up for a reduced play 
area - just full-beef scroll with variable speed. Wild concept, guys! 

But it's the relief surfaces which make the game unique. Each 
level has mapped contours of increasing complexity accompanied 
by cycling colour shifts. Although at slower speeds the surfaces are 
solid enough to scrol! smoothly they do tend to begin to strobe as 
speed increases in later levels. It's a pity also that whilst the map- 
ping of surfaces changes from level to level the design doesn't sig- 
nificantly alter as, say, in the other recent Logotron release, 
StarRay. Along with a repetitive music track and unimpressive spot 
sound effects this detracts from what could have been a game 
you'd return to again and again. 



■ Have a 
gander at 
those saucy 
surfaces. 
You take out 
a couple of 
mines and 
make your 
way to the 
fuel portal 




m Life as an intergalactic goose 
can get quite hairy! 



CONCLUSION 

Stargoose scores in its use of 
relief-mapped surfaces and an 
original method of restocking 
supplies but fails to deliver 
enough variety in gameplay to 
qualify as a classic. If it's well- 
executed minimalism you're 
after then Stargoose delivers; 
otherwise there's been no 
golden eggs hatched here. 



still graphics 




Wj^M ^E^^^F^I HEJ 






moving graphics 




d K^HV ^E3 






soundtrack 




[^H ^E^^^F^| ^E3 








lasting interest 




V^M ^E^^^ES 








overall 68% 



FORMAT ■ 59 



REVIEW 

ELITE 



MR. MICRO/FIREBIRD 



ST - £24.95. Joystick, mouse. 



Is there anyone out there 
who hasn't played Elite? 
David Braben and Ian Bell's 
classic finally makes it to 
the ST and picks up solid 
3D colour graphics on the 
way. Five years ago this 
game revolutionised the 
concept of computer gam- 



ing in so far as it provided 
scale, depth and open-end- 
edness in a compulsive mix 
of intergalactic trade and 
combat guaranteed to 
totally absorb. And all that 
in 32K. So how well has it 
converted? 



I Vou're about to dock at the orbiting space station... 

Nearest spacestation indicator 
■ Space station 




■ Shield strength ■ Missiles left H Short range scanner 
Laser temperature ■ An approaching shuttle Fuef ceffs 




■ Can't get you out of my crosshair... your enemy launches a desperate 
last salvo (upper right). 



Amiga - £24.95. Under development. 



GAMEPLAY 

Alongside Firebird's soon-to-be-released Frontier and Gremlin's 
Federation of Free Traders (reviewed last month), Elite's 2,000 plan- 
etary systems strung across 8 galaxies might seem a little confined 
- but how much space do you need? Elite offers two styles of game- 
play which should satisfy aficionados of both arcade and strategy 
games. 

You start off with your ship docked just off the planet Lave f an 
arsenal of three missiles and a pulse laser, fuel for a hyperspace 
jump of 7 lightyears, 100 credits and a rating as Harmless. At this 
point you can choose to stock up on various commodities for future 
trading. By playing the intergalactic stock market you can accrue 
sufficient credits to stock up on 14 types of hardware and arma- 
ments - galactic hyperdrives, military lasers, fuel scoops and 
escape capsules among them. Docking computers might be your 
best buy though as attempting to dock with a revolving dodecahe- 
dral space station involves manual dexterity that wouldn't go amiss 
at NASA. Then you knuckle down to some raw aggression and com- 
mence the long climb through the ranks of Mostly Harmless, Poor, 
Average, Above Average, Competent, Dangerous, Deadly and, ulti- 
mately, Elite. 

If this wasn't enough, there a number of different types of 
aggressive strategy you can adopt as an alternative to the rather 
mundane career of trading. You can go bounty hunting for pirates, or 
become a renegade pirate yourself, go asteroid mining or merely 
engage in illegal trading of firearms, narcotics and slaves. For years 
if you so wish. Randomisers in gameplay mean no two games will be 
the same. Good job there's a save option then, isn't it? 




■ Getting the low down on the 
planet you're about to pillage 




■ At the stores: play the inter- 
galactic stockmarket, trading in 
any of the items pictured. 



GRAPHICS AND SOUND 



ST Elite has screens of 16 colours which, for the 
old hands amongst you (read 'purists'), might be 
akin to colourising an old Chaplin film. Whilst the 
mainly mono versions provided a certain atmo- 
sphere, it's no surprise the addition of colour 
comes over as a touch gaudy. But then the solid 
3D graphics more than make up for this. There's 
now a realism which no amount of wire-frames 



could provide. Movement is smooth enough but 
we're not talking state of the art solid velocities 
here - we're talking about a game which is five 
years old, and in this business may as well be five 
decades. What you've got is a faithful rendition of a 
classic with solid colour and a few extra missions - 
no radical overhauls here - the sound department 
is distinctly on the two-bit side of eight-bit. 



CONCLUSION 

You can't help feeling a sense 
of nostalgia as Elite boots up 
and you scan the galaxy for 
the best deal to be had. If 
you've never played it before 
then it's worth buying just to 
find out what you've been 
missing all these years. 
Otherwise it's time to move 
on. Watch out for Elite 2 
though - any bets it appears 
on the Archimedes first? 



still graphics 




in i^^ev HLJ 






moving graphics 




E9 ^E3HE9 IE3 






soundtrack 




FIB ^F^^HF^fl ^EJ 






lasting interest 




overall 75% 



60 ■ FORMAT 



ATARI COMPUTERS 
NEW FROM ATARI 

ANNOUNCING THE 520 STFM 
SUPER PACK 



THIS PACK INCLUDES A 520 STFM WITH A 

BUILT IN 1MB DISK DRIVE. 

CX40 JOYSTICK 

ORGANISER-A suite of business software (including 

diary, spreadsheet, word processor and database). 

SOFTWARE-Arkanoid II, Quadralien, Buggy Boy, 

Chopper X, Ikari Warrior. Marble Madness, Black 

Lamp, Ranarama, Return to Genesis, Roadwars, 

Thrust. Starquake, Wizball. Xenon, Zynaps, Beyond 

the Ice Palace, Thundercats, Test Drive, Seconds 

Out. Summer Olympiad, Eddie Edwards Super Ski. 

TOTAL VALUE OF SOFTWARE OVER £450 

PLUS 

5 PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE DISKS 

ST BASIC AND TUTORIAL BOOKS 

RRP £399.99 OFFER PRICE £360.00 

ATARI 520 ST-M PACKS 



BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND 
AT NEW LOW PRICES 

PACK 1. 520 ST-M 1/2MB SF354 drive 

and mouse. Offer Price £260.00 

PACK 2. 520 ST-M 1MB SF31 4 drive 

and mouse. Offer Price £285.00 

PACK 3. 520 ST M 1/2MB SF354 drive, 

mouse and mono monitor 

Offer Price £350.00 

PACK 4. 520 ST-M. 1MB SF314 drive, 

mouse and mono monitor 

Offer Price £380.00 

Plus 5 Public Domain Software Disks 

ST Basic and Tutorial Book 



C 



GAMES 



NEW RELEASES 

NOVEMBER 88 



ST / AM 
13.-95 



Elite 

EPT 16.95 

Espionage 13.95 

Green Beret 16.95 

Gryzor 16.95 

Pacmania 13.95 

Rally Run 13.95 

U.M. Simulator 16.95 

DECEMBER 88 

Airball 16.95 

Creature 16.95 

Fright Night 13.95 

Gunship 13.95 

P.O.W 16.95 

Top Gun 16.95 

All the above will be despatched on the day of 
release in the case of advanced orders. 



r 



SPECIAL OFFER 



STOS (The Game Creator) 

Create fast, exciting games quickly and easily 

RRP £29.95 \OUR PRICE £20,95 



FOR COMPREHENSIVE 
LIST OF ALL:- 

Atari / Commodore Computers, 

Monitors, Disc Drives. 

Printers, Blank Discs, 

Liesure / Business Software. 

Cables, Accessories, etc. 

AT COMPETITIVE RATES AND WITH REGULAR 
UPDATES, PLEASE PHONE OR WRITE. 



* 



| AMIGA COMPU TERS" 

AMIGA A500 
NEW LOW PRICE 

" Mulli tasking 'Custom Chips' 

"Bliner Chip "16 Bit Processor* 

'Wimp ' 1MB Double Sided Disk Drive* 

*51 2K Ram* Quality Sound & Speech* 

"Graphics 4096 Colours at once* 

£499.99 

NOW ONLY £399.99 

A500 & A1084 COLOUR MONITOR 

RRP £649.99 

SPECIAL OFFER 
£630.00 



AMIGA A500 BUSINESS PACKS 
AMIGA A500 MONO PACK 



Amiga A500 Computer £399.99 

1900M Mono Monitor £99.99 

Citizen Dot Matrix Printer £251 .85 

The Works Software £149.99 

Transformer PC Emulator £49.99 

TOTAL RRP £951.99 

PACK DISCOUNT -£262.96 

PACK PRICE £688.85 

AMIGA A500 COLOUR PACK 

Amiga A500 Computer £399.99 

A1 084 Colour Monitor £299.99 

Citizen Dot Matrix Printer £251 .85 

The Works £149.99 

Transformer PC Emulator £49.99 

TOTAL RRP £1151.81 

PACK DISCOUNT £347.96 

PACK PRICE £803.85 



FOR COMPREHENSIVE LIST:- 

Amiga 2000. Atari 1040. Mega ST's. 
Commodore & Atari PC's. Please phone or wine 




A 
R 

R 
A 

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r 



GAMES 



ST / 

3D Galax 13.35 

Army Moves 13.95 

Alternative Games 13.95 

Arkanoid Rev of Doh 13.35 

Annals ol Rome 16.50 

Alternative Reality 
Alien Strike 

Black Lamp 13.35 

Blue War 13.35 



B.Lee Ent the Draqon 

Backlash 13.95 

Barbarians II (PAL) 

Barbarians (PSYG) 16.50 

California Games 16.95 

Captain Blood 

Cha/Ship Baseball 16.50 

Combat School 

Classiques one 13.35 

Chopper X 6.75 

Cha-Ship Wrestling 17.40 

Colonial Quest 20.95 

Carrier Command 16.50 

Cha'Stup Backgammon 
Dungeon Master 

Defender of Crown 19.50 

Dizzy Wozard 13.35 

Dreadnought 13.95 

Expfora 

Epyx Epics 20.95 

E.C.O 13.35 

Fighter Command 

Flight Simulator II 27.95 

Fright Night 13.95 

F-15 Eagle Strike 16.50 

GFL Football 16.50 

Goldregons Domain 

Grand Slam 16.95 

Gary Li-Kar Hotshot 

Gunship 16 50 

Guantlei 17.50 

Grandslam 

GFL Cha/Ship Golf 

Hoi Ball 1695 

Heroes of Lance 
Hoi Shot 
Helter Skelter 

Hum for Red October 16.50 

International Karate 13.35 

I Ludricous 
Impossible Mission II 

Ikari Wariors 9.95 

International Soccer 13.35 

KarttngGrand Prix 6.75 

Kings Ouest 3 pack 16.50 

Karate 16.50 

Karate Master 8.65 



13.95 
9.95 
13.35 

13.95 
13.95 
13.95 
13.95 
16.50 
16.95 
16.95 

16.95 



6.75 
16.95 
19.50 



20.95 
34.95 



16.50 
13.95 



16.50 
16.50 
16.95 
16.95 
13.95 
10.45 
16.50 

16.95 
16.95 

13.95 
6.75 
16.50 



Kristal 

Lands of Legend 

Las Vegas Gambler 

Leviathan 

Liesure Larry 

Mars Cops 

Motor Bike Madness ... 

Mortville Manor 

Metro Cross 

Olympic Challenge 

Planet Fall 

Protector 

Police Quest 

Psion Chess 

Power Pae* 

Pacland 

Pool of Radiance 
Paper Boy 
Road Blasters 
Revenge II 

Rim Runner 

Rogue 

Ringwars 

Ranarama 

Rocket Ranger 

Sky Raider 

Space Harrier 

Star Wars 

Space Station 

Star Trek 

Star Glider 2 

Storm Trooper 

Supercycle 

Space Quest II 

Solomans Key 

Space Ace 

Super Sprint 

Sky Fighter 

Strip Poker 

Sky Chase 

Speed Run 

Street Gang 

Side Arms 
Terroforce 

Telra Quest 

Terramax 

Trivial Pursuit 

Typhoon 

The Wrath of Nik<Mus 

Ultima 4 

U.M. Simulator 

vectorbaii 

Verminator 

Virus 

Vegas Gambler 

Whirligig 

Warzone 



...6.75 
.9.95 
.19.95 
.13.95 
.10.45 
.16.50 
.17.50 

.19.50 
.13.35 
13.35 
16.50 

.13.95 



.13.95 
...6.75 
.16.95 
.13.35 

...9.95 
.13.35 
.13 35 
.16 50 
.11.35 
.1650 
.13.95 
. 17.40 
.13 35 
.13.95 
.13.35 
..9.95 
...9.95 
13.35 

.13.95 
.10.45 



.13.95 
.13.35 
.13.35 
13.35 
.16.50 
.16.50 
.16.50 

16.95 

.16 50 
.13.35 
. 13.35 



AM 

16.95 

20.95 

13.35 
13.95 
13.95 
10.45 
16.50 

16.95 



13.35 

13.35 
13.95 
16.95 
13.95 
16.95 
10.45 

6.95 



16.95 
9.00 
10.45 
13.35 



10.45 
16.95 
13.95 



BUSINESS SOFTWARE 



ATARI 




■ACCOUNTING" 


RRP / 

Your Financial Future 24.95 

Bookkeeper 113.85 

Home Accounting 24.95 


OUR 

16.95 
79.75 
16.95 


•DBASES SPREADSHEETS' 


Data Manager Prof-Nai 69.95 

DigiCalc 39 95 

Sup'Base Prof'Sional 249.95 

Tnmbase 89.95 


48.95 
27.95 
175.00 
62.95 


■LANGUAGES UTILS* 



GFA Basic AD/CED Prog 

GFA Basic Interpreter 

GFA Compiler 

Fast Basic (Disk) 

Fast Basic (CTridge) 

Fast ASM 

Run Time Disk 

DT Doctor 

Lattice C 

Macro Assembler 

Lisp 

Pascal 

P.C Ditto 



..19 50 
.45.95 
. 45.95 

.44.85 
.89.50 
.19.95 
..11.50 
..19.95 
.99.95 
.49 95 
99.95 
..89.95 
.89 95 



■MISCELLANEOUS* 



Degas Elite 

GFA Artist 

Fleet St Publisher 

GFA Draft Plus 

K. Comm II 

K. Graph II 

K. Ram ST 

K. Rogel 

K.Seka 

Mailshot 

Mailshot Plus 

Neochrome 

Paintworks 

Paint Pad 

Paint Pad Library I 

Programming Book ... 
Pro Sound Designer .. 
Pro Sprite Designer ... 
Quantrum Parnt 



24.95 
...49.95 

115.00 
.139 95 
...49.95 
. .49.95 

.29.95 
...49.95 
...49.95 
...24.95 
...49.95 
...39.95 
...34.99 
...49.95 
.24.95 
... 17.50 
...57.44 
...39.95 

.19.95 



■ WORD PROCESSING" 



K. Word If . 

K.Spell 

Pretext 



..50.95 
.19.95 
..79.95 



13.75 
32.00 
32.00 
31.40 
62.95 
13.95 
8.00 
13.95 
69.95 
34.95 
69.95 
62.95 
62.95 



16.95 
34.95 
80.50 
98.00 
34.95 
34,95 
20.95 
34.95 
34.95 
16.95 
34.95 
27.95 
24.50 
34.95 
16.95 
12.25 
40.00 
27.95 
13.95 



41.50 
13.95 
55.95 



AMIGA 



■COMMUNICATIONS* 


RRP 

Diga 57.70 


/ OUR 

40.25 






■DBASES SPREADSHEETS" 


S/Base Prof'sionai 249.95 

File II SG 6995 

K. Data 49 95 

Logislix 114.95 


175,00 
48.95 
34.95 
80 50 


"LANGUAGES UTILS" 



3D Graphics 

AD CedStG Fu Qns .. 

Basic Language 

Business Graphics 

Developers Toolkit 

Runtime system 

Sci-Tific Grpahics 

Sorting Searching 

LarticeC 

Audio Master 

Sonix 

Toolkit 

Amiga File 

BBS-PC 

Brainstorm 

Drum Studio 

Gozmos 5 

Toolkit 



Digiview Adapter 

Digiview 2.0 

Li is. Camera. AC On .. 
Animator I Images 

Animator 

Chmate 

Drawplus 

Impact 

Ltxmate 

Video Scope 3D 

Video Tiller 

Zuma Font I 

Zuma Font 2 

Zuma Font 3 



39.95 
..39.95 
..69 95 
..3995 

39.95 

69.95 
..39.95 

39.95 



27.95 
27.95 
4895 
27.95 
27 95 
48.95 
27.95 
27.95 



172.50 120.50 
46.00 32.00 



57 50 
. 39.95 
.49 95 
..99 95 
...995 
.39.95 
..49.95 
. 39.95 



...22.95 
.185.00 
...57.50 
.103 50 
...57.50 
.34,95 



40.25 
2795 
34.95 
69 95 
6.95 
27.95 
34.95 
27 95 



16.00 
1 29.00 
43.00 
72.25 
40 25 
24.50 



198.95 139.25 
. 63.25 44.25 



. .49.95 
143.75 
1 10.40 
...1995 
...19.95 
... 19.95 



34.95 
99.95 
77.00 
1395 
13.95 
13 95 



'WORD PROCESSING- 



Excellence 

Prowrite 

Scribble 

Word Perfect 

The Works (INT) . 



.199.95 139.95 

...75.00 52.50 

....69.95 48 95 

.22885 155.00 

....99.99 74.95 



Please Send Cheques / PO To: 

Prices INC VAT 
Mail Order Only 



ARRAN COMPUTERS 
31 , Branksome Rd 

Heaton Norris 

Stockport. SK4 2AG 

061 - 442 0640 



State make and model 
of Computer 

P & P Free UK only 

Overseas Add £1 .00 

Airmail Add £2.00 

Recorded Del £2.50 



A 
R 
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A 

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A 

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A 

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REVIEW 



VETERAN 



SOFTWARE HORIZONS 



ST - £14.95. Mouse. 



Amiga — £14.95. Under development. 



First off the line for Software 
Horizons' Yugoslavian prod- 
ucts, Veteran is an Operation 
Wolf clone which attempts to 
catch the deadly realism of a com- 
mando going about his everyday 
business. Given the country of ori- 
gin, at least your foes aren't the 
poor, beleaguered commies this 
time. 

The three levels of battle fea- 
ture enemy soldiers, personnel 
carriers, tanks, choppers and gun 
emplacements, all trying their 
best to cut you down. It's up to 



you to level them and pick up the 
extra ammo and rocket launchers 
they leave behind. You start the 
game by choosing between four 
automatic rifles - a Mauser, 
Heckler and Koch, Kalashnikov 
and last, but by no means least, 
the 1 100 or so rounds a minute of 
an Ingrams M-10. It's then a sim- 
ple task of moving the mouse to 
target the victim with cross hairs 
and fire or launch a rocket. The 
game ends when you take out the 
enemy's HQ on level three. 

Animation and sound is rea- 




sonable, though men and 
machines do tend to jerk their way 
onto the battlefield under a cover 
of digitised fire and explosions - 
but the highlight is undoubtedly 
the chunky close-ups of a soldier 
in his death throes. Hardly for the 
squeamish, but then if you buy 
this you're probably a veteran of 
more simulated armed combat 
than your average Gl and won't 
find constant carnage a problem. 
Hats off to Horizons for com- 



1 


I ^ 


■ Choose your hardware - 
whether it's the deadly Ingram or 
the equally lethal Soviet 
Kalashnikov, you can be sure that 
you're in store for some seriously 
unsociable behaviour. 


RICK VOU 









m If it moves kill it If it's gold, 
pick it up for extra ammo and 
rockets 

ing in at under £15 but then at a 
higher price Veteran wouldn't be 
worth an outing. Even now it's 
pushing it's luck a bit - it needs 
more levels, more varied action 
and a much faster load time 
between levels. 



still graphics 3.0 
moving graphics 3.0 



soundtrack 4.0 



lasting interest 2.0 



overall 60% 



OPERATION 
NEPTUNE 



INFOGRAMES 



Amiga — £24.95. Joystick only. Reviewed 



ST - £24.95. Joystick only. Imminent 



Infogrames' second game, 
after Hostages, couldn't be 
more different from the first. Set 
at something approaching twenty 
thousand leagues under the 
Pacific, Operation Neptune- is a 
sub-aquatic seek-and-destroy 

shoot-em-up involving four distinct 
missions. You begin by being 
dropped with your jet scooter to 
the ocean waves where you have 
to fend off enemy riders with your 
feet before your sub surfaces and 
takes you on board. Once aboard, 
a small screen shows you the 
ocean floor and you can scroll a 
map showing the local environs. 
Here you will find the location of 
your sides' bases which you can 
use to refuel oxygen and power 
and identify enemy positions. By 
clicking on a chosen destination 



you are transported through the 
remarkably clear and welt-lit 
depths taking care to dodge or 
blast your way past various obsta- 
cles. Mines are one of the hidden 
dangers here. 

On your way, you may also be 
alerted to two other kinds of com- 
bat. An inset appears showing 
your despatch to an airlock. Once 
on swim-about you either find 
yourself in flippered fisticuffs with 
enemy frogmen, scanners, sharks 
and octopi or dodging high-speed 
underwater jet-subs firing charges 
your way. In both instances, 
aggressive use of the joystick nor- 
mally consigns all assailants to 
Davey Jones' Locker. By the time 
you make it to an enemy base 
you'll have no compunction about 
feeding those guys to the fish. 




■ What do 
you call a 
couple of 
Frenchmen 
wearing 
flippers? 



Operation Neptune is a little 
disappointing in the graphics 
department. The submarine view 
screen is pretty small, the under- 
water scenery pretty repetitive 
and the exterior shots pretty 
weedy. Conversely, sound is more 
than okay when it comes to atmo- 
spherics but the background 
music is a bit over-melodramatic. 

Being underwater rather than 
in outer space makes Neptune an 
interestingly designed game, but 
it's let down by a lack of breadth. 



There's simply not enough here to 
engross you time after time. Still, 
plenty more fish in the sea... 




62 ■ FORMAT 



^ THE BEST REASON FOR BUYING AN ATARI 

MAIL ORDER POOLS-SYSTEM !! (TM) TRADE WELCOME ^5 

INCORPORATING - POOLSBUSTER & POOLSPLANNER ^ 



OTHERS CALL THEIR POOLS PROGRAMS ULTIMATE. WE CALL OURS "THE" POOLS PROGRAM. 

r nere were and still are a couple of pools programs for the Atari ST that guarantee to you performance better than chance (?) or promise to you power? to forecast the pools the way you want. 

Others are asking you for disk for free demos while weeks are going by and you are missing your chance for a dividend. Nevertheless pools-system still remains the only one in the market that 

delivers the goods. Lets have a look at some facts. Fact user friendly and stiil the only one that does not require you to be some kind of a football expert or hot shot system analyser. Fact pools 

systems is the only one that performed even slightly during the difficult & unpredictable Australian season. Fact 13/8/88. 4 aways out of the recommended first 6. 10 homes out of the 

recommended first 15. 20/8/88 Start of the English season, the system trapped 9 out of the 14 score draws & all 4 no score draws. 27/8/88 9 out of the 12 score draws & 3 out of 6 no score 

draws. 4 homes out of the recommended first 6. 3/9/88, 6 homes out of the recommended first 7, 4 aways out of the recommended 6. 5 out of the 7 score draws & 2 out of the 3 no score draws. 

40 correct results out of the 58 possible. Fact, all forecasted printouts available at any time for any checks. So do not waste your time with any other programs or systems. They are not going 

to entertain your hopes or wishes. And to top all the facts, we guarantee the Pools-System performs better than any other pools program in the market on any computer, because we guarantee 

to you that using the Poolsbuster in cooperation with Poolsplanner you are going to win the pools more than once a year. 

STOP PRESS!! What does the customer say: "I was very impressed with the general standa r d of the progams & their ease of use. I had a look around the program & worked out how to input 
the data without the use of the manual which shows just how good the program structure is set out. To get to the point, the very first entry I did came up trumps with 2 lines of 21 1.2 points. It 
brought me a win of £1 1 .88. Not bad for a first attempt. Thanks for an amazing program. Regards P.J. L.Solihull. (Name & Address with held for obvious reasons.) 
&■& Poolsbusters costs only $35.00 inclusive P&P Poolsplanner costs only £20 inclusive P&P. 3-fr 

izti For a limited period. Buy both programs and save yourself £15.00. &# 



APOLONIA SOFTWARE (TM) PRESENTS: COMPUSHOT 1 - THE BEST PRICES FOR ATARI AND THEST AND AMIGA HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE. JUST HAVE A LOOK AT SOME EXAMPLES 



*# SOFTWARE LANGUAGES BUSINESStfrir 

Pools-System £40.00 

Hi-Soft Basic Atari £69.00 

Power Basic Atari £46.00 

APL68000 Atari £86.25 

Fast ST Basic (Rom) Atari £76.68 

Fast ST Basic (Disk)-Atari £38.27 

Run Time Disk (Fast Basic)-Atairi £10.64 

Back Pack (Rom)-Atari £44.85 

Lisp (Metacomco)-Atari Amiga £143.75 

Pascal(Metacomco)-Atan Amiga £83.95 

Expert Systems(lnfogrms)-Atari £75.90 

Forth MT(Abacus)-Atari £42.55 

FTL Modula 2 (Hi-Soft)-Atan £62.10 

FTL Editor Toolkit -Atari £39.97 

GFA Basic Interpreter-Atari £40.25 

GFA Basic Compiler-Atari £40.25 

LatticeC (Metacomco)-Atan £89.70 

Devpac ST-V2.00-Atari,'Amiga £49.45 

Logistix (Grafox)-Atari £95.45 

Masterplan (Ditek)-Atari £69.00 

VIP Professional Gem-Atari £110.40 

Superbase Professional-Atari £1 90.23 

Superbase Personal- Atari/Amiga £77.29 

Fleet Street Publisher-Atari £98.51 

Signum (Signa)-Atan £160.00 

1st Word Plus (GST)-Atari £65.00 

Wordwriter (Timeworks)-Atari £65.00 

ST Doctor (Computer Concepts} £16.00 

Disk Doctor (Antic)-Atari £22.92 

Prosound Designer- Atari £52.97 

Pro Midi (Sampler Player)-Atari £15.00 

Pro Sound with Midi-Atari £61.23 

Quantum Paint (Eidersoft)-Atan £19.47 

Quantum Paint Proff. (+Toolkit) £27.28 

ST Omnires (Sof. Colour/Mono Switch ) £33.48 

Turbo ST (Software Blitter)-Atari £33.48 

PC-Ditto-Atari (IBM EMUL.) £60.98 

Flash-Bak & Flash-Cache (High Speed Hard Disk 

Utilities) For the Atari ST £28.43 

Saved 1 (The Desk Accessory)-Atari £24.20 

Hi-Soft WERCS. (Wimp Environment Resource 
Construction Set. Easy to use and powerful RCS. 
Works in any resolution. Intuitive environment 

& complete facilities) £24.20 

TWIST The best software switcher. Up to 1 4 programs 

resident at the same time-Atari £24.20 

STAC . The best adventure creating program 
for the Atari. Creating your own adventures 

for fun or sale £29.08 

Acquisition-Amiga £183.90 

Digi Paint (PAL)-Amiga £34.91 

Digi View V 3.0 (Inc Adapter) - Amiga £136.00 

Digi Droid-Amiga £56.50 

Photon Paint- Amiga £53.50 

Express Paint V2.0-Amiga £46.30 

Face 11 Amiga £19.00 

F-Basic -Amiga £55.50 

X CAD Amiga £333.50 

Pro Write V.2.0 - Amiga £65.00 

Kind Words-Amiga £39.50 

Analyze! V.2.0 (Brown Waugh) Amiga £107.75 



Scribble (Brown Waugh)-Amiga 85.00 

Organize (Brown Waugh)-Amiga £85.00 

BBS-PC! (Brown Waugh}-Amiga £85.00 

Publisher 1000 (Brown Waugh)-Amiga £160.00 

Music Studio (Activision)-Amiga £29.00 

Lattice C (Metacomco)-Amiga £99.00 

Lattice C Prof (Metacomco)-Amiga £230.00 

Studio Magic- Amiga £50.00 

Pro Sound Designer (Complete)-Amiga £65.00 

Pro Sound(Software only)Amiga £27.00 

Pro Sound Designer with Midi Amiga £76.00 

Pro Midi (Midi Sampler for PSD)-Amiga £27.00 

Pro Sound Too! Kit-Amiga £27.00 

Atari 520 STFM (new) 1MB Drive with FREE £400^ 
worth of Software plus Compushop 1 Starter Kit 
£349. 00. Atari 520 STFM as above plus Pools- 
System -£359.00 



Atari 1040STFM(New)+Compushot 1 Starter ...£449.00 

Atari 1040STFMas above + Pools-System £459.00 

Atari 104 STFM + Mono Mon £533.00 

Atari 1040STFM + Mono + PLSTM £549.00 

Atari Mega ST2 + Compushot 1 Starter £775.00 

Mega ST2 as above + Pools-System £785.00 

Mega ST2 + Mono + Starter £865.00 

Mega ST2 + Mono + Starter + Pools- System .. £875.00 

Mega ST4 (4MB RAM ) + Starter £1050.00 

Mega ST4 + Starter + Pools-System £1070.00 

Mega ST4 + Mono + Starter £1140.00 

Mega ST4 as above + PLSSTM £1150.00 

Mega ST2 + Mono + Laser Printer + 

Fleet St Publisher + 1st Word + Starter £1999.00 

Mega ST2 as above + PLSSTM £2009.00 

Mega ST4 + Mono + Laser Printer +Fleet St. 
Publisher 1st Word+20MB Hard Disk+Starter.. £2698.00 

Mega ST4 as above + PLSSTM £2710.00 

Triangle 1MB 2nd Drive-Atari £95.00 

Triangle Dble 3.5" Drive-only for the Atari STs 

andSTMs-notfortheSTFMs £179.00 

Triangle 2.5" Drive 40/80 Track Atari £130.00 

Triangle 5.25" with PC Ditto Atari £199.00 

Triangle IBM 2nd Drive Amiga £85.00 

Triangle Internal A2000 31.2" Kit £79.00 

Cumana 1MB 2nd Drive Atari £112.90 

Cumana IMB2nd Drive-Amiga £125.00 

Atrari 20MB Hard Disk Drive (SH205) £548.00 

Triangle 20MB Hard Disk Drive-Atari £435.00 

Triangle 40MB Hard Drive-Atari £603.18 

Supra 20MB Hard Drive £502.97 

Supra 30MB Hard Drive £633.40 

Miracle WS2000 MODEM (Atari-Amiga) £115.00 

Miracle WS4000 MODEM (Atari-Amiga) £169.00 

Linnet MODEM (Atari-Amiga) £140.00 

Series Four 2123S MODEM (Atari-Amiga) £260.00 

Nightingale MODEM (Amiga) Man. Dia £110.00 

RS232 MODEM Cable (Atari-Amiga) £12.00 

Printer Cable (Amiga/ST) £12.00 



STToSCARTCable £12.00 

Atari SLM804 Laser Printer +SLMC804 £1129.99 

Epson NLX800 DOT Matrix 9 Pin Print £277.50 

Star LClO-Mono/DOT Matrix/' 9 Pin £240.00 

Star LC1 0-Colour/DOT Matrix/ 9 Pin £260.00 

Star LC24-10/24 Pin-Multifont £387.55 

Star Laser Printer 8 (1MB Standard) £1740.89 + VAT 

Eider Soft Graphic Tablet - Atari/Amiga .. £239.03 + VAT 

Amiga 500 + Starter Kit £318.00 + VAT 

As Above + Modulator £336.00 + VAT 

Amiga 500+1084Colour Mon+Starter £548.30 + VAT 

Amiga 500 Business Pack (A500 + Mono 
Monitor +Printer + The Works+Transformer- 

Mono Text IBM-PC EMUL) £559.23+ VAT 

Amiga 500 as above but with A1084 colour 

monitor instead of the Mono Monitor £674.00 + VAT 

Amiga Modulator A520 £23.50 

A501 EXP Board with Clock £110.00 

Amiga 1084 Colour Monitor £245.21 + VAT 

Amiga 2000 £976.50 + VAT 

Amiga 2000 -1084 Colour Mon £1151.75 + VAT 

Amiga 20MB Hard DRive for 2000 £620.00 

Micron 2MB Mem.Expansion -A2000 £370.42 + VAT 

Micron 2 MB Mem.Expansion - 

A500/A1000 £391 .72+ VAT 

Pro RAM2000 (8MB RAM) Unpopulated . £198.00 +VAT 

Flicker Fixer £281.50 +VAT 

Genlock A5000/A2000- (A8802) £212.60 +VAT 

Proff. Genlock A500/A20000-(A8806) £605.00 + VAT 

Perfect Vision (Real Time VID Digit) £151.13+ VAT 

A1010 1MB 2nd Drive (All Amigas) £117.94 + VAT 

Midi Interface (Standard Serial) -Amiga £25.00 

Philips CM8833 Slero Col Mon £239.10 + VAT 

Philips CM8852 High Res Col Mon £269.20 + VAT 

Amiga 1900M Mono Monitor £84.10 + VAT 

Monitor Station (Tilt & Swivel) for all 

12" & 14" monitors £18.95 

Monitor Master (Best in the market for any Atari 
ST,520,1040 Mega STs-Colour/Mono Switch Box. £30. 00 
Mouse Master (Unique Mouse & Joystick 
Switch. Allows connection of 2 Joysticks & 
a Mouse or any other Controller with any 
combination that you'll require. No unplugging 
cables. The best Mouse/Joystick Port Contrlller) 

Atari/Amiga £21.00 

Mouse Path (The best Mouse Mat around. 
Special anti-static & unique surface for 
a better grip & short distance travel. Perfect 

for any Mouse on any Computer) £5.50 

Monitor Stands ( Very elegant and specially made 

to fit any Atari or any Amiga computer) £24.00 

Unistand Printer Stand £9.50 

PVC Dust Cover - Mega STs £7.50 

PVC Dust Cover - 520STFM, 1040STFM £4.00 

PVC Dust Cover -SC1223, SM125 £5.00 

Disk Boxes: 40 * 3.5" Disks £8.95 

Disk Boxes: 80 ' 3.5" Disks £10.95 

Disk Boxes: 100 ' 3.5" Disks £12.95 

Disk Boxes: 120 ' 3.5" Disk £13.95 

Disk Boxes: 50 ' 5.25" Disks £8.95 

Disk Boxes: 120' 5.25" Disks £13.95 



New Atari PC3 IBM-PC compatible with switchable dock speed-4.77 MHZ or 8MHZ 8088 Micro Processor. EGA.CGA+Hercules Graphics Modes. Built in Twin Drive. 640KRAM. MS DOS 3.2 
Operating System. Optional 8087 Maths Co-Processor Socket. Detachable XT Style Keyboard. Includes Parallel & RS232 Serial Ports. 256K Screen RAM . Supplied with Mouse Mono Screen 

Resolution of 720'350. Colour Screen Res. 640"350. Palette of 64 Colours. 1 6 can be displayed at the same time. Works with any CGA. MDA.EGA or Multi Frequency Monitor. Comes with 

FREE Software & FREE Manual. R.R.P = £647.49. Our price is only £580.00 inclusive! Atari PC3 as above + EGA Mono Monitor R.R.P= £747.49. Our price is only £670.00 inclusive!!! Atari 

PC3 + EGA Mono Monitor + 30 MB Hard Disk R.R.P = £10.92.49. Our price is only £819.99 + VAT!!! All prices are inclusive of VAT & Delivery unless otherwise stated. . 

Prices inclusive of VAT & deliver unless otherwise stated. These are only some examples, for more information call : COMPUSHOP 1 ON : 01-738-8400 

If you do not see it. It does not mean we do not have it. Please call us and you will not regret it 

Prices are always fluctuating up or down. Call for the latest information and for availability. Mail Order Only. Speedy Delivery. No Hidden Extras. 

STOP PRESS. Look 3 1/2" Disc(DSDD): 10 for £11.00. 20 for £21.00. 40 for £40.00, and 50 for £47.50. For the best prices for all Atari-Amiga Hardware (Computers, Peripherals and 

Accessories call :Compushop 1 at 01-736.8400. (Make Chqs'P.O.s payable to Apolonia Software and send to:a 

rApolonia Software. DPT STAM 11, South Bank Business Centre, Unit 25(M). Thames House. 140 Battersea Park Road. London. SW11 4NB. 



APOLONIA SOFTWARE -THE COMPANY THAT CARES 




REVIEW 

SUPER HANG-ON 



ELECTRIC DREAMS/MEDIAGENIC 



Atari ST - £19.99, joystick, mouse 



Amiga — due January '89 



It's quite a change to do a spot 
of road running without a huge 
arsenal of weapons on the end of 
the fire button - overtaking the 
guy in front is an awful lot harder if 
you can't blast him off the track. 
Super Hang-On compensates by 
putting a nitro charger at your fin- 
ger tips. If you're doing over 
200km/hr, you can cut in the 
charger, bump up the speedo to 
around 325 and hold on for dear 
life as you burn off everything in 
sight. Whether you'll make it 
around the next bend is a different 
question entirely, but thankfully 
there are 48 stages of difficulty 
coded down to a tee. If two- 
wheeled terror is your kind of kick 
then this should be on your list. 
It's more exciting than OutrunlF, 
but is that really saying anything? 
Super Hang-On is a race 



against time set on four conti- 
nents, each featuring colourful 
backdrops of deserts, fields and 
cities. Finish a stage in the allot- 
ted time and its onto the next 
stretch of speedway. You won't 
have much time to admire the 
scenery though as there are 
rocks, trees and lamp post fes- 
tooning the roadside and a bunch 
of other leathered loonies to drive 
you nuts. Indeed, collisions with 
other bikes are the fastest way to 
get a face full of gravel so your 
reactions are more likely to be 
concerned with their cornering 
abilities than your own. You'll need 
to keep pumping that nitro though 
as some of those stages are very 
tight on time. Mouse control is 
more responsive than joystick for 
those moments that really matter. 
Animation is fast and solid 




and collisions depicted by the kind 
of acrobatics that would leave you 
racing in a wheelchair {Bath 
chair? - Ed) for the rest of your 
days. There's a choice of four 
accompanying sound tracks which 
are best consigned to the 
background forever by hitting 
space. 

Super Hang-On is a great 
conversion of the Sega classic 
and proves yet again that the gap 
between coin-op and 16-bit is nar- 
rowing all the time. 



■ Pull back the throttle for a 200 
m.p.h. charge across four conti- 
nents. 



still graphics 3.5 
moving graphics 4.0 



soundtrack 2.0 



lasting interest 3.5 



overall 65% 



NETHERWORLD 



HEWSON 



Amiga — £19.95. Joystick, reviewed. 



ST - £19.95. Joystick, also available. 



The programmer of this lit- 
tle number delights in the 
name Jukka Tapanimaki. Great 
name Jukka, great game too. 

So you're in another time, 
another dimension locked in the 
eternal fight between good and 
evil, facing hideous 'death-exuding' 
aliens of every imaginable descrip- 
tion etc etc. This time the evil 
takes the form of acid bubbles, 



AMIGA v ST 

The Amiga version of 
Netherworld is significantly 
better than on the ST. The 
gameplay is the same, but 
scrolling is faster and 
smoother, the sound is more 
varied, and some clever pro- 
gramming allows more 
colours to be used on screen. 
Overall, we'd only rate the ST 
version at 60%. 



demon dragons, goat's heads and 
various mines, as you guide your 
ship through level after level of 
mayhem in a search for dia- 
monds. You're up against the 
clock and searching for a teleport 
to the next dimension (sounds like 
working for Format - Ed) as you 
pump a million tons of lead into 
dragons' heads. Such noble 
restraint will give you extra lives, 
extra points, mystery bonuses 
and special features like inverting 
all control movements. 

The graphics and sound dis- 
play their 8-bit lo-res design ori- 
gins, but scrolling is obviously 
improved. Certain 'trigger' icons 
flash you across three screens' 
worth at something approaching 
light speed when you run into 
them. 

Possibly Hewson's strongest 
16-bit release in terms of sheer 
blastability, Netherworld really 
shifts in the firepower department 




■ You carefully ponder how to get at those gems while gently blasting 
the living daylights out of this poor beast 



despite a rather standard sce- 
nario. A good outing for Hewson 
on the 16-bit format - now when 




J A quick salvo of pure laser 
power is all this guy understands! 



are they going to get beyond 8-bit 
conversions? 



still graphics 2.5 



soundtrack 2-5 



overall 64% 



64 ■ FORMAT 




H0ME&BW5INE55 C0AAPMTER5 

HARDWARE 

Atari STFM Super Pack 1 Meg Internal Drive 

& 21 Games + ST Organiser, Joystick, Mouse 349.00 

Amiga A500 + 5 Games, Modulator, Deluxe 

Paint 399.00 

Amiga A500 as above with The Works 
(Scribble -Word process or, Organize-Database, 

Analyze-Spreadsheet) 459.00 

Citizen120D Printer with lead ST/Amiga 139.00 

1 Megabyte Drives ST/Amiga enable/disable 99.00 

Memorex DS/DD per 10 19.00 

Amiga A500 + Commodore 1084 colour monitor 599.00 

Amiga Business Pack (phone for details) 775.00 

Commodore 1084 Colour Hi-Res Monitor including lead for 
ST or Amiga £229.00 



MIDI SOFTWARE AVAILABLE PLEASE PHONE 

AMIGA SOFTWARE 

The Works (Scribble, Organize, Analyse) 69.00 

Studio Magic 65.00 

Deluxe Video 48.50 

Sculpt 3D 59.00 

Turbo Silver 115.00 

Deluxe Video 48.50 

Deluxe Productions £115.00 



48 Bachelor Gardens, Harrogate 
North Yorkshire, HG1 3EE 
Tel: (0423) 526322 
All prices include V.A.T& Postage, Courier Extra 



ALPHA COMPUTING 

DISCOUNT PRICES AND SUPER SERVICE 



A ATARI ST HARDWARE 

520 STFM & Free PD Software ,£275.50 

520 STFM & Joystick & Atari SUPERPACK £349.50 

1040 STFM - 1 Meg RAM & Free Software £447.50 

(/ AMIGA 500 HARDWARE 

Amiga 500 & Delux Paint ) £375.00 

Amiga 500 & 1084 Med Res Colour Monjtor £585.00 

Amiga 500 Business Pack. Monitor & Printer £649.50 

LATEST SOFTWARE 

Kurnas Ksprcad 3 £69.50 

Kuma's Kword 2 ,£33.50 



ACCESS & VISA WELCOME 

FOR FULL PRICE LIST: 

Phone (0422) 66785 OR WRITE TO: 

ALPHA COMPUTING 32 Meadow Drive. Halifax. W.Yorks HX3 5JZ 



• 2 For 1 Guaranteed Disks • 



79 



P DS/DD 
135tpi 



Plus VAT 



3.5" 

minqty 10 

Units of 10 

(91 pine) 



33, 



Plus VAT 



DS/DD 
48tpi 

5.25" 
min qty 25 
Units of 25 

(38p inc) 



All prices + VAT FREE delivery (UK) 

0705 511439 (office) • 0329 282083 (24 hr) 

0705 511646 (Fax) 

Cheques/P.O to: 



Athene Consultants • Media Centre 
Dept STAM 16 Stoke Road, Gosport, Hants. P012 1JB 



BYTEBACK 




^£ 



KEENEST PRICES 




DELIVERY SERVICE 

We're programmed to help, so ring us now. 



f 


ATARI S 


>T 


AMIG 


A " 


"I 




HARDWARE 


ONLY! 


■ hardware 


ONLY! 




ATARI 520 STFM SUPER PACK 


359.00 A500 Comoutpr 


369 95 


















NEW TITLES 


ONLY 


H newt|tle s 


ONLY! 




Federation of Free Traders 


19.95 Federation of Free Traders 


19.95 




Bile 


16.95 Elite (Nov) 


13 95 


Chrono Quest 


19.95 Fusion 


16.95 


Gary Lineker Super Skills 


15.95 Pioneer Plague 


13.95 


Sorcery + 


13.95 Battle Chess 


16.95 


Lancelot 


13.95 B.A.T 


16.95 


Starglider 2 


16.95 Zork Zero 


16.95 


Super Hang on 


13.95 Starglider 2 


16.95 


Skychase 


13.95 Chrono Ouest 


20-95 


Olfshore Warrier 


16.95 Garheld 


16.95 


Mania* 


13.95 Daley Thompson Olympics 


16.95 


Elemental 


13.95 Maniacs 


13.95 


Trip a Tron 


24.95 Virus 


13.95 


Hypefbowl 


6.95 Leaderboard Birdie 


15.95 


Round the World in 80 Days 


13.95 


Menace 


13.95 


Football Director 2 


13.95 Summer Olympiad 


13.95 


Strip Poker 2 Data Disk 


6.95 Major Motion 


13.95 


Ouadralren 


13.95 Universal Military Sim 


16.95 


Night Raider 


13.95 Deluxe Photolab 


52.50 


Alternate Reality 


13.95 Zoom 


13.95 


Powerdrome 


16.95 Skyfoxll 


.. 16.95 


Verminator 


16.95 


Starray 


16 95 


Virus 


13.95 Skychase 


13.95 


Empire 


16.95 Scrabble Deluxr 


13.95 


Leaderboard Birdie 


15 95 Platoon 


16.95 


STOS (Arcade Game creator) 


22.95 Ouadralien 


13.95 






.... 16 95 






16 95 


Bombjack 


13.95 Better Dead Than Alien 


13.95 


Buggy Boy 


13.95 


Bombjack 


16.95 


Chessmaster 2000 


16.95 


Bubble Bobble 


13.95 


Captain Blood 


16.95 


Carrier Command 


16 95 


Carrier Command 


16.95 Capone 


16.95 


Dungeon Master 


16.95 Chessmaster 2000 


1795 


Empire Strikes Back 


13.95 


Black Lamp 


13.95 


Flight Simulator II 


34.9J 


Crystal Hammer 


13 95 


' Western Europe Scenery 


13.95 


Emerald Mines 


13.95 


" Japan Scenery disc 


13.95 


Empire 


16.95 


" Scenery 7 or II 


16.95 


Ferrari Formula One 


16.95 


Garfield 


13.95 


Flight Simulator 2 


32.50 


Gauntlet II 


16.95 


' Scenery disk 7 or 1 1 


16.95 


Gunship 


16.95 


' Western Europe scenery 


13.95 


Hunt For Red October 


16.95 


' Japan Scenery disk 


13.95 


JET (F16 Falcon) 


2995 


Formula 1 Grand Prix 


13.95 


Mickey Mouse 


16.95 


Fortress Underground 


10 45 


Outrun 


16.95 


Interceptor 


17.95 


Revenge of Doh 


13.95 


Powerplay 


13.95 


Scrabble Deluxe 


13.95 


Phalanx 2 


10 45 


Space Harrier 


13.95 


Sentinel 


13.95 


Street Fighter 


16.95 


Star Fleet 1 


17.50 


Star Fleet 1 


16.95 


Seven Cities ol Gold 


11 50 


Star Wars 


13.95 


Star Wars 


16.95 


Strip Poker II Plus 


9.95 


Strike Force Harrier 


1695 


Summer Olympiad ,.. 


13.95 


Thexder 


16.95 


Super Ski 


13.95 


Thundercats 


16.95 


Test Drive 


16.95 


Three Stooqes 


20.95 


Wargame Construction 


19.95 


Whirligig 


13 95 


Whirligig 


13.95 


World Tour Golf 


16.95 


Xenon 


13.95 




13.95 














■ ADVENTURES ONLY! 


M ADVENTURES 


ONLY! 




Bards Tale 


16.95 




1695 




Corruption 


16.95 


Balance ol Power 


20 95 


Shadowgate 


16.95 


Bards Tale 1 or 2 


16.95 


Legend ol the Sword 


16.95 


Defender of Crown 


2095 




16.95 


Corruption 

Deja Vu 


T6 95 


Mindlighter 


16.95 


20.95 




16.95 




20-95 


STAC 


27. 5C 


Mortville Manor 


13.95 


Time and Magic 


13.95 


Romantic Encounters 


16.95 


Uninvited 


16.95 


Shadowgate 


16.95 






ACCESSORIES 


ONLY 


! 


ONLY! 




3.5" Disks SS/DD (x10) 


10.95 


3 5" Disks DS/DD (X10) 


1 1 .95 




Media Box (Hold 150 disks) 


19.95 


Furry Mouse Cover 1 .... 

Keyboard cover 


6.95 


Mouse Mat (Best quality) 


6.95 


595 


Joystick/Mouse extension 


4.95 


Quickshoill 


7.95 


Arcade Joystick 


16.95 


Ouickshot M Turbo 


12.95 



The above is just a small selection of our VAST stock of 16 BIT software! 
Prices include VAT and 1st CLASS POST! Stock items by RETURN OF POST! 



ni#TCD Jkf^MmT ^ STAM 6 MUMBY CLOSE 
DT I CDAIv A NEWARK, NOTTS NG24 1JE 



PAY BY CHEQUE, 
POSTAL ORDER OR USE 
YOUR CREDIT CARD 

►36-79097 




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SERVICE 




AMIGA/ST Mail Order Specialist 



LEISURE 

Aiiarjih! ' 

AJicn Syndrome 

Arkanokl 2 

Barbarian |i';»l;uv) 

Barbann II ■ 

Her Dead Than Alien 
•voncl The Ice Palace 

Bior 



ST AMIGA 



tandos 



Black Tmrr.. 

Bomb Jack 

Bujy^v Boy 

Caponc 

Captain Bl(:;:' 

Chubby Gristle ...... 

Crash Ganvti 

DeBolaior 

■si rover 

Dungeon Master 

Eagles Nest 

KCO 

tninator 

Empire Strikes Back . 
"ire & Forget 

Football Manager n .. 

Fusion 

Came Over II 

GarflekJ 

Garrison I or n 

Gaunlk-t I nrll 

Great C: 

Hard Ball 

Hostages 

Ikari Warriors 

Kalakis 

Leatherneck .. 

Pete Beardslev Soc 

Maeh III 

Major Motion 

Mars Cops 

Masters ol U 

Mean 18 

MENACE 

Mickey Mouse .. 

Night Haider 

Obltteraior 

OIDS 

Outrun 

Overlander 

Pandora 

Platoon 

P.O.W 

POWERDROME 

QuadraUen 

Road Blasters ... 
Rocket Ranger .. 
Rolling Thunder 

Shackled 

Sidearms 



13.50 . 

13.50 . 

13.50 

10.50 . 

10.50. 

13.50 . 

13.50 . 

18.90. 
■ 1 5.50 
. 13.50 .. 
. 13.50 .. 

.' 16,50. 

. 13.50 . 
. 13.50. 
* 1 5.50 . 

.' 16.50. 

. 13.50 . 
. 16.50 . 
'15.50 
. 13.50. 
•16.50. 
. 13.50 

.17,90* 



ITS . 



. . ■ . 



13.25 
16.50 

13.50 

'13.50 
13.50 
16.50 
18 90 

'18.90 
16 50 
16.50 
20.50 

'16.50 
13.50 
16.50 

'18.90 
16.50 

'16.50 
13.00 
16.50 

■ 1 5.50 
13.50 

■16.50 
13.50 
17.90 



13.50 . 


16.50 




18.90 


15.50. 


M8.90 


15.50. 


18.90 




16.50 


16.50. 


• 16.50 


16.50. 


16.50 




■18.90 


13.50 . 


13.50 


13.50 




13.50 


13.50 


13.50. 


13.50 


1350. 


■13.50 


16.50 






. 16.50 


13.50 . 


. 13.50 


15.50 




15.50. 


•15.50 


16.50 . 


- 16.50 


13 50 




15.50 




13.50. 


■ 16.50 


13.50 


. 13.50 


13.50 


. 16.50 




. 20.50 


17.90. 


•17.90 


13.50 


. 16.50 


15.50 


. "8.90 




"20.50 


15.50 


. 18.50 


15.50 




15.50 


. 18.90 



13.50 
13.50 . 
15.50 . 
3 0.50 
.13.50 
17.90 
13.50 . 
13.50 . 
13.50 . 
13.50 . 
13.50 . 
13.50 . 
15.50 . 
13.50 . 
13.50 

15.50 



LESIURE (Cont) 

Sky Chase 13.50 . 

Skv Fox 

SoiklerofLighi 13.50 

Space Harrier 13.50. 

.ida II 16 5 

Star Ray 

SllrCraisy 

Street Fighter 

Klof*: 

Super Hang-On 

Test Drive 

Telra Quest 

The Sentinel 

Thundercats 

VIRUS 

Where Time Stcxicl Still 

Whirligig 

Wizard Wars 

Wizball 

Xenon 

Zoom 

Zynaps 

ADVENTURE & SIMULARION 
ST 
ARMAGEDDON MAN 

1943 

Bards Tale 1 or 11 

Bermuda Project 

CARRIER COMMAND.... 

Chrono Quest 

Corruption 

ELITE 

Fed. ol Free Traders 

Ferrari Formula 1 

FISH 

Flight Sim. 11 

Scenery 7 or 1 1 

Western Europe 

Japan 

HEROES Ol" The LANCE 

Interceptor 

U-aderboard Birdie 

Legend oT the Sword 

Mind Fighter 

Morlville Manor 

FOOL OF RADIANCE .... 

PowerPlav 

Return to Atlantis 

Scrabble Deluxe 

Shadowgate 

SSI Games 

Star Fleel 

STOS Game Creator 

Tangle Wood 

THREE STOOGES 

Time cV Magic 

Ultima ill or iv 



13.50 
11.00 



16.50 
13 50 
18.50 



. 15.00 . 
. 15.50 
. 17.50 . 
. 16.50 . 
. 16.50 . 
.20.50. 
. 16.50 . 
. 16.50. 
•23.00. 

M6.50. 
. 29.90 . 
. 16.50 . 



18.50 

16.50 
16.50 
16.50 
18.50 
13 50 

13.50 



19.50 
21.00 
13.50 



13.50 
16.90 
20.50 



13 50 
13.50 
13 50 
13.50 
16.50 
13.50 
18.90 
16.50 

13.50 
15 50 

AMIGA 

15 00 

17.50 
16.50 
16.50 

■20.50 
16.50 

'16.50 

18.00 
'16.50 
29 90 
16.50 
16.50 
16.50 
"18.50 
17.90 
18.90 
16.50 
16.50 
16.50 
"18.50 
13.50 
17,50 
13.50 
16.50 
Phone 
19.50 

13.50 
18.50 
13.50 
16.90 
■20.50 



GRAPHICS & MUSIC 
AMIGA 

Animator/ 

Images 75.00 

Yideoscapc 31 > 2.0 
(PAL) (1 MB) 107.50 
Aniniaior 

Apprentice ... 155.00 
Deluxe Paint II 

(PAL) 49.90 

Deluxe Productions 

II MB) 100.00 

Digipami 

(PAL) 44.00 

Dimvjfw3 

(PAL) 125.00 

Digiview 

Adaptor 20.00 

Photon Paint 

(PAL) 49.90 

Sculpt 3D 

(PAL) ...59.00 

Sculpt 3D Animate 

(PAL) (1 MB) 100.00 
TV Show 

(PAL) 65.00 

TV Text 

(PAL) 65.00 

Aegis Video 

1'iller (PAL) ....89.00 
Aegis 

Audiomasu-r .. 34.00 
Aegis Son L\ ...45.00 
Deluxe Music 49.90 

QUALITY JOYSTICKS 

Cheetah Mach 

1 * 12.90 

Competition EYo. 

5000 12.90 

Cnmptelilion lYo 
Extra (clear) .. 14.90 

Light Gun 45.00 

HARDWARE 
U.K. ONLY 

AMGIA A500 plus 
Deluxe 

Paint 379.00 

AMIGA A500 + 
Modulator ...399.00 
External 3.5 1 1 
Meg Drive.... 1 10.00 



ATARI ST BOOKS 



_E 



ABACUS 

ST For Beginners £1 1 .95 

Basic Training Guide IJ2.95 

Tricks and Tips £13.95 

Graphics and Sound £13.95 

GEM Reference Guide £14.95 

ST Machine Language £13.95 

Alari ST Internals £14.95 

Midi Programming £13.95 

3D Graphics Programming £15.95 

ST Disk Drives £15.95 

Basic toC £13.95 

OTHER ST BOOKS 

Concise 68000 Prog. Ref £16.95 

Using ST Basic (new ed.) £7.95 

Mastering Sound & Music £14.95 

Alari ST Explored £8.95 

Basic Source Book (rev B) £1 1.95 

1001 Things To Do Wiih ST £10.00 

Graphics & Sound (Tabs) £ 1 1 .40 

ST& AMIGA BOOKS 

First Sieps in 68000 £9.95 

68000 Poekcibook £1.95 

MC 68000 Prog. Ret". Manual £8.95 

Learning C: Prog Graphics £16.95 



COMPUTE! 



Firsi Book of Alari ST 

ST Programmers Guide 

Sound and Graphics 

Kids & The Atari ST 

ST Applications 


...£12.95 
...£14.95 
...£11.95 
...£12.95 

£14 95 


More ST Applications 


£ 1 4 95 


Tech Ref. Guide Vol 1 


...£16.95 


Tech Ref. Guide Vol 2 

ST Anisi 


...£16.95 
...£14.95 


Appl. Guide: Prog, in C 

Elemeniarv Atari ST 


...£16.95 

.. H4Q5 


GFA BASIC PRODUCTS 

GFA Basic V 2.0 £32.50 

GFA Basic Compiler £32.50 

GFA Vector £27.Sfl 


GFA Basic V 3.0 


....£49.95 


GFA Companion 

GFA Artist 


....£23.95 
....£39.95 


GFA Draft 


....£69.95 


Advanced GFA Basic Book 

Advanced GFA Basic Disk 


....£14.95 
£4.95 


GFA Basic Quick Ref. Guide ... 
GFA Training Rceboot Camp .. 

Program in GFA Basic 

GFA Draft Plus 


£8.95 

....£12.95 
....£12.50 
....£99.95 



AMIGA BOOKS 



Amiga for Beginners 


£ 10.95 


Amiga Basic Inside & Out 

Amiga Tricks & Tips 


....£16.95 

....£14.95 


Amiga Machine Language 


£12.95 


Kickstari Guide 


£11.95 


Inside Amiga Graphics 


....£14.95 


Amiea DOS Manual 


£22.95 


Amiga DOS Ref. Guide 


....£14.95 


Amiea Applications 


£14.95 


ROM Kernal Ref Man. Exec ... 


....£22.95 


Amiga Hardware Ref. Man. ... 


£22.95 


Amiga Intuition Ref. Man 


....£22.95 



■ New Titles Available on Re 



Add tl per book overseas or 25 f /c for airmail outside Europe. 



"S; TEL: (0603) 812416 



RETURN OF POST SERVICE ON STOCK ITEMS 



Send S AE for descriptive book catalogue (state ST or Amiga) 

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WORLDWIDE 

SOFTWARE 

1 Bridge Street 

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S O F T WA R E 



WORLDWIDE 

SOFTWARE 

49 Stoney Street 

Nottingham NG1 1LX 



Commodore Amiga Software 

19 Boot Camp £13.25 

1943 Battle Of Midway £17.95 

4 x 4 Ofl Road Racing £17.95 

A.T.F £16.45 

Action Service £13.25 

Adv Dungeon Dragons (ea) £17.95 

Afterburner £16.45 

Alien Syndrome £13.25 

Barbarian II £13.25 

Bards Tale II £18.95 

Better Dead Than Alien £16.45 

Bomb Jack £16.45 

Bubble Bobble £13.25 

Buggy Boy £16.45 

Butcher Hill £14.35 

California Games £17.95 

Carrier Command £16.45 

Chrono Quest £21.95 

Combat School £16.45 

Corruption £16.45 

Daley Thompson Oly Chall £16 45 

Double Dragon £16.45 

Driller £16.45 

Dungeon Master £16.45 

Echelon £17.95 

Empire Strikes Back £13.25 

Enlightenment (Druid II) C13.25 

Espionage £13.25 

F.O.F.T £24.95 

Fernandez Must Die £16.45 

Flight Simulator II £28.95 

Football Manager II £13.25 

Fusion £16.45 

Future Tank £11.99 

Garfield £16.45 

Gary Lmekers Hot Shot £14 35 

Gnome II £13.25 

Gnome Ranges £11.20 

Green Beret £16.45 

Gryzor £16.45 

Helter Skelter £11.20 

Highway Hawks £13.25 

Ikan Warriors £16.45 

Impossible Mission II £17.95 

Interceptor £18.95 

International Soccer £13.25 

Jet £28.95 

Lancelot £13.25 

Leaderboard Collec Birdie £17.95 



Atari ST Software 

1 943 Battle Of Midway £14.35 

Action Service £13.25 

Adv Dungeons & Dragons (each) £ 1 7.95 

Alien Syndrome £13.25 

A.T.F £13.25 

Artura £14 35 

Barbarian II £11.20 

Better Dead Than Alien £13.25 

Bionic Commando £14.35 

Black Tiger £14.35 

Blazing Barrels £13.25 

Bomb Jack £13.25 

Bubble Bobble £13.25 

Butcher Hill £14.35 

Calitorma Games £14.35 

Captain Blood £16.45 

Carrier Command £16.45 

Chrono Quest £21.95 

Corruption £16.45 

Cybernoid £14.35 



Atari ST Software 

Gariield £13.25 

Gunship £16.45 

Helter Skelter £11.20 

Hollywood Poker (Adults only) £7.25 

Hotshot £13.25 

International Karate ♦ £13 25 

International Soccer £13.25 

Jet £28.95 

Kennedy Approach.. , £16.45 

Kiltdozers £13.25 

Leaderboard Collection Birdie £14.35 

Leatherneck £13.25 

Legend Of The Sword £16.45 

Leisuresuit LarryiAdulls Only) £13.25 

Live And Let Die £16.45 

Luxor £11.20 

Maldet £11.20 

Maupiti Island £13.25 

Mickey Mouse £14.35 

Mmdfighter £16.45 



Atari ST Software 

R-Type £16.45 

Return To Genesis £14.35 

Revenge II £7.25 

Road Blasters £14.35 

Rocklord £13.25 

Rolling Thunder £14.35 

S.T.Q.S £22.95 

Shadowgate £ 16.45 

Silent Service £16.45 

Sinbad Throne Of Falcons £21.95 

Skychase C13.25 

Space Harner C13.25 

S.D.I £21.95 

ST Adv Creator £26.55 

ST Five Star £16.45 

Star Wars £13.25 

Starfleet £18.95 

Siarglider II £16.45 

StarRay £13.25 

Strike Force Harrier £16.45 



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& Overseas 
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Atari ST Software 

Daley Thompson Olympic Chall. ..£13.25 

De Luxe Scrabble £13.25 

Double Dragon £16.45 

Dungeon Master £16.45 

Eliminator £14 35 

Elite £16.45 

Espionage ... £13.25 

F.O.F.T £24.95 

Fernandez Must Die £16.45 

Fish £16.45 

Flight Simulator II £28.95 

Football Director II £13 25 

Football Manager II £13.25 

Fusion £16.45 

Galdregons Domain £1 4.35 

Game Over II £15.99 

Games Winter Edition £17.95 

Gary Lineker Supersklls £14.35 

Gary Lmekers Hot Shot. ... £14.35 

Gauntlet II £14 35 



Atari ST Software 

Manhattan Dealers £13. 25 

Morlville Manor £16 45 

Motor Bike Madness £11 .20 

Motor Massacre £14.35 

Navcom 6 .C16.45 

N:gel Mansell Grand Prix ..£15.95 

Night Rider £14.35 

Offshore Wamor £13.25 

Olds £13.25 

Oops! £13.25 

Operation Wolf £13.25 

Cutrun £14.35 

Overlander £13.25 

Pacmania £13 25 

Peter Beardsley Football £13.25 

Piatuon £13.25 

Powerdrorne £18.95 

Ouadralien £13.25 

Ouanlum Paint £14.95 

Rally Run £13.25 



Atari ST Software 

Star Goose £13.25 

StarRay £13.25 

Summer Olympic £13.25 



Super Hang On 

Techno Cop 

Terrorpods 

Time And Maqik 

Ultima V 

Ultimate Golf 

Universal Military Simulator. 

Vermmator 

Veteran 

Virus 

Vroom 

Wanderer 



...£12.50 
...£14.35 
..£15.95 
. £13,25 
...C16.45 
...C14.35 
..£16.45 
...£16.45 
...£11.20 
...£13.25 
...£13.25 
..£16.45 



Wargame Const Set £17 95 

West Europe Scenery Disk £15.99 

Where Time Stood SMI £13.25 

Sorcery Plus £13.25 

Zynaps £14.35 



Commodore Amiga Software 

Legend Of The Sword £16 45 

Leis Suit Larry (Adultsonlyj £13.25 

Live And Let Die £16 45 

Luxor £11.20 

Mafdet £11 20 

Manhattan Dealers £ 16.45 

Maniax £13 25 

Mickey Mouse £14 35 

Morlville Manor £16.45 

Motor Bike Madness C 11.20 

Motor Massacre £14.35 

Navcom 6 £16.45 

Nebulus £17.95 

Night Raider £14.95 

Offshore Warrior £16.45 

Outrun £16.45 

Overlander £16 45 

Pacmania £13.25 

Peter Beardsley Football £13.25 

Phantasie III £17.95 

Platoon £16.45 

Powderdrome £17.95 

Rally Run £13.25 

Road Blasters £17.95 

Robbery 03.25 

Rocket Ranger £21.95 

Rolling Thunder £17.95 

Sex Vixens From Outer Space £16.45 

Shadowgate £16.45 

Shoot Em Up Const Kit C17.95 

Skychase £13.25 

Space Hamer ...£16.45 

Starghder II £16.45 

Stargoose £13.25 

StarRay £16.45 

Summer Olympiad £13.25 

Techno Cop £14.35 

Tetra Quest £13.25 

Time And Magik £13.25 

Ultima V C21.95 

Ultimate Golf £14.35 

Universal Military Simulator £16.45 

Vermmator.. £16.45 

Virus £13.25 

Wanderer C16.45 

World Tour Golf £16.95 

Zynaps £14.35 

10x3.5 'DS/DDHi Oual.Disk £9.95 




DISK 



DISK 
EXTRA 



ST Amiga Format's unique dual format disk gives you the 
best of both ST and Amiga worlds! Get stuck into this 
month's bonanza, including complete playable versions 
of the classic Space Invaders or Pac Man for your 

machine. 



r SP^OK^ 



IIIITf IIISIEIS 



74 SPOOKS 

Oh, the nostalgia. The memories 
of a misspent youth come flood- 
ing back when you try your hand 
at this version of Pac Man. 




75 LIGHT 
FANTASIA 

Sit back, load up your Woodstock 
double album and get high on 
this psychedelic light show. This 
is really heavy stuff, man! Flared 
trousers and Afghan jacket not 
supplied. 

77 ST SWITCH 

Run two programs simultaneously 
with ST Switch. It's not multitask- 
ing, but it can still speed up your 
work rate considerably. 

77 ETERNAL 
RAMDISK 
Most RAM disks die instantly 
when your ST crashes or is 
reset. Not Eternal, the ST recov- 
erable RAM disk that just won't 
die. 

77 B BOOT 

By popular demand, we present 
B BOOT, written by your very own 
technical editor, the ridiculously 
renowned Richard Monteiro. You 



can now boot from drive B with- 
out having to perform open heart 
surgery on your ST. 

77 DUNGEON 

MASTER CHEAT 
Yes, we know this one didn't 
make it onto last month's disk, 
that's why ifs on this one. Now 
you can design your own dun- 
geons with the ultimate dungeon 
master cheat program. 

77 DESK_PIC 

Enhance the look of your screen 
display with this ingenious little 
program. DESK„PIC loads a 32K 
picture into the backdrop screen 
of the ST's desktop. 



AMIGA 




74 AMOEBA 
INVADERS 

Enjoy the frantic atmosphere of 
that all-time arcade classic, 
Space Invaders. Save the Earth 
(again!) from the ever advancing 
alien hordes. 

75 ICON MAKER 

Fed up with the Workbench Icon 
Editor? Create icons of any size 
from standard IFF format brush 
files with Icon Maker. 
79 MIDI UTILITY 

Whether you're a budding 
Beethoven or a' future Vince 
Clarke, MIDI Utility will help you 
with your musical masterpieces - 
particularly with our DIY MIDI 
interface kit in this issue. 



79 DX VOICE FILER 

If you're the proud owner of a 
Yamaha DX series synthesiser 
and an Amiga MIDI interface (0K F 
we won't plug our kit again) then 
DX Voice Filer is for you. Throw 
away the tape recorder and store 
your voice files on disk. 




79GOMF l.O 

Stop your machine from going 
out to lunch with the Guru. GOMF 
is a program destined to become 
the Amiga user's guardian angel. 

75 NEMESIS DEMO 
Brighten up your screen with this 
neat graphics and music demo. It 
shows just how good simple 
effects can be. 

79 CHEATS 

Get the better of ikari Warriors 
and Beyond the ice Paiace with 
these nifty little pokes. 




AMIGA MIDI 
SPECIAL! 

So you've finally got your 
Amiga MIDI interface, your 
synthesiser and a lot of musi- 
cal ideas just waiting to be 
unleashed. All that is now 
required to get you up and 
running is some software, am 
as it 'appens guv, this month' 1 
cover disk has just the pro- 
grams. Just think, the road to 
international stardom, all night 
parties and constant hounding 
by groupies is finally within 
your grasp. 





WE'RE PAYING 

£800! 

FOR GOOD SOFTWARE 
ON OUR COVER DISK 

We're looking for good quality software to fill our cover disk each 
month. If you're a nifty programmer you could earn big bucks 
from your labours - games, business applications, utilities, or any- 
thing of general interest. 

Turn to the end of this section for more details on how to get 
your software onto the Format cover disk. 



FORMAT m 67 




« 



THOSE WERE 
THE DAYS! 

Contrary to popular belief, 
Space Invaders and Pac Man 
weren't the games that 
launched the arcade craze in 
the UK. The game that started 
it all was in fact Pong written 
by a certain Nolan Bushnell, 
founder of Atari, back in 72. 
The game didn't appear in the 
UK until the following year but 
it laid the foundations for 
today's prosperous arcade 
industry. Space Invaders 
arrived on the scene in 1 978 
and instantly spawned immita- 
tors due to the fact that the 
creators, Taito, failed to issue 
any copyright on the game. 
Pac Man arrived two years 
later and has since caused 
many legal wrangles over 
copyright infringement, includ- 
ing the first major bust up 
between Atari and Commo- 
dore over Jeliy Monsters on 
the VIC-20. 





First, copy and load the 
disk as described at the 
end of the Disk Extra sec- 
tion. 

SPOOKS 

Public Domain 
All Colour STs 
FILENAMES: SPOOKS.PRG, 
PACMAN.DOC 

Do you remember the excitement that 
surrounded the industry a few years 
back? The arcades were full of games 
like Space Invaders, Asteroids and 
Pac Man. Although the graphics and 




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■ Spooks (ST) - the game that gives a whole new meaning to the phrase 
'Pacced Lunch'. Pac Man lives again. 



sound produced by those early 
machines weren't a patch on what the 
ST and Amiga can now produce, the 
sheer addictiveness of the gameplay 
kept gamesters coming back for 
more. Of all those early games, 
Space Invaders and Pac Man proved 
to be the most popular among game- 
players. We gave you Space 
Invaders with Issue 1, and now you 
can complete your collection with 
Spooks, a Pac Man clone. 



You can load Spooks either from 
our cover disk menu program, 
CLICK_ME, or by clicking on the 
game's icon on the Desktop. You 
need a joystick in control port two to 
play. Spooks tends to play havoc with 
the ST's internals and it is therefore 
advised that you turn off your ST after 
playing Spooks before attempting to 
use any other programs. Full playing 
instructions are included in the 
Spooks folder. 



AMIGA 



First, copy and load the 
disk as described at the 
end of the Disk Extra sec- 
tion. These programs run 
on all three Amiga models. 
We have been unable to 
test them on the early ver- 
sion of the Amiga 1000. 



AMEOBA 
INVADERS 

Public Domain 
All Amigas 
FILENAMES: 

Ameobajnvaders, 
Ameoba_lnvaders.DOC 

Who hasn't at one time or another 
played Space Invaders? Very few. A 
few years back, Space Invaders was 
THE game to be seen playing. Some 
people would spend hours in front of 
the console blasting away at invading 
sprites and pumping 10 pence pieces 



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■ Amoeba 
Invaders 
(Amiga). 
Its so good 
you'll even 
believe 
there are 
good oY 
red, blue 
and green 
plastic 
strips 
across 
your 

screen, in 
true arcade 
style. 



68 ■ FORMAT 




into the coin slots. Even in the days of 
more sophisticated arcade machines 
like Afterburner and Space Harrier, 
Space Invaders still continues to 
entertain the most hardened of 
arcade junkies. You too can experi- 
ence the arcade classic with 
Ameoba Invaders. 

The workings of Space Invaders 
must surely be known to almost 
everyone, but if you genuinely haven't 
ever played Space Invaders (Where 
have you been!) then sit yourself down 
and we'll begin. You are the sole 
guardian of a peace loving planet that 
has for many years resisted the 
aggressive alien race that is hell bent 
on adding your sweet little planet to 
its list of alien tourist attractions. Not 
content with a short, sharp 'No, Go 
away' as an answer, the aliens take it 
on themselves to capture your home 
planet by force. With your mobile 
laser turret, you are the final obstacle 
in their path. Fight hard, Space 
Adventurer, or your planet will be sub- 
jected to a hideous fate... intergalac- 
tic tourists and alien soap operas. 

You can load Ameoba Invaders by 
clicking on its icon on the Workbench 
or by inserting the cover disk at the 
Insert Workbench' screen. Full 
instructions are included in the 
Ameoba Invaders drawer. 



LIGHT FANTASIA 

by N. Antonson 
All Colour STs 
FILENAMES: 
FANTASIA.PRG, FANTA- 
SIA.DOC 

Light Fantasia is an interactive light 
synthesiser similar to those made 
famous by the llama man, Jeff Minter. 
While not as sophisticated as Jeff's 
masterpiece Trip-a-Tron, Light 
Fantasia will provide an insight into the 
world of light synthesis. 

When left to its own devices, 
Fantasia runs through a preset light 
show. If you're feeling in the mood, 
though, and are geared up mentally 
then it's time to take over the action 
and create your own kaleidoscope of 
spectacular, swirling colour 

Playing the keyboard of your ST 
can produce the final death throes of 
an exploding galaxy, the cycling bril- 





■ Light Fantasia in action. Caution - don't run this program if you're in an illegal 
state of mind' 



liance of the fountain of light or the 
hypnotic power of flying light [Is this 
hype or what? - Edl. 

Experience Light Fantasia by 
selecting it from the CLICK_ME menu 
or by clicking on its icon on the 
Desktop. After a few seconds 
Fantasia loads and displays a title 
screen. Press the space bar and the 
main program is loaded into memory. 



The graphic elements employed in 
Fantasia are complex and require a 
fair amount of setting up. This is car- 
ried out automatically when the pro- 
gram first loads, but you'll just have to 
sit back and wait a couple of minutes 
while it happens. 

Full instructions and a list of alt 
Light Fantasia's controls are available 
within the Fantasia folder. 



ICON MAKER 

By Richard Biswas 
All Amigas 

FILENAMES: IconMaker, 
lconMaker.DOC 

Icons on the Amiga have always been 
the source of much confusion. Only a 
select few have mastered the art of 
making icons do exactly what is 
required. With Icon Maker, though, the 
process of constructing icons sudden- 
ly becomes a whole lot easier. 

Icon Maker lets you construct 
icons of any size from standard IFF 
format brush files as produced by 
programs such as Deluxe Paint and 
Aegis images. In fact, any paint pack- 
age that produces IFF format pictures 
should provide for the saving of 
brushes. If you don't own an Amiga 
paint package, the Fish public domain 
disks are as always a good source of 
IFF pictures. 

Not content with converting IFF 
brush files to icons, icon maker lets 
you reverse the process, converting 
icons to IFF brush files. With a little 
imagination and artistic flair, your 
Workbench can take on a whole new 
appearance. 

Icon Maker is a fairly 'techie' pro- 
gram, but is designed to be as simple 
as possible to use. Just a point and a 
click is all thafs required. Full instruc- 
tions, including a comprehensive tuto- 
rial, are included in the Icon Maker 
drawer. This file is definitely recom- 
mended reading if you want to get the 
most from Icon Maker. 



You can load Icon Maker either 
from our cover disk menu program 
Click_Me, or by clicking on its icon on 
the Workbench. If Icon Maker fails to 
work, check that you have the file 
ICON.LIBRARY in the UBS directory of 



the disk with which you start your 
Amiga. All Workbench disks have this 
file as standard so it is best to boot 
your Amiga with Workbench before 
using Icon Maker. 



IESIS 

Public Domain 
All Amigas 
FILENAME: Nemesis 




gram, and works in low resolution 
mode. Apart from being a most 
relaxing cosmic experience as you 
swoop round planets and through 
asteriod belts on a journey through 


This is a neat little demo subm 
by American Mark Riley to 


tted 
last 


the solar system, it is a fine exam- 
ple if how effective simple effects 


year's 'Badge Killer' contest 
competition to find the best Ar 


- a 
niga 


can be. Watch how colour cycling, 
shadows and single pixels of light 


graphics and sound demonstra 


tion. 


are used to create your very own 


It takes up a mere 60K on c 


risk, 


planetarium, then write your own 


which is peanuts for a graphics 


pro- 


demo and send it in to us! 



H 



DISK 




LEGALLY 
SPEAKING... 

Pac Man is a trademark of 
Atari Corp., and strictly speak- 
ing refers to the original pukka 
coin-op game and licensed 
conversions. Whenever we 
use the phrase 'Pac Man' is 
this article, we are referring to 
the general style of the game. 




■ Icon Maker 
lets you con- 
vert designs 
created in art 
packages into 
clickable 
icons for your 
programs. 




PJ1 



FORMAT ■ 69 




H 



DISK 



GIVING IT AWAY 

Any program from our disk list- 
ed as 'Public Domain' can be 
freely copied, through your 
user club, bulletin board or 
whatever. Other programs - 
the ones credited to specific 
authors - are copyright to 
those people. They are not PD. 
If you want to sell copies of 
those programs, Format can 
put you in touch with the 
authors. 




ST SWITCH 

Public Domain 
All STs 
FILENAMES: 

SWITCHERPRG, SWITCH- 
ER.DOC 

As every Amiga owner will tell you, 
being able to run more than one pro- 
gram at once can be a real time 
saver. While the Amiga offers true 
multi-tasking, the ST's operating sys- 
tem is of a more conventional nature. 
Although no where near as sophisti- 




■ Desk Pic (ST) can drop a picture of your choice behind your GEM 
desktop screen. 




cated as true multi-tasking, it is possi- 
ble to mimic multi-tasking, using the 
ST's machine-code interrupts. 

ST Switch lets you run two pro- 
grams simultaneously by partitioning 
the ST's memory into two indepen- 
dent halves. These two sections of 
memory both act as a normal ST 
RAM environment and you can there- 
fore run two programs at the same 
time, memory-size permitting. For 
example, you could have a word pro- 



cessor running in one half and the 
ST's Desktop in the other. By simply 
swapping partitions, you can have full 
access to the Desktop without ever 
having to leave your w/p, a real time 
saver. 

Sounds great doesn't it! Well, 
there is a snag. ST Switch is not the 
most reliable of programs and can 
sometimes crash when memory gets 
short. The rule with this one is 'Don't 
trust any valuable data to ST Switch'. 
Always remember, if you have twice 
as many programs running, you could 
lose twice as much data when the 
machine goes down. 

ST Switch won't run from our 
menu program {although our menu 
program will run from ST Switch!) as 
it requires a certain amount of setting 
up. First, copy the file SWiTCHBT.PRG 
into your work disk's AUTO folder. 
Now reset your ST and SWITCHBT will 
be executed. SWITCHBT is very polite 
and asks you whether you want to 
split RAM; type Y or N and press 
RETURN. If you enter Y, your ST will 
reset itself and reboot with two parti- 
tions under the control of ST SWITCH. 

To switch between the two, press 
[Ctrl] and both [Shift] keys. ST 
SWITCH works best on 'well behaved' 
programs such as word processors. 
For optimum efficiency, use a mono 
monitor. ST SWITCH was designed as 
a 'fun' program and shouldn't be 
taken too seriously. 

DESK_PIC 

Program: PD 

Picture: Michael Pease 

Colour STs only 

FILENAMES: 

DESK_PIC.EXE, 

DESK_PIC.PRG, 

FORMAT.SAS 

Let's face it, the ST's Desktop can 

get a little monotonous after a while. 

Wouldn't it be nice if you could add a 

little variety to it once in a while? With 

DESK_PIC and a Degas format pic- 



DUNGEON 
MASTER CHEAT 

By Edward Penman 

All STs 

FILENAMES: DMCHEAT.PRG, 

DMCHEAT.DOC 

If you fancy yourself as a bit of a dungeon master, 
with a flair for dungeon architecture, then Edward 
Penman's Dungeon Master cheat should prove a 
great help. Ed's great little program allows you to 
change the layout of the first three levels of 
MirrorSoft's best seller. 

The Dungeon Master cheat lets you completely 
redesign the floor plan of a dungeon, move doors 
around and generally have a good time playing god 
with the inhabitants of the dungeons. 

Load the Dungeon Master cheat program from 
our cover disk menu program, CLICK_ME, or by 



70 ■ FORMAT 



clicking directly on its icon on the desktop. Full 
instructions are included within the dungeon master 



WARNING: the program saves a modified 'save 
game' file with your new designs in it, so if you have 
a part-completed game using the original dungeon 
layout and want to retain your position, save and 
load the cheated file to and from a disk other than 
your Dungeon Master disk. 




ture you can. 

DESK,PIC loads a Degas format 
picture into the backdrop screen of 
the ST's Desktop. We've provided a 
nice picture sent to us with the pro- 
gram to give you an idea of what is 
possible. If you're the owner of a 
paint package that supports the 
Degas file format or if you have any 
Degas pictures then by simply replac- 
ing the file FORMAT.SAS with your 
Degas picture, you can a picture of 
your choice gracing the Desktop. 

You'll find DESKJ>IC.PRG in the 
AUTO folder of this month's cover 
disk. To use DESK_PIC, the program 
and its accompanying file, 
DESK_PIC.EXE, must be copied into 
the AUTO folder of your workdisk and 
your picture file, FORMAT.SAS, must 
be present in the root directory. 

ETERNAL 
RAMDISK 

Public Domain 
All STs 
FILENAMES: 
ETERNAL.PRG, CONF- 
GRAMTOS, ETERNAL.DOC 
RAM drive are wonderful things. They 
operate at a speed that not even a 
hard drive can match, and never need 
a low level format! But if you reset 
your machine or if something causes 
it to crash, you can say goodbye to 
your RAM drive. Until now, that is. 
Eternal is a fine example of a recover- 
able RAM drive, much like those 
already available to Amiga owners. 

Eternal won't run from our cover 
disk menu program, CLICKJVIE, as it 
has to be run at start up. To use it, 
copy the file ETERNAL.PRG into your 
work disk's AUTO folder. Make sure it 
is the first thing you put into the fold- 
er, as Eternal must be the first pro- 
gram executed on start up. Next, 
copy CONFGRAM.TOS into the same 
AUTO folder. To configure the RAM 
disk (set it size etc), run CONFGRAM 
and answer the on screen prompts. 

The next step is to install the 
RAM drive on the Desktop. Click on 
the A: drive icon and select Install 
Disk Drive' from the Options menu. 
Enter the same drive letter you 
entered in CONFGRAM (don't press 
[Return]) and then click on the Install 
gadget. A disk drive icon now 
appears. Select 'Save Desktop' from 
the options menu and the set up is 
complete. Reboot your ST and your 
Eternal RAM drive will appear. 

When your ST crashes or you 
reset it, you must boot with the disk 
that holds the RAM drive program, 
otherwise your Eternal RAM drive will 
be destroyed. For more information 
on copying files and installing disk 
drives, refer to your ST users manual 
and the 'How to use this disk' page at 
the end of this section. Full instruc- 
tions can be found in Eternal's folder. 



B BOOT 

by I. Mitchell and Richard 

Monteiro 

All STs 

FILENAMES: B_BOOT.PRG, 

B_BOOT.DOC 

You may remember that Issue 3's 
Desktop section featured a tip to let 
your ST boot from drive B:. This 
unfortunately involved subjecting your 
ST to surgery with a blunt soldering 
iron - understandably too much for 
most people's stomachs. If you're one 
of those people who just can't face 
the agony of a hardware modification, 
then help is at hand in the form of B 
BOOT 

B BOOT is a software solution to 
the problem. There's no soldering 
involved. In fact, you don't have to 
open your ST, so your machine's war- 
ranty will not be affected. Just run the 
program once and your ST will boot 
from drive B: until you decide enough 
is enough and switch the machine off. 
There must be a catch you're think- 
ing. Not so, just run once and that's 
it. All this in just 131 bytes! 

B BOOT is designed to sit in the 
AUTO folder of a disk. When you boot 
with this disk in drive A, as soon as B 
BOOT has been executed the boot 
process is transferred to drive B. The 
nice thing about B BOOT is that it will 
survive all system crashes and even if 
you reset the machine, B BOOT will 
continue doing its stuff. 

For details on how to copy B 
BOOT, refer to the 'How to use this 
disk' section on page 80 of this 
month's Format. Full program instruc- 
tions can be found in the B_B00T 
folder. 



AMIGA 



MIDI UTILITY 

Public Domain 
All Amigas 

FILENAMES: MIDIUtil, 
MIDIUtil.DOC 

Over the past couple of years the 
computer has become as important 
to the musician as his synthesiser. 
Many top musicians, such as Vince 




■ MIDI Utility (Amiga) doing its stuff 
with our inimitably home made ST 
Amiga Format Amiga MIDI interface. 



Clarke of Erasure who uses a BBC 
micro and the Pet Shop Boys who use 
the now famous Fairlight CMI, rely 
heavily on computers in one form or 
another. With MIDI Utility and a suit- 
able MIDI interface, your Amiga can 
also get in on the act. 

MIDI Utility is a comprehensive 
collection of useful MIDI utilities all 
contained in one program. Using a 
MIDI keyboard and MIDI Utility, you 
can record sequences and have your 
Amiga play them back. If you're lucky 
enough to own a Casio CZ101 synth, 
then MIDI Utility could prove to be a 
great asset. The program allows you 
to upload and download both sound 
patch data and the CZlOl's internal 
voice data to and from the Amiga via 
a MIDI interface. 

To start your journey to interna- 
tional stardom, you can load MIDI 
Utility from both our cover disk menu 
program, Click_Me, and from the 
Workbench. Full instructions can be 
found in the MIDI Utility drawer. 



DX VOICE FILER 

Public Domain 
All Amigas 

FILENAMES: VoiceFiler, 
VoiceFiler.DOC 

The Yamaha DX series of synthesizers 
have probably become the most pop- 
ular keyboards available on the mar- 
ket. The range spans a wide variety 
of synths of varying complexity, from 
the low cost DX100 right up to the 
latest addition to the range, the DX7- 
2S. One of the main selling points of 
the DX synths has been the versatility 
and ease of use of their voice editing 
facilities. Once a voice has been pro- 
duced, it is nice to be able to keep it 
for future use and this is where DX 
Voice filer comes in. 

DX Voice filer lets you download 
your Yamaha voice files through a 
MIDI interface and as it 'appens Guv, 
Format have got this nice little DIY 
MIDI interface on offer this month. 
Turn to page 17 for further details. 

Another useful function offered by 
Voice filer is a random voice genera- 
tor that can be used to produce some 
interesting sounds on your synthesis- 
er. This feature alone makes Voice 
filer instantly useful. 

Due to the number of Synths with- 
in the Yamaha DX range, it would be 
practically impossible to give full 
instructions on how to use Voice Filer 
on the synth end of the MIDI link. For 
full details of setting up your synth to 
transmit voice data, refer to your DX 
owners manual or alternatively, have a 
friendly chat with your local Yamaha 
DX dealer who should be able to help. 

You can load Voice Filer directly 
from the Workbench by clicking on its 
icon or from our cover disk menu pro- 
gram, Click_Me. Full instructions are 
included within the Voice filer drawer. 



CHEATS 

by Peter Featherstone 
All Amigas 
FILENAMES: Cheat, 
Cheat.DOC 

Welcome to this month's underhanded 
gameplaying corner. If you're one of 
the many who are stuck on either 
Ikari Warriors or Beyond the Ice 
Palace from Elite, then Pete's game- 
busting cheat routine is for you. 

The cheat routine cannot be load- 
ed from either the Workbench or our 
cover disk menu program but has to 
be loaded directly from the CLI. Don't 
worry, this isn't too difficult! Firstly, 
boot your Amiga with a standard 
Workbench disk and once loaded, 
enter the system drawer and click on 
the CLI icon. A small CLI window will 
appear. If everything has gone OK so 
far, remove your Workbench disk and 
insert the coverdisk in your internal 
drive (DFO:). Now type 

DFO : GAMEBUSTERS/ CHEAT and 

press [Return]. The cheat program will 
now load. 




DISK 



GOMF!?! 

GOMF's rather strange name is 
an acronym for 'Get Outta My 
Face'. This rather strange 
expression, made famous by 
Tubbs in Miami Vice, is suppos- 
edly what is uttered by 
American programmers when 
their Amigas crash. Strange 
people those Americans! 



GOMF l.O 

Public Domain 

All Amigas 

FILENAMES: Gomfl.O, Errl, Gomf.DOC 

The Amiga's multi-tasking operating system is among the most 
sophisticated available on any micro. Through the use of an 
advanced message passing system controlled by the multi-tasking 
executive, the Amiga was one of the first micros to offer a true 
multi-programming environment. Even so, the Amiga has gained 
itself a reputation for being rather unstable. The infamous 'Guru 
Meditation' has become the Amiga owner's number one wind-up. 

If you've ever experienced a software failure then you'll know 
how frustrating it can be. Hours of work can be lost in seconds 
due to some run-away program that deci ' 
completely trash exec's workspace. If you're a victim or exec tnen 
help is at hand in the . 
form of GOMF. 



GOMF wedges 
tself into the operat- 
ng system and moni- 
tors all goings on. As 
5oon as things start 



I Alwt 

mtxm 

\\Mtrn$ 



IB BEE I 



est possibility of a " Wouldn't you rather have this nice 
system failure GOMF [ r ! end 'y. screen tha " a dose of Guru 



Meditation messages? 



us state you can 



he offending task 



won't stop all software failures but it does manage to trap a large 
percentage of them. 

You can load GOMF from our CLICK_ME menu program by 
selecting it from this month's list of programs or alternatively, it 
can be executed directly from the Workbench by clicking on its 
icon. Full instructions are included in the same drawer as the main 
program. 

Living happily within the GOMFdrawer is another program, 
called ERRl. This program can be is used in conjunction with 
GOMF to demonstrate how wonderful it is. ERRl's sole role in life 
is to crash your Amiga in as many ways as possible and so there- 
fore be very careful with it. Always install GOMF before running 
ERRl or your Amiga will have a fatal attack of the Gurus every 



FORMAT ■ 71 



HI 



DISK 



DISK DOCU- 
MENTATION 

Many of the programs on ST 
Amiga Format disks are 
Public Domain. In such cases 
we've simply passed on their 
standard documentation files 
unchanged, as is required by 
the PD code of practice. 
Some of the phrasing is 
'idiosyncratic', shall we say, 
so please don't blame us for 
misspellings! 



HOW TO USE THIS DISK 



The ST Amiga Format cover disk is a 
special format disk which both the ST 
and the Amiga can read. Even if you 
are a seasoned computer user, 
please read these instructions care- 
fully or you could permanently dam- 
age your copy of it. 

The first thing you must do is 
make a backup copy of the disk. 
Because of the special format, the 
normal disk-to-disk copying methods, 
as recommended in the Amiga and 
ST manuals, won't work. Instead you 
will need to format a blank disk and 
copy the files individually. Don't panic, 
this isn't at all difficult. 



HAVING 
TROUBLE WITH THE DISK? 

We have done our best to check that the programs supplied on this 
month's disk are simple to use, error free and have no known virus- 
es. However, we cannot answer telephone queries on using the 
software, and we do not accept liability for any consequences of 
using the programs. 

If your ST Amiga Format disk is faulty - and out of 40,000 
duplicated some are unfortunately bound to be - you should send it 
back for a free replacement to: 

ST Amiga Format November Disk, DisCopy Labs, 20 
Osyth Close, Braekmills, Northampton NN4 ODY. 

AMIGA OWNERS: if your Amiga refuses to accept the disk, try 
using the DISKDOCTOR utility on your Commodore Workbench disk 
to rescue it before sending off for a replacement We covered 
DISKDOCTOR fully on page 93 of Issue 1. Don't worry if every track 
gives you a 'hard error', this is the Amiga being unable to read the 
ST software on the disk. 



T 



WE WANT TO GIVE YOU MONEY! 

If you've got any programs for either ST or Amiga which you think 
other readers would find useful, interesting or amusing, we'd like to 
know. Here's how to go about securing international fame for 
yourself: 

1. Only send in programs on 3.5" disks; we cannot accept printed 
listings. 

2. Make sure your disk is clearly labelled with your name and 
address and the program name(s), and is marked 'ST or 'Amiga'. 

3. Make sure there's a documentation file on the disk called 
README. 

4. Enclose a clear covering note explaining what the program does, 
and if you possibly can please also send a printout of any on-disk 
documentation files. Remember your address and telephone 
number. Include a stamped return envelope for the disk if you want 
it back. 

5. THIS IS IMPORTANT: there must be a signed statement that the 
program is yours and that you are prepared to assign publication 
rights to ST Amiga Format. Use the following wording: 

The program/s (write the title here) is/are submitted for 
publication by ST Amiga Format magazine. It is my own work and 
has not been submitted for publication elsewhere. 

Signed ... 

If we accept your program, we will get in touch with you before 
publication to agree terms and payment rates. We will evaluate all 
submissions in a batch once a month, so please allow up to 40 days 
for return of your disks. We will only send back disks with adequate 
return postage and packing. 

6. If you send us a disk with a virus on it, we reserve the right to 
send round the heavy mob in the small hours and do unspeakable 
things to your pet budgie. Seriously, since we've already supplied 
Virus-killer programs (in Issue 1), do check your disks very 
carefully. 



72 ■ FORMAT 



ON THE ST 

{assuming a single drive 

machine] 

1. Take a blank disk and format it in 
the usual way. 

2. With the blank disk still in the drive, 
double click on the A: drive icon to 
open up the (blank) contents window. 

3. Now drag the icon for drive B: into 
the open window of disk A. This will 
copy all the files one by one off the 
master disk to your new disk. Make 
sure that the master ST Amiga 
Format disk is write protected (the 
sliding tab should be back so the hole 
is open) and put it in the disk drive 
when asked for disk B. 

4. You will now be prompted at vari- 
ous times to insert disk A and disk B 
while copying takes place. There will 
be a lot of swapping to do on a single 
drive ST! Disk B should be the master 
disk, disk A your newly formatted 
copy. 

If you want to cut down on disk 
swaps, you can use the Eternal RAM 
disk program provided on this 
month's disk as an intermediate step. 

ON THE AMIGA 
(assuming a single drive 
machine) 

1 . Start your Amiga up with your nor- 
mal Workbench boot disk. 

2. Take a blank disk and initialize it in 
the usual way. 

3. Make sure that the master ST 
Amiga Format disk is write protected 
and put it in the disk drive. Double- 
click on the disk icon that appears. 
Drag any icons you see in the con- 
tents window onto the 'RAM disk' 
icon. 

4. When the disk activity light has 
gone out, put your newly formatted 
copy disk in the drive instead. Double- 
click on the RAM drive icon to open 
its window, and drag program icons 
from that onto the new disk icon. This 
copies the files one by one. 

The programs may not all fit in 
the RAM drive at once on an A500 - 
do whatever will fit, then after step 3 
delete them from the RAM disk by 
clicking once on each and, holding 
the right mouse button down, select- 
ing discard from the Workbench 
menu. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the 
rest of the icons. 

USING THE 
PROGRAMS 

ON THE ST 

When you turn the ST on and put your 
working copy of the disk in the drive, 
you will see a window opened with 
the contents of the disk displayed. 

One of the icons is called 
CLICKJ/IE.PRG - just do what it says, 
double-click to run it. Up comes a list 



of the disk contents. Type the number 
of the program you want to run, and 
you are asked whether you want to 
read the disk help file or not. 

You will now be asked whether 
you want to run the program or not. 
As an alternative to using 
CLICK J/IEPRG, if you know enough 
about GEM you can click directly on 
the icons for individual programs. 
These normally end PRG with their 
documentation files having the same 
names but with .DOC filetypes. 
Always read the documentation 
before running the program. 

ON THE AMIGA 

Most of the programs on the cover 
disk are run from the Workbench, 
which must be loaded first from your 
normal start-up disk, as described in 
the Amiga manual. Once at the 
Workbench, put the ST Amiga Format 
disk in the drive and double-click on 
its icon to open it. 

You should find on the disk an 
icon for a program called CLICKJVIE, 
do exactly what it says and after a 
few seconds our cover disk menu 
program will have loaded. If you own 
a single drive Amiga then your 
machine will prompt you to swap 
disks a couple of times before the 
menu is loaded. Just follow the on- 
screen requesters and everything 
should load fine. 

Most of the programs on the disk 
can be executed from CLICK_ME by 
selecting them from the menu and 
choosing either to view the program's 
documentation or load the program. 
If a program fails to load from this 
menu (this sometimes happens 
through shortage of memory on unex- 
panded systems), you can load it 
from the Workbench instead, by click- 
ing on its icon. 

To load a program from the 



Workbench, you must first Click open 
the drawer which contains it. For 
detailed comments from the pro- 
gram's author click on the .DOC file 
icon in the same folder; to run the 
program click on the main icon. 

When you click on a documenta- 
tion file, a new window is opened and 
the text is displayed a screenful at a 
time. Press any key to move from 
one screenful to the next, or click on 
the close gadget in the top left-hand 
corner of the window to cancel the 
display. The READ_ME icon gives you 
a brief summary of the disk's con- 
tents and how to use it. 



NEW LOW PRICE Sn 




ONLY FROM SILICA 

Finally, there's a personal computer thai not only solves problems like other computers, but also solves 
the one problem that other computers have created. Affordabiltty. Silica Shop are pleased to present the 
ST range of personal/business computers from Atari. The ST was designed utilizing the most recent 
breakthroughs in semiconductor technology, producing a personal computer that performs tasks with 
fewer parts. Which means it costs less to make. And less to buy. The latest ST computers now include 
built In power supplies and built in disk drives. The TOS operating system and GEM window environment 
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When you purchase any Atari ST keyboard, you wiir not only receive the best value for money computer 
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• BASIC Language Disk • BASIC Manual ' ST Owners Manual ' TOS/GEM on ROM 
If you buy your ST from Silica Shop, you will also receive; 

' NEOchrome Sampler - colour graphics program ' 1st Word - Word Processor 
in addition, we at Silica would like to see you gel off to a flying start with your new computer, so we have 
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At Silica Shop, we have a dedicated service department of seven full time Atari trained technical staff. 
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1Mb RAM UPGRADE: Our upgrade on the standard Atari 520ST-M or 520ST-FM keyboard will 
increase the memory from 51 2K to a massive 1024K It has a full 1 year warranty and ts available from 
Silica at en additional retail price of only £86.96 (*VAT ■ £100) 
TV MODULATOR UPGRADE: Silica can upgrade the 1040ST-F lo Include a TV modulator so 
that you can then use it with your TV set. This is an internal upgrade and does not involve any untidy 
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which is only £49 (inc VAT). The upgrade is also available lor early 520ST computers at the same price. 

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We aim to keep stocks of all Atari related products and our warehouse carries a stock of over Vh million 
We import many software titles direct from the USA and you will find that we have new releases in 
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Rest assured that when you buy your ST from Silica Shop, you will be fully supported. Our free mailings 
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At Silica Shop, we recognise that serious users require an in-depth information service, which is why we 
mail free newsletters and price lists to our ST owners. These are up to 48 pages long and are crammed 
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Most orders are processed through our computer within 24 hours of receiving them. Most hardware 
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We hope that the combination of our low prices. FREE UK delivery service, FREE Starter Kit and FREE 
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there is something you wish to purchase, and you find one of our competitors offering it at a lower price, 
then please contact our sales department, providing us with our competitor's name, address and 
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SIDCUP (& Mail Order) 01-309 1111 

1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Road, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX 

LONDON 01-580 4839 

Lion House (1st floor), 227 Tottenham Court Rd, London, W1P OHX 

LONDON 01-629 1234 ext 3914 

Seif ridges (1st floor), Oxford Street, London, W1A 1AB 



SO MUCH FOR SO LITTLE 



There is nothing that can compare with the incredible value for money offered by Atari's 
520ST-FM. For only £260 (+VAT=£299), you can purchase a powerful 51 2K RAM computer, 
with a 95 key keyboard (including numeric keypad), MIDI interface, GEM, a palette of 512 
colours, mouse controller, and a 512K built-in disk drive. The 520ST-FM has a TV modulator 
built-in, and comes with a lead to allow you to plug it straight into any domestic colour 
television set. The mains transformer is also built-in to the keyboard, so there are no messy 
external boxes. You couldn't wish for a more compact, powerful and stylish unit. Atari ST 
computers are now firmly established in the UK, there are nearly 500 software titles already 
available for a wide variety of applications and the list is growing all the time. And that's not 
all. When you buy your new 520ST-FM (or any Atari ST computer) from Silica Shop, you will 
get a lot more, including a FREE Silica ST Starter Kit worth over £100. Read the ONLY FROM 
SILICA section on the left, to see why you should buy your new high power, low price 520ST- 
FM from Silica Shop, the UK's No1 Atari Specialists. For further details of the range of Atari 
ST computers and the FREE Silica ST Starter Kit, complete and return the reply coupon below 

AKI Oaww ■ —■ IVI FMvJVv UNLT JudDU vVAl —x,cM<t) 

520ST-FM with 512K RAM & mono monitor £399 (inc VAT) Upgrade from 512K RAM to 1024K RAM £100 (inc VAT 



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monitor. It does not therefore have an RF modulator for use 
with a domestic TV set Modulators can be fitted for £49 (inc VAT). 

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For the user who requires even more RAM than the 520 or 1040 
ST's offer, the new MEGA ST computers are now available. 
There are two MEGA ST's, one with 2Mb of RAM and the other 
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Unit with open architecture and a detachable keyboard. They 
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as with the 520 or 1040. Prices are as follows: 

MEGA $7 mo Keyboard 'CPU ... . am(incVAT) 

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ATARI 




To: Silica Shop Ltd, Dept.STFM.1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Road. Sidcup, Kent. DA 14 4DX 

PLEASE SEND ME FREE LITERATURE ON THE ATARI ST 

Mr/Mrs/ Ms: Initials: Surname: 



Address: 



Postcode: 



Do you a __ 

If so, which one do you own? 



X 




WE KNOW THAT! 

The Robot Book mentioned in 
issue three, while indeed pro- 
viding an informative read on all 
things robotic, contains details 
of many robot projects that can 
be built from Lego and 
Fishertechnik. Published by 
Windward it costs £7.95 in 
paperback and £12.95 in hard- 
back. ISBN 0-7112-0414-4. 



i 




REUIEkl 



ROBOKIT 
ST 



PRL's PROSE software has been controlling industrial 
robots for some time — now it's available on the ST. You 
won't be able to make R2D2 fetch the tea for you, but 
with a good Lego set you'll discover robotics isn't just for 
people with three brains. Richard Monteiro, with no brain, 
tries it out. 



£79.95 ■ ST only ■ 

Atari, Atari House, Railway Terrace, Slough, Berkshire, SL2 5BZ (0753 33344) 



Unlike many products feathered 
under Atari's wing, Robokit is ready 
just six months after being 
announced. It may have something to 
do with the fact that Personal Robots 
Ltd (PRL) of Henley, the chaps 
responsible for the development and 
design of Robokit ST, have had an 
industrial version of Robokit on the go 




for some years. The board and soft- 
ware are ready. Now it's up to Atari to 
deliver the goods: they are responsi- 
ble for production. Will it be available 
next month, next year or will the sky 
fall on our heads first? Who knows? 

Bricks and walls 

Robokit consists of interface, soft- 
ware and manual. While you can learn 
the theory simply by toying with the 
software, you will need a Lego 
Techmc set of sorts to enjoy the 
practical side of robotics. 
Unfortunately the sets you require are 
expensive, since optical sensors, 
motors and other specialised gad- 
getry are a must. To make matters 
worse, the kits are available only from 
certain educational retailers (check 
out the panel for more on this). 

The first stage is to build yourself 
a credible model from Lego. If you're 
stuck for ideas, the first part of the 
manual devotes over 40 pages to 
construction projects. Five projects 
are detailed: mini arm, lift operator, 
card reader, plotter, maxi arm. 
Whichever project you decide to 
undertake, the step-by-step instruc- 
tions ensure you won't go wrong. 

The manual was written at a time 



ABSOLUTE MOVEMENT 



Instructions to the mini arm, or whatever kit is 
attached, can be bundled together to form 
sequences. Unless special instructions are sent, all 
movement is relative: execution of a sequence pro- 
ceeds from whatever position the previous command 
left the model in. Sometimes this is unimportant and 
action can take place regardless of the robot's posi- 
tion. However, there are times when knowing the 
exact position of the robot or parts of its anatomy 
can be of the utmost importance. Similarly, you may 
want movement to start from a known position. 
Several Robokit commands cater for absolute posi- 
tioning. 

These commands rely on position reports from 



the robot; shaft encoders on the motors take care of 
this. 

Before you can use encoders, you must initialise' 
them. They then need calibrating, which means 
attaching some unit of measurement of the clicks of 
the encoder switches. One possible way of doing this 
is to place the arm or other object in the most 
extreme position and inform the computer of this. 

You can decide what distance you want a click of 
the encoder to represent. When the mini arm per- 
forms a complete circle about its vertical axis, for 
example, the encoder clicks 36 times; you might 
choose 36 clicks to represent 36Q (the number Gf 
degrees in a turn). 



74 ■ FORMAT 



when Lego didn't have any kits con- 
taining microswitches. Hence the 
Blue Peter-style guide to making your 
own. The guide isn't obsolete as only 
the most expensive kits now contain 
such switches. 

Along with construction details, 
the manual provides data for wiring 
the motors, sensors and switches to 
the Robokit interface. Once you've 
got a kit connected to the interface, 
you're ready to roll with PROSE - for 
Personal Robot Operating System 
and Environment. 

Backdrop 
to the future 

You will be prompted to load an 'RSU' 
file first off. RSU files are like GEM 
DESKTORINF files; they contain infor- 
mation on PROSE'S screen layout. 
Unsurprisingly there aren't any RSU 
files with the virgin system: you must 
create them. 

First you'll want to display an 
image (called a 'backdrop' by PRL) of 
the Lego device you are driving on 
screen. All projects listed in the manu- 
al have accompanying image files on 
the disk, and very dandy they are too. 
If you create a model other than 
those listed in the manual, you'll need 
to design your own backdrop. Any of 
Degas Elite, NeoChrome or GEM 
Paint can be used to create the back- 
drop. 

The reason for having a stylised 
picture of the device plugged into the 
interface is solely to aid communica- 
tion between you and the device. 
Icons can be added to the backdrop. 
These range from arrows (for repre- 
senting movement in particular 
planes, perhaps) to hands (for halting 
all movement, say). None of the icons 
mean anything specific until you 
attach control power to them, and 
then they can be given any meaning 
you feel fit. Twenty icons exist with no 



KITS SUITABLE FOR CONTROL 

Models built from Lego, Fischertechnik, Meccano, plastic, metal or balsa 
wood may alt be controlled by Robokit. Lego is preferable as many of the kits 
comprise motors, solenoids and microswitches that are vital for producing 
robots. You can even rip out wires from a remote controlled car and connect 
them to Robokit. 

Several Lego projects are included with the Robokit package - these are 
all based round Lego components. Lego supply some good designs with their 
1090 and 1092 Technic Control Sets (which contain everything you need 
from basic building blocks to motors and shaft encoders). Unfortunately 
these kits form part of the schools range and aren't available in shops. 

'Commotion' of 241 Green Street, 

Enfield, EN3 7TD (01-985 2391) can 
supply you with 1090 (£75+ VAT) and 
1092 (£99+VAT) packages along with 
other Lego parts. You can also 
approach Lego direct at Ruthin Rd, 
Wrexham, Clwyd, LLJ3 7TQ (0978 
290900). 

Many thanks to Commotion and 
Lego for their help - particularly to 

k | Lego who supplied a 1092 kit for use 

i^i • ^Er^,-— J( with Robokit. 







f/C 



provision for adding others or even 
editing existing ones - a pity. 

Be warned, the software only 
works in high or medium resolution. 
Medium resolution backdrops suffer 
from being stretched horizontally and 
consequently are cropped top and 
bottom. In other words, a mono moni- 
tor is recommended. PRL promise 
that a scaling utility for medium res 



monitors will be included with the 
package Atari release. 

Captain's log 

Next stage is to add commands to 
the icons. For instance you can ini- 
tialise a motor, make a motor rotate 
for a given amount of time in a given 
direction at a given speed, stop a 



Desk Systew Text Graphics Clock Message Sequencer Backdro p 



_s 



ci>reirgTg| allies 



&~\%x** 



§> 



«i<=)y|S 



Cancel I 



■ The 20 icons that can be added to the backdrop. Icons can have commands 
attached to them which tell motors and other components to perform certain 
jobs. For instance, a motor can rotate in a given direction at a given speed. 



D esk Systew Text Graphics Clock Message Sequencer Backdrop 




E3 



■ When you click on one of those icons a message is sent to the robot. These 
messages can be strung together in sequences and executed in one go. Hence 
the robot can perform mundane tasks indefinitely. 



motor and so on. Motor number, of 
which there can be eight, and output 
port number must also be supplied. 
Once this information has been sub- 
jected to the system, double clicking 
on the appropriate icon will cause 
part of the Lego kit to move. 

You may find that the wrong 
motor moves, or a motor moves in 
the wrong direction, or for the wrong 
time. But it doesn't take long before 
you're in full control. 

Robotics is all about letting some 
device get on with repetitive tasks. 
Essentially these tasks are pro- 
grammed sequences of instructions - 
something PROSE is quite capable of. 
Sequences of messages are record- 
ed by Robokit as you issue them; they 
can be replayed at any time, and may 
be attached to icons or even refer to 
other sequences. 

There remains one last notewor- 
thy technique offered by PROSE: Input 
Watching. This enables Robokit to 
watch for certain events - a switch 
closing because a buggy hits some- 
thing - and then act accordingly. This 
can be likened to BASIC'S IF... THEN 
statement, but is more powerful; the 
system looks for an event every five 
seconds in parallel with whatever else 
is going on and performs the conse- 
quent action immediately. 

And for you? 

Technical Lego is widely available - 
although specialised components 
might be harder to track down - and 
is a relatively cheap material for build- 
ing useable models. The control soft- 
ware is very easy to use and is based 
on a proven industrial version. The 
manual is excellent with numerous 
pages spent on the correct kit, build- 
ing models and hooking the finished 
models to the interface. 

For educational establishments 
and anyone interested in understand- 
ing the basics of robotics, Robokit is 
a must. You won't be able to control a 
robotic lawn mower, but you'll certain- 
ly gain an insight into how these 
machines work. 



for 

Excellent manual 
Control software is 
comprehensive without 
being difficult to use 
Features like event 
sensing allow good simu- 
lations 

against 

I Lego kits to control are 

expensive 
I Doesn't work properly yet 

with colour monitors 




LOSING 
CONTROL 

The Robokit interface we had 
for review was very open - it 
didn't have a case. There were 
also holes in the breadboard 
for adding custom circuitry, 
and an empty chip socket for 
better motor control. Atari 
have plans to box the thing 
(amongst other indecencies) 
which seems pointless: while 
the interface might look pretti- 
er, the idea is ultimately to 
control your own robotic cre- 
ations and be able to tinker 
with an y part of the system. 




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REUIEW 



AMIGA 
AMIGOS 



If you're an Amiga programmer, then these two utilities 
should make your life a lot easier. 



CYGNUS ED 



£75.00 ■ Amiga only ■ Amiga Centre Scotland, 4 Hart 
Street Lane, Edinburgh EH1 3RN (031-557 4242) 

What is a programmer's editor? It's 
not someone who leans over a 
machine coder's shoulder and says 
things like, "That sprite routine's rub- 
bish - write it again". Rather, it's a 
sort of word processor especially for 
programming. 

A lot of users will be baffled by 
that, because if you only program in 
Amiga BASIC, you won't need a sepa- 
rate editor - Amiga BASIC has its 
own. 

In all interpreted languages, the 
editor is an integral part of the pack- 
age. In compiled languages, like C 
and Pascal, the difference is much 
more obvious because the writing and 
executing of the program are distinct- 
ly separate. 

But virtually all languages are sup- 
plied with an editor of some descrip- 
tion, so why consider buying an editor 
like CygnusEd that doesn't come with 
a language? 



One, two, three 

There are, in fact, three good rea- 
sons. First, many standard editors are 
not particularly good. Second, if you 
program in more than one language, 
chances are you're using a different 
editor for each. By using something 
like CygnusEd you can use the same 
editor, and the same commands, 
regardless of the language you're 
using. Third, CygnusEd is powerful 
enough for most word processing 
applications, so you may not need to 
spend extra money on a dedicated 
WP package. 



CygnusEd, or CED to its friends, 
is a Rolls-Royce among editors, and 
even a brief encounter reveals some 
very powerful features. For example, 
you can have ten document windows 
open simultaneously, with a variety of 
uses for each. 

So, you could have ten different 
documents open, or you could have 
several versions of the same docu- 
ment, or ten views of the same docu- 
ment. The difference between the last 
two uses is that with different versions 
of the same document, changes to 
one do not affect the others, while 
with different views of one document, 
any change is universal (subtle but 
significant). 

Other key features include some 
powerful word processing facilities, 
such as a lightning fast search & 
replace {including the unusual option 
of using wildcards), block cutting and 
pasting, lots of text formatting 
options and the ability to display text 
in columns for newspaper-style lay- 
outs. 

But perhaps the most significant 
aspect of CygnusEd is the extent to 
which it allows you to set things up 
the way you want. Apart from choos- 
ing screen colours, there's a complete 
'keyboard macro' facility. This feature 
allows you to have CED emulate virtu- 
ally any text editor or word processor 
you wish. The package comes with a 
complete set of macros to allow CED 
to emulate MicroEmacs, or you could 
set it up to work like Wordstar (if 
that's what you really want). 



TALKING EDS 



"What about ED," some Amiga stalwarts will cry. ED is the Amiga's freebie 
text editor for writing CLI routines and the like. But anyone who has used it 
will be painfully familiar with the limitations of 'standard' text editors. Obscure 
commands and single line editing are among the biggest problems. It's just 
about usable for amending the start-up sequence. But if ED is poor for pro- 
gramming, it's an absolute write-off for word processing. The only thing you 
can say in ED's favour is that the price is right 



Finally, no review of this product 
should pass without mention of fea- 
tures that make CED one of the most 
reassuring programs to work with. 
There is an autosave option which 
saves your work at regular intervals; 
should the worst happen there's fur- 
ther security with a file-recovery utility. 
If your Amiga crashes while you're 
editing, you can do a warm reset, run 

RecoverCEDFiles, and CED will 

retrieve from memory any files that 
were being worked on at the time of 
the crash. 




■ Cygnus Ed working over a C program... the black bar in the mid- 
dle divides the two current editing windows. In this case, we're edit- 
ing two different parts of the same file at once. 



for 

Highly 'customisable' and 

friendly 
l Lightning fast - even with 

multiple windows open 
I Fully compatible with 

multi-tasking AmigaDOS 



against 

Weak for advanced word 
processing and document 
design 

Although clearly written, 
manual could be 
improved by use of sam- 
ple screens 




FORMAT M 77 



t£Oiii 



ARP! 
EXCUSE ME 

The ARP (AmigaDOS Replace- 
ment Project) was conceived 
by a group of top American 
software developers as an 
attempt to rid the Amiga of its 
frustrating (for programmers) 
BCPL-based operating system 
by rewriting the DOS library 
and most of AmigaDOS's com- 
mands in pure 68000 assem- 
bler. The ARP DOS commands 
not only run much faster but 
tend to be far more friendly 
with extensive wild card sup- 
port. 

Commodore have been 
offered ARP and if they 
accept, ARP could end up on 
ROM in future Kickstart releas- 



Obviously, success depends 
upon the relevant memory areas not 
being overwritten during the reset, 
but during testing CED managed a 
100 per cent recovery record. 

Too good 
to be true? 

But despite all this power, CygnusEd 
is not only easy to use but easy to 
learn. Every major function is avail- 
able from well-designed drop-down 
menus, and there are copious key- 
board shortcuts for those who prefer 
to keep their hands on the keyboard 
during the writing process. Everything 
is simply explained in the manual, 



although some sample screens would 
have made things even clearer. 

For word processing applica- 
tions, CED is not perfect. For exam- 
ple, there's no built-in spelling check- 
er, although you could use one of the 
many add-on packages available. Nor 
will it handle certain common WP 
functions like headers and footers or 
mail-merge, nor allow you to incorpo- 
rate graphics into your documents. 

However, for the basics of get- 
ting words onto paper, and for pro- 
gramming applications of all kinds, 
ifs fast, friendly and powerful. In fact, 
CygnusEd is close to perfection. 

Peter Worlock 




WSHELL 

£32.00 ■ Amiga only, all models ■ 

Amiga Centre Scotland, 4 Hart Street Lane, Edinburgh 

EH1 3RN (031-557 4242) 



When the Amiga was first released 
onto an unsuspecting public, while 
much of its design was then unique 
for a micro, the basic workhorse of 
the system, (its disk operating sys- 
tem) was based on a rather creaky 
DOS called TRIPOS from Cambridge 
University. 

AmigaDOS unfortunately inherited 
many annoying traits such as lack of 
command line history and line editing. 
Programmers often find AmigaDOS's 
quirky BCPL-written system structure 
more of a hindrance then a help and it 
is with all these points in mind that 
WShell was developed. 

If you have used the famous pub- 
lic domain console handler, ConMan, 
the name of William S. Hawes will 
already be familiar to you. WShell con- 
tinues where ConMan leaves off. 

For those not in the know, 
ConMan is an enhancement of the 
standard AmigaDOS CLI handler 
which allows you to cycle through the 
history of previous command lines 
typed by pressing the up-arrow key, 
and to then edit a chosen line with the 
cursor keys and action it by pressing 




for 

Command line history 
Some commands built in, 
rest can be made resident 
Comes with ARP, the 
'improved' CLI. 
Clear manual 



against 

Once Workbench 1.3 
arrives, the main benefits 
are free 

Some important com- 
mands missing from 
'built-in' list 



[Return]. Invaluable when AmigaDOS 
command lines can run to 80 charac- 
ters - and one wrong key means 
retyping the lot! 

Alias 
Smith and Jones 

WShell includes the latest release of 
ConMan, version 1.1, and offers an 
extensive list of new features that 
greatly enhance it. For example: 
■ Command Aliases: these allow you 
to define synonyms for regularly used 
commands. If you type list 



grams. If you don't have any, don't 
worry. 

■ Concurrent piping: the output of 
one task can be channelled to the 
input of another, even if the are run- 
ning in parallel. This is like a concur- 
rent version of the CU's > operator. 

Many of WShell's features are 
inspired by the Unix environment, an 
increasingly popular operating system 
in America. 

Getting up and running with 
WShell requires a certain amount of 
setting up, but thankfully all the hard 
work is handled by an AmigaDOS 
batch file that simply needs to be set 
in motion with the DOS command 

EXECUTE. 

The WShell manual is generally 
well written and fully indexed which 



Workbench Screen 



IBM** U&eH 



HShell VI, 8 Us 
15:56:52) 



: 15157:15) Is 

ENV (dir) 
no~M stai'tu] 

StartuHJSJiell 
15:57:21) AH as 
Is = "DIR s:" 

15:57:33) Alias PIP COPY 
15:59:42) PIP slStartUp-Sequence ran 
. 16:80:07) Alias 
PIP - "COPY" irj 

■ s , = H:88?iS> te^y. 



tai'tup-sequenc 



Amga USheli Version 1.8 

Copyright S 1588 by Hillian S. Haws 

All Rights Reserved, 

15:55:17) 

15:56:44) news*) 
: 15:56:51) news. Swsh 



■ If you are determined to, WShell allows you to redefine your entire CLI com- 
mand name system with its 'Alias' feature. Here we've begun setting up a Unix- 
lookalike where you type is instead of dir. 



pat=#?.c a lot, you could set up the 
shorter uz to do it for you. 

■ Resident Commands: you can per- 
manently install any command in 
memory so that the Amiga won't put 
up a disk change requester when you 
try and run it. 

■ Built-in commands: the AmigaDOS 
commands CD, ECHO, IF, ELSE, 
ENDIF, PAUSE, PROMPT and a few 
other exotic directory swapping com- 
mands are permanently built into 
memory without you even needing to 
ask for them to be resident; unfortu- 
nately no DIR function is built-in. 

■ There's a REXX language handler, 
for compatibility with other REXX pro- 



unfortunately has become a rare sight 
recently. Many software companies 
tend to rush program documentation 
which can have the effect of making a 
program completely unusable to the 
average user. 

Although Workbench 1.3 features 
an enhanced console handler called 
AmigaSHELL, WShell should still be 
considered a must for all serious 
CLI-ers. WShell also includes the pub- 
lic domain ARP (AmigaDOS 
Replacement Project) files. The pow- 
erful features of WShell coupled with 
ARP make the WShell package a rec- 
ommended purchase. 

Jason Holborn 



78 ■ FORMAT 




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Jet (Sublogic) 26.95 

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Skychase 13.95 

Barbarian II 10.50 

Platoon 12.95 

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MERCENARY COMPENDIUM 
SPECIAL PRICE £12.75 



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.barbarian' 




ALL 5 GAMES £15.95 



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ARCADE CLASSICS 

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ALL 3 GAMES ONLY £9.95 



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FOR ST OR AMIGA 

(Please state machine) 

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Ask for Computer Hits 



Any game not released will be sent on the day of release. 

These are mail order prices only. 

CASTLE COMPUTERS THE COMPETENT MAIL ORDER COMPANY 




BIG NUMBERS 

To give you some idea of the 
size of numbers BASIC can 
express, the estimate for the 
total number of sub-atomic 
particles in the universe is 
10 , which is a lot less than 
the size of the largest double- 
precision number. 



■ iate H, 9y" so ware "'?! H 



rfE^ 



PROGRAMMING 



LEARN 
BASIC 



We haf Arrays of making you talk. This month it's data 
structures and the different types of variables that BASIC 
supports. Simon Williams puts numbers in them, sticks 
words up them and pulls them all back out (sounds 
horrid!) 



In the first part of this series we 
looked at variables, the boxes 
where numbers or letters are 
stored within a BASIC program. There 
are two main types of variable: 
numeric for numbers and string for 
everything else. There's rather more 
to it than this, though, as numeric 
variables themselves can be divided 
into two sub-types: integer and real. 

An integer variable is one which 
has no fractional or decimal part. The 
numbers 1, 287, 384623 and -78 
are all integers, but 1.0, 287.35, 
384623.1234267, -78.9 and 1 1/2 
are not. 

A lot of the numbers you use in 
programming don't need any decimal 
part and should therefore be defined 
as integers. There are three reasons 
for this: integer arithmetic is per- 
formed much faster than floating 
point (it's much easier for a micro to 
calculate 12 x 3 than 12.0 x 3.0), 
integers remove the possibility of 
^ rounding errors as they have no 
L fractional part, and integers 
take much less space 
than equivalent reals. 
Integers 
take a maxi- 
mum of 






bytes 
each, 
while 
reals can 
take up to 
eight. Although 
this may not be 
important when pro- 
grams are relatively 
short and numeric vari- 
ables few, if you start 
using arrays, explained later 
in this exciting episode, the 
differences in space usage can 



be enormous. A bit of forward plan- 
ning can mean the difference 
between running a program and hav- 
ing one which is too large to fit in 
memory. The variables and arrays 
used by a program can often take a 
lot more space than the program 
itself. 

This isn't the end of it, though, as 
integers and reals can be sub-divided 
again. If you don't tell BASIC other- 
wise, integers are 16 bit (two bytes) 
long and have a range of -32768 to 
32767. If you try and assign a num- 
ber larger than this to a simple inte- 
ger variable you'll get an error mes- 
sage. Power BASIC (though not 
Amiga BASIC) allows a second type 
of integer, the long integer, which 
takes four bytes and can represent 
any number from -2147483648 to 
2147483647. Real numbers, in both 
BASICs, can have two precisions, 
which determine the size and accura- 
cy of the number that can be repre- 
sented. Single precision, which is the 
norm, can handle numbers up to 10 18 
(10- s in Amiga BASIC) with a resolu- 
tion of about 7 digits. Double preci- 
sion numbers can be up to 1.8 10 ;c3 
(which is pretty big) and are accurate 
to around 16 digits. 

Marking up 

You may be wondering how BASIC 
can distinguish between all these dif- 
ferent types of variable? Wonder no 
longer, it's all done with suffixes. 
You've already come across one suf- 
fix used in BASIC to define string vari- 
ables. The dollar sign ($) added to 
the end of a variable name tells 
BASIC that its contents are a string of 
characters. Similarly, all the numeric 
types have suffixes. Integers use a 
percent sign (%), long integers an 
ampersand (&), single precision reals 
an exclamation mark (! - sometimes 
known as 'pling') and double precision 
a hash (#). For practice, name the fol- 
lowing variable types: 

Mo of starss 



Name$ 

Count % 

Mass_of_Sun! 

Time_t o_e nd_o £J0 n i ve r s e # 

Total_msects 

The last variable would be a single 
precision real, as this is what BASIC 
assumes if left to work it out for 
ftself. 

As an alternative, you can use 
BASIC'S DEFxxx statements to specify 
a range of initial letters which auto- 
matically define a type of variable. 
For example, the statements: 

DEFINT A-C 
DEFLNG F 
DEFSNG G-J 
DEFDBL K-R 
DEFSTR S 

would define all variables beginning 
with A, B or C as integers, variables 
beginning with F as long integers, 
those from G to J as single precision 
reals and so on. You can use any sin- 
gle letter, range or ranges of letters 
to define a particular variable type. 

Know what I 
mean, Array? 

As you know, variables can be 
thought of as boxes in which you 
store words or numbers. For a lot of 
purposes this is all you'll need. There 
are a lot of other purposes, though, 
when you need a co-ordinated set of 
data which is difficult to create with 
independent variables. An array 
solves this problem by providing a 
structured set of variables which can 
be treated as a whole or through its 
component parts. 

Picture an array as a set of lock- 
ers, say 10 across by five high (a 
total of 50 boxes). Into each of these 
lockers you can place data, and you 
can refer to any locker by its co-ordi- 
nates within the whole block, for 
example third locker along on the 
forth row up. 

As arrays can be virtually any 



DOING IT FOR THE FIRST TIME 

Using BASIC for the first time? Here's how to get the programs up and run- 
ning: 

Amiga BASIC first. Reset the computer and insert your Workbench disk 
into a drive. When the Workbench appears, replace the disk with the Amiga 
Extras/Amiga BASIC disk. An Extras disk icon will appear. Double click on 
this icon and wait for the contents of the disk to appear. Double click on the 
AmigaBASlC icon when you spot it. Amiga BASIC is now ready to use. 

On the $T, insert either issue 2's cover disk or Hisoffs Power BASIC disk 
and press the reset button. If you're using me cover disk, double click on the 
CLICK^ME.PRG icon when it appears and then select the appropriate item 
from the menu. For the full version double click on the PBASIC.PRG Hie icon 
(or HBASIC.PRG if using the £79.95 HiSoft BASIC package). You're ready to 
roll. 

Now read the rest of the article to find out how you can create BASIC 
programs. 



4WGA 




size, BASIC demands that you set 
them up explicitly with the DIM com- 
mand. This takes the form: 

DIM Arrayname (x) 

where 'Arrayname' is the name of the 
array (governed by the same rules 
used in naming a 'regular' variable), 
and Y determines the number of lock- 
ers in a row. You're not limited to a 
single row of lockers, though, and 
could set up a block of them as in the 
example with a command like: 

DIM LockerS (10, 5) 

Note that the array name has a dollar 
suffix, indicating that it's a string 
array. Arrays take the same suffices 
as ordinary variables, and all ele- 
ments dockers') in the array must 
contain the same type of data. The 
numbers specify a size of 10 by 5 
elements. You can continue adding 
dimensions to the array by putting in 
extra commas and numbers of ele- 
ments. For example, you could define 
a three-dimensional array (to make a 
cube of lockers) with the command: 

DIM Locker? (10, 5, 4) 

When you get above three dimen- 
sions, though, it gets a bit hard to 
visualise, unless you're into temporal 
distortion. 

If you want the array to be avail- 
able to sub-programs as well as the 
main program, you must add the 
word SHARED to the DIM statement. 
For instance: 



DIM SHARED LockerS ( 10, 5, 4 ) 

A good READ 

The advantage of using arrays is that 
you can perform repeated calcula- 
tions on numbers or strings in the 
lockers of the array. This is most easi- 
ly done with a loop, such as a 
FOR. -.NEXT loop (covered in Issue 3) 
and is particularly useful when loading 
in or printing a lot of information. The 
program TELEPHON.BAS on the disk 
uses WHILE.. .WEND and FOR.. .NEXT 
loops to input up to ten names and 
telephone numbers into two arrays 
and then retrieve any number when 
given the name to search for. 



There are two more commands 
which are very useful when reading 
into an array: READ and DATA. You 
can build information into your pro- 
gram by including it in lists after the 
word DATA, and read it into the lock- 
ers of an array with the READ state- 
ment. Have a look at this program 
segment to see how it's done: 

DIM animal? (10) 

FOR count-1 TO 10 

READ animal? (count) 

NEXT count 

FOR count=10 TO 1 STEP -1 

PRINT animal? (count) 

NEXT count 

DATA Aardvark, Glyptodon, 

Armadillo, Sloth, Ant eater, 

Echidna, Pangolin, Tapir, 

Capybara, Coypu 

This program defines an array, ani- 
mals, and reads 10 animals' names 
into it with the READ statement. Each 
time a READ is performed the count 
variable is incremented so that the 
next READ fills another locker. The 
whole process of loading the data is 
carried out in just three, lines of 
BASIC, as is the second part of the 
program, which prints out the ani- 
mals' names in reverse order. When 
BASIC comes across a DATA state- 
ment in normal program execution, it 
ignores the line and goes straight on 
to the following one. You can there- 
fore put DATA statements anywhere 
within a program. BASIC remembers 
which DATA items have already been 
read, though, and will always go to 
the next item with each new READ. 

The second program, PHONE- 
DAT. BAS on the disk shows how 
TELEPHON could be adapted to load 
names and numbers from DATA state- 
ments. PHONEDAT also uses a two 
dimensional array rather than the two 
single dimension ones in the first pro- 
gram. 



LISTINGS ON DISK 



To complement this month's instalment on data structures we have two short 
'telephone list' style routines on the disk. They are deliberately short and 
simple: there is plenty of opportunity to improve or adapt them. 

To load listings into AmigaBASlC, reset your Amiga and insert a 
Workbench disk. When the WIMP environment appears, replace the 
Workbench disk with your Extras disk. Double click on the AmigaBASlC icon 
after clicking on the Extras disk icon. AmigaBASlC will load. Go to the 
Project menu and select Open. Click on the Drawer requester and enter 
LEARNBASIC. Click on the Filename requester, insert the Format cover disk 
containing the BASIC files, type in TELEPHON.BAS and press [Return]. The 
file will load. You may run it by clicking inside the BASIC window and typing 
RUN (not forgetting to press [Return] afterwards). Use the filename PHONE- 
DAT.BAS instead of TELEPHON.BAS for the second program. 

Loading listings into PowerBASIC (demo version supplied with Issue 2 
only): reset your ST and place the Issue 2 cover disk in the drive. Double 
click on the CLICK_ME.PRG file icon when it appears. Choose Power BASIC 
(Fl) from the menu. Power BASIC will load. The BASIC listings are loaded 
into Power BASIC by inserting the current cover disk and selecting Load 
from the File menu. Double click on the TELEPHON.BA or PHONEDAT.BA file 
that appears in the file selector box. The chosen file will load ready for run- 
ning. Unencrypted versions of these programs are also on the disk, with 
.BAS filetypes. These can't be loaded into our demo version of Power BASIC, 
but can be used with either the full version of Power BASIC or, with some 
modification, any other ST BASIC. 



MARGINAL 
FACTS 

Aardvark - a South American 
anteater 

Glyptodon • a prehistoric 
proto-armadillo 
Armadillo - a latterday 
Glyptodon 

Sloth - slowest moving mam- 
mal in the world 
Anteater • animal which eats 
ants 

Echidna - spiney anteater 
Pangolin - scaley anteater 
Tapir * large mammal, related 
to the elephant 
Capybara - world's largest 
rodent 

Coypu - large rodent, import- 
ed for fur, now wild in East 
Anglia 




RESTORE 

If you need to move the data 
pointer back to the start of 
the DATA statements in a 
program, you can issue the 
RESTORE command to do 
just that. RESTORE can also 
be used to move to a label 
just before any DATA state- 
ment. 



FORMAT m 81 




DESKTOP 



Dodges, Enhancements, Secrets, Kludges, Tricks, and Oodles of Prizes 
— that's Desktop. All the facts you need to further your understanding 
of the ST. Roland Givan of Brentwood wins £30 for sorting out printing 
problems from First Word. 



More Desktop 

Further to the tips on hacking 
about with DESKTOP.INF published 
in issue two. Within the INF file you 
will find a line similar to #g 03 ff 
-*-.prg@@. Try altering PRG to 
something else - RUN, say. If you 
reset the computer and try to exe- 
cute any PRG files, you will find 
that you won't be able to. It's a 
great way of playing jokes on fel- 
low STers. Altering file extensions 
from PRG to RUN will enable you 
to execute the files in the usual 
way. 

R Henderson 
Liverpool, Merseyside 

Bright lights 

Choose the paintbrush or pencil 
facility within Neochrome and 
press the right mouse button 
while the pointer is in the drawing 
area. You'll find that any lines you 
draw will appear multicoloured. 
Select colour-cycling for a really 
interesting effect. 
Micky Ogawa 
Hampstead, London 

B for drive 

The method of allowing software 
to boot from drive B as described 
by JR Mason in September's desk- 
top is neither safe nor easy. A far 
simpler method is to load in a 
software patch from drive A which 
alters one of the ST's system vari- 
ables. This then forces drive B to 
boot whenever a reset occurs. 
The assembly program below, 
written in Fast BASIC, forces drive 
B to boot when the reset button is 
hit. 

RESERVE code%,$100 

PATH$="A:\AUTO\" 

ON ERROR CLOSE #file% : END 

file%=OPENOUT "BCQT_B.PRG" 

FOR Passv=l TO 2 

| 

OPT Pass-i, "D+H+L-",file" 

ORG codeS 

PEA boot Jd (PC) 

82 ■ FORMAT 



MOVE #38, -(A7) 

TRAP #14 

boot_b 

MOVE #1, $446 

MOVE.L $4F2,-(A7) 

RTS 

] 

NEXT Pass ^5 

CLOSE |file% 

Save the code into an AUTO 
folder on drive A. When the 
machine is reset, the code will run 
forcing drive B to boot. Provided 
the machine is not switched off, 
all subsequent resets will cause 
drive B to boot. 

On the cover disk in a folder 
called B_BOOT you will find an 
AUTO folder containing 

B_BOOT.PRG. Copy the auto fold- 
er and its contents to another 
disk. Insert the disk with the AUTO 
folder in the drive and press the 
reset button. Drive B will boot 
from now on. 
I Mitchell 
Camberley, Surrey 

File selectors 

The standard GEM file selector 
isn't mentioned at all in the ST 
owner's manual, so here are some 
notes concerning its use. 

A file can be selected by 
either double clicking on the 
appropriate filename or by typing 
in the name at the file selection 
prompt and pressing [Return]. 

A list of all available files is 
shown in the box headed by the 
title bar. Only nine filenames can 
be displayed in the box at once; 
the others can be viewed by click- 
ing on the arrows at top and bot- 
tom of the box. Alternatively the 
scroll bar can be dragged in an 
upward or downward direction. 
Any items with a diamond icon to 
the left of them are folders, not 
files. These can be opened by 
clicking on them once and usually 
contain more files. 

If you click on a folder the 
new pathname (the previous path 



with the new folder name added 
to it) appears under the 'Directory' 
heading. This can be altered man- 
ually. Get to it using the up arrow 
key or by positing the mouse 
pointer on the Directory line and 
clicking. The left and right arrow 
keys move you through the direc- 
tory pathname. You can enter 
characters or remove them 
(Backspace). [Esc] clears the path- 
name completely; clicking on the 
title bar restores the pathname to 
A:\*-.* 

To register any to the path- 
name, either click on the title bar 
or anywhere underneath it. To exit 
a folder click on the 'close box' 
icon on the left of the title bar. 

Incidentally, as well as using 
the wild card character * - which 
is used to replace either the name 
or file extension (PROGRAM.* or 
*.BAS) - in pathnames, the ques- 
tion mark (?) can also be used. 
This replaces a single letter in the 
name or extension. For instance, 
*.B??orD?S?T?P.I?F. 
I Mitchell 
Camberley, Surrey 

Scart races 

Medium resolution displayed on a 
television leaves a lot to be 
desired. The way round this is to 
buy a £400 colour monitor - fine 
if you've got that sort of dosh to 
throw around. However, there is 
an alternative if your television is 
fitted with a scart socket. It will 
look something like: 

This socket offers a much 
improved picture. Unfortunately 
there is more than one scart stan- 
dard. When you purchase an Atari- 
to-scart lead you will find that it's 
wired to CAA 1 specification; this 
may work fine on some televi- 
sions. If not, then try the following 
alterations: connect Atari monitor 
pin 8 (12 Volt pullup) to scart pin 
8 and place a +1 to +3 Volt dc 
level on scart pin 16 (this can be 
derived from the 12 Volt Atari 



monitor pin 8 via a resistor. 
Switch the television to AV (VCR) 
mode and all should work. 

Here's a pin connection table 
for scart sockets: 



■ 1 II Til II 1 


21 


.1 J J J J JJJ J J 


\ 

lard 


pin VCR standard CAA 1 stanc 


1 sound out (r) 


n/c 


2 sound in (r) 


sound in (r) 


3 sound out (1) 


n/c 


4 ground 


ground 


5 ground 


ground 


6 sound in (1) 


sound in (!) 


7 blue 


blue 


8 12 V pullup 


n/c 


9 ground 


ground 


10 n/cn/c 




11 green 


green 


12 n/cn/c 




13 ground 


ground 


14 n/cn/c 




15 red red 




16 RGB status 


n/c 


17 ground 


n/c 


18 ground 


ground 


19 n/cn/c 




20 sync 


sync 


21 ground 


ground 





Note that the sync signal is 
derived by connecting two 470^ 
resistors to Atari monitor pins 9 
and 13, and then combining the 
two resistors at scart pin 20. Only 
one ground connection needs to 
be made. 

Format health warning: this 
wiring requires some soldering. 
Don't attempt the project if you 
are unsure what a resistor is or 
have never used a soldering iron. 
Remember, most ST repair shops 
will be able to make one of these 
ST-to-scart connectors for you. Of 
course, it will cost more than mak- 
ing it yourself, though. 
Mark Doxey 
Failsworth, Manchester 




Perverted 
characters 

When you're using ST BASIC try 
pressing [Control] while hitting 
keys on the keyboard: you'll dis- 
cover an abundance of extra char- 
acters. 
Philip Shore 
Hitchin, Hertfordshir 

Last word 
on First Word 

Having trouble printing all the ST's 
symbols from First Word? Here's a 
solution, but first a paragraph of 
explanation. 

Most printers have different 
character sets from the ST; some 
(Brother HR5, for instance) can't 
even cope with printing the hash 
(#) and pound (£) in the same doc- 
ument. The problem is, as far as 
the printer is concerned, that both 
symbols occupy the same ASCII 
number. Your printer will print '#' 
for the hash symbol with the print- 
er switched to US character set, 
but, '£' for hash with the UK char- 
acter set installed. Some printers 
allow you to switch character sets 
from software, others don't. 

The solution is to edit (using 
First Word) the printer driver for 
your printer and re-install it. For 
the HR5 it is best to start on the 
file ASCII. HEX which can be found 
in the PRINTER folder. In the part 
marked "Translation table" find the 
line 

9C * No pound sterling 

and replace it with 

9C, IB, 4B, 06, 00, 12, 
7E, 92, 92, 42, 00 
% Pound sterling 

What the hex numbers mean: 

9C - Atari code for pound sign. 

IB, 4B - puts the printer into 

standard graphics mode. 

06, 00 - tells the printer to 

expect six columns of graphic 

data 

12, 7E, 92, 92, 42, 00 - data 

making up pound sign 

Save the modified file and run 
the Install program to create a 
new version of 1ST_PRNT.D0T. 
Move this file into the same direc- 
tory as First Word. Also make 
sure that the printer is set to USA 
character mode. 

If you don't have an HR5, con- 
sult your printer's manual - the 
principle's the same. You will also 
have to determine how large char- 
acters are so that the graphics 
symbol will fit in exactly one char- 
acter space. Using a similar 
method it should be possible to 
print any of the ST's peculiar char- 
acter set. However, as the charac- 
ters end up as graphic data, 



TIPS 



BEGINNER'S CORNER 



VIEW MENU 

The third option in the menu bar is View; this iets 
you control file display. For instance, files can be 
displayed as icons or text and may be sorted in a 
number of ways. 

Make sure you have a window with several files 
in it displayed on screen. Move the arrow pointer to 
the View option; a menu falls down. You should see 
a number of items - two of which have ticks to the 
left of them. These ticks tell you which options are 
currently selected. For arguments sake assume 
"Show as Icons" and "Sort by name" are tagged like 
this. These options mean that files will be repre- 
sented by icons and displayed in alphabetical 
order. 

SHOW AS TEXT 

When 'Show as Icons' is selected, all files are repre- 
sented as icons with their filenames beneath. 
Sheets of paper with a corner folded over represent 
data or text files and those with a solid bar at the 
top are programs. The third type of icon is the fold- 
er (which looks just like a folder). 

To display files as text simply click on 'Show as 
Text' from the View menu. When a file is displayed 
as text, the window shows the filename and size as 
well as the date and time the file was last modified. 
A small diamond icon next to a filename indicates 
that the file is a folder, not an application or text 
file. 

SORT BY NAME, DATE, SIZE OR TYPE 

Opening a window causes files to be ordered 

according to the sort option from the View menu: 

Name - displays files in alphabetical order. 

Date - lists files chronologically. The most recently 

created or revised file appearing first 

Size - lists files according to the number of bytes 

they occupy - largest first 

Type - shows files alphabetically according to their 

extensions. 



Options 




ShoN as Icons | 
Show as Text 



486473 bytes I Sort by Date 



□ I Sort by Size f |—| 

I J_ ort S T ¥ pe 1 Id Ld 



□ □ □ □ □ 

£L □ JLJ3 __□ 
"51 15' iSI JJL a 

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■ This time files are shown as icons in alphabeti- 
cal order. 



Desk File 


I2EJI Options 












Show as Inons ^Bpjl 






Hjs 9 1! 


V Snow as Text ■LJI 






FLO^FV ■>■•> ||TLOm 












01 


Sort by Kane 
Sort by Date 
Sort by Size 


J SB 




486473 bytes 




a fiUTO 

EXFILE 


-B4-87 
t 11-85 


1ZSB1 an 
12:11 an 


JL 


STARTUP 51 ZO-11-05 


12:14 an 






FACTORY BBS 6585 28-11-85 


12:11 an 






FLIPPER BB5 62B2 28-11-85 


12:11 an 


— 




FUTURES BB5 16733 ZB-11-85 


12:11 an 






0UICKIES BBS 5Z86 28-11-85 


12:13 an 






RDBOKIT BB5 11533 23-63~B8 


12:50 an 




ST-PO B85 6B44 2Z-B4-87 


81:13 an 






F0RMAT11 flCC B832 2Z-B4-87 


81:69 an 






FACTORY BAK 6534 28-11-85 


12:11 an 






FLIPPER BflK 5732 28-11-85 


12:11 an 






FUTURES BAK 178Z1 2B-U-B5 


12:11 an 




mrmcTF^ rqk saw ?b-h-r<; 


17-11 M 







0[_ 


l£ 


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■ The View menu allows you to alter the way files 
are displayed on screen. 



w \i 


Show as Text 


i 


FLOW 9ISK|rkO»l 


Sort by Kane 

Sort by Date 

s/ Sort by Size 

Sort by Type 


^TRBKM^J 


el 


|X 


486473 bytes 




□ 

Q 

□ 
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□ □- 

□ □ 

□ □ 
"3 5 

□ □- 

n fi 1 


□"""□" 
W □ 

5. ..£l 

ni ri 


«i 




. ■* K 



■ And again... this time files are ordered accord- 
ing to the extension. 



Desk File 


I'HJil Options 








RfCtBB 5ho« as Icons ■ 




Isffl 1! 


• snw as Text IHII1 












of 


Sort by Hane | 




X 




486473 bytes 


Mi*nim_ 


a AUTO 


Sort by Size %B4-87 
Sort by Type !.».» 


12:81 an 


Q 


ROBOKIT 


12:5B an 






ROBOKIT Bffc 11854 23-B3-88 


12:37 an 






ST-PD BB5 6B44 22-B4-87 


81:13 an 






F0RMAT11 ACC B832 22-B4-87 


51:86 an 






ST-PD BAK 6B64 22-B4-87 


12:58 an 






HELCOhE THY 3733 28-11-85 


12:3B an 






STARTUP 51 28-11-85 


12:14 an 






SPEEDTST PRE 5744 28-11-85 


12:14 an 






SPEED3 PRE 4382 28-11-85 


12:14 an 






SPEEDTST BAS 7B2 2B-11-85 


12:14 an 






SPEEDTST BAK 634 28-11-85 


12:14 an 






SPEED2 PRE 4326 28-11-85 


12:13 an 






RFUTFU TMD «I7fl 7B-11-RS 


17. IT an 


$ 




O] 


1* 


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■ The same files shown as text in Date (chrono- 
logical) order. 



effects such as bold and underline 
won't work. 
Roland Givan 
Brentwood, Essex 

STAC stuff 

By altering system messages 
9923 and 9924 you can change 
the colours on the top line of the 
screen. You can even add graphic 
characters or sound (look at 
Shymer, for instance). 



Certain messages and condi- 
tion lines on the 'quickstart' file 
are not always required. Message 
9933, for example, will only be 
used if you are coding a two-part 
game. Once deleted these will 
save a little memory. IFs and extra 
spaces are also memory hungry. 
They can make messages look 
untidy and take up precious bytes. 
Locations with large pictures only 
need small textual descriptions. 

Low priority commands, 



which give general replies ('You 
can see nothing special.', 'You fly 
into the air.' and so on) should be 
added only when everything else 
has been tested. Try to put a gen- 
eral reply for as many words as 
possible: 

JUMP: "Wheee! Isn't jumping fun?" 
HELP: "Pay me lots of money." 
DIG: "You can't dig here!" 
R Henderson 
Liverpool, Merseysid 



FORMAT ■ 83 




WORKBENCH 



Enough tips to satisfy Alex Higgins on a bad day - two pages of hither- 
to unknown tricks about the Amiga and its software. This month David 
Millard from Gloucester wins £30 for his neat method of creating ani- 
mations on Deluxe Paint- Could it be you next time? 



Deluxe 

Animator? 

Here's a way to get simple (one 
colour) animations of up to 30 
frames using the 'colour cycling' 
facilities of Deluxe Paint. With 
adaptation, the same method 
could be used for any art package 
offering colour cycling. 

For example, try making up a 
bouncing ball animation. This 
could just be a ball dropping and 
rising, squashing as it hits the 
ground. The colours that are open 
for you to use are numbers 3 to 
32 on the palette. Select colour 3 
and draw a filled circle at the top 
centre of the screen. 

Now draw a sequence of balls 
of the same size falling to the bot- 
tom of the screen - the best way 
to do this is by picking up the first 
circle as a brush. Try to make the 
gaps between each ball bigger as 
they drop further down - in real 
life balls speed up as they drop 
under gravity. 

At the bottom of the ball's 
path where it hits the ground, 
draw a flattened oval is if the ball 
was squashing as it bounces. 
Draw more circles to represent 
the ball bouncing back, making 
sure there are no overlaps with 
existing circles. You can have up 
to 30 objects on the screen, one 
of each of the last 30 colours on 
the palette. 

For a quick preview, press the 
[Tab] key (above [Ctrl]) and you'll 
see the colours cycle - but it gets 
better. 

Go to the palette editing 
menu (by pressing P). Redefine all 
the colours 3 to 32 as black - the 
best way to do this is to click on 
colour 32, drag its colour bars to 
black, click on colour 3, drag its 
bars to black, then you can 
change all the rest at once by 
clicking on 'Spread' (you will see 
the cursor change to a TO' 
prompt) and then clicking on 



DPaint 



Color- 




■ The screen set up for a bouncing ball animation in Deluxe Paint ('Deluxe Animator' tip). All the shapes are the 
same except for the two positions where the frog hits the ground. 



colour 32 again. This makes 
colours 3 to 32 an even spread of 
black to black in 30 delicate 
shades of black. 

Now make colour number 32 
the shade that you want your ani- 
mation to be seen in - something 
bright to contrast with the black 
background is good. Check that 
'CI' is highlighted in the 'Range' 
bar of the palette menu, click on 
colour 3, click on 'Range' (the cur- 
sor changes to a 'TO' prompt) and 
click on colour 32. 

If you don't use all 30 colours 
in your animation, just end the 
defined range of colours after the 
last colour you do use, and make 
that last colour the one which is 
different from the background. 

Save your new palette, and 
you'll see that only one of your 
balls is visible on screen now. 
Press [Tab] and the whole lot 
should animate for you in a cyclic 
arrangement. What is happening 
is that the one colour which isn't 
black among colours 3 to 32 is 



progressively assigned to each of 
the balls in the sequence in turn, 
giving the illusion of motion. 

You can alter the speed of the 
animation with the 'Speed' slider 
on the palette menu. With a little 
experience you can get sophisti- 
cated effects using this technique. 
David Millard 

DPaint 



Gloucester 

■ Workbench editor adds: a use- 
ful tip when trying to draw 30 
objects, each the same but one 
palette colour on from the last, /s 
to use Deluxe Paint's 'Cycle 
Draw' command. Pick up the 
object as a brush, from the 



Color Palette 



RGB H S V 




I SPREAD I lExlCOPVl 
I RANGE I : 



HEClt^MG 




SPEED 
I CANCEL I I UNDO I 




■ Setting up the palette for the bouncing ball. Only colours 3 to 26 are 
used, so the Range (marked by the white line on the palette) ends after 
number 26. 



84 ■ FORMAT 




TIPS 



'Modes' menu choose 'Cycle'. 
Each time you click to paste the 
brush down it will increment the 
palette colour for you in 
sequence. 

Quick draft 
printing 

Even if you have a printer with 
front button controls which allow 
you to select NLQ print, 12 pitch 
text and so on manually, you will 
find that each time you print a 
document from your word proces- 
sor, the settings are always over- 
ridden by whatever was set up in 
your Preferences. 

You could go into Preferences 
and change the settings, but 
here's a simpler method: set your 
printer up to the typestyle you 
want, using its front panel buttons. 
Assuming it is connected to the 
Amiga via the parallel port, print 
your document by going to the p- 
rogram's Save menu and typing 
par.- as the filename to be saved. 
This sends the text directly to the 
parallel port, ie the printer. You 
may find your line breaks don't 
come out correctly - if your appli- 
cation program has a 'Print to 
Disk' option, use that instead, giv- 
ing PAR: as the disk file name 
again. 

This should work on most pro- 
grams. If you get an 'illegal file- 
name' message or something sim- 
ilar when you save to PAR:, try 
saving to 'PAR:DUMMY' instead - 
that fools programs into believing 
ifs a real filename. 

Incidentally, if you're using the 
standard ED editor to prepare a 
program file, the command sa 

/PAR:/ (Or SA /PRT:/ if you do 

want to go via the printer 
Preferences settings) prints your 
file for you without the need to 
quit ED. 

David Twigg-Flesner, Germany 
and others 

Quick CLI 

If you want to get a quick CLI win- 
dow, rather than booting up your 
Workbench and then running the 
CLI icon, just press [CtrljD repeat- 
edly as soon as the Amiga's start- 
up sequence gets going. 

[CtrOD interrupts the execu- 
tion of any command file (as run 
with the EXECUTE command) so it 
aborts the STARTUP-SEQUENCE 
file before the Workbench can 
load, leaving you with the CLI '1>' 
prompt. 

What's in a 
name? 

There's nothing special about the 
names the Amiga has for its CLI 
commands, they can be anything 



you want. When you type a com- 
mand like DIR at the CLI, the 
Amiga goes away and looks on 
the disk for a file called DIR. If it 
finds one, it runs the program in 
that file. 

Most AmigaDOS commands 
are kept in the C directory of the 
startup disk. So, suppose you are 
used to a CP/M system where the 
command to delete a file is ERA 
(for erase) rather than the usual 
DELETE, no problem: 

Get to the CLI prompt (click 
on the 'CLI' icon in the System 
folder of your startup disk); Type 

CD C 

RENAME DELETE ERA 

and from now on the command 
ERA will delete files for you. You 
can undo the change merely by" 
renaming the file back again. This 
renaming trick works for any of 
the commands whose files are in 
the C or SYSTEM directories. 

Coloured 

prompts 

In the August issue you saw how 
to change the colours of text dis- 
played on screen using ANSI 
escape codes and the ECHO com- 
mand. The same technique can be 
used with the PROMPT command 
for a pleasant effect. At the CLI, 
type: 

PROMPT " + e[ 33; lm%N> 

*e[0m" [Return] 

The '*e' escape codes in this 
string make your CLI prompt 
appear in orange text (the *e[33) 
and emboldened (the lm), and the 
%N turns the prompt into the num- 
ber of the current task, which is 
normal. The *e[0m reverts to 
white for the command line itself. 
This way you get a nice contrast 
between prompts and com- 
mands/responses. 

Finally, here's a challenge to 
knowledgeable Amiga users: what 
is the significance of the 
numbers you get with each 
prompt after a prompt ,,; :;n :j 
r N %n %n..." command? The first 
is obviously the number of the cur- 
rent CLI task, as usual, but the 
rest of the numbers seem to go 
on for ever, some changing others 
not. 

Michael Saunby 
Camberley, Surrey 

■ Workbench editor adds: we're 
puzzled by the extra numbers 
too. Ifs probably a (benign) bug 
in the prompt command, and 
you're seeing a sequence of 
memory locations in the task 
control block. One of the num- 
bers might be the task priority, 
for example. Maybe you could 
write a complete memory editor 



using only the PROMPT com- 
mand? 

Right DIRection 

The DIR command is one of the 
most used CLI commands, dis- 
playing all those files invisible from 
the Workbench icon screen. 

Typing dir gives you a list of 
files and sub-directories in the cur- 
rent directory. However, there are 
three options: 

dir opt a - 'A' is for 'AH'. 
When DIR finds a directory, if the A 
option is in force the Amiga will 
list out all files in that directory, 
and all files in any sub-directories 
too. In other words, all files on the 
disk, from the current level down. 

dir opt d - 'D' is for 
'Directories'. This option lists only 
the directories, not individual file- 
names. 

dir opt i - T is for 
'Interactive'. As the DIR command 
lists each file out in the current 
directory it pauses. Press [Return] 
to carry on to the next file, Q to 
quit back to the CLI, or DEL to 
delete the file (that's typing D-E-L, 
not pressing the [Del] key). Typing 
T will type a text file to the screen. 

These options can be com- 
bined - for instance dir opt ai 
will do an interactive directory of 
all files on the disk. 

Another good tip for using DIR 
is to get the hang of 'pattern 
matching'. A few examples will 
illustrate this best: 

dir er?d - the question 
mark is a 'wildcard' character. 
This command means, "list all files 
with four letters in the name begin- 
ning FR and ending in D, but the 
third letter can be anything at all." 
Files such as FRED, FRID or FR$D 
are listed if they are on the disk. 

A '#' is used to mean "any 
number of the following charac- 
ters", so #? stands for any num- 
ber of any characters: 

dir fred#? - this command 
would list any files beginning with 
FRED, so FREDA, FREDERICK, 
FRED.DOC and plain FRED itself 



Font editor VI, 2 



would all match this, dir fred#? 
opt a will find FRED... files in all 
directories. 

dir #? - This just lists out 
everything, since #? matches all 
filenames. (In fact the DIR com- 
mand by itself lists all files, but the 
#? pattern can be useful in other 
commands, like delete #? to 
delete all your files.) 

A final tip for the impatient. 
Getting a DIR listing can be a slow 
process given the speed of the 
Amiga disk drives. If your disks 
are old, and the data on them is 
consequently very 'fragmented' 
(broken up into small blocks), you 
can speed up disk access by 
FORMATting a fresh disk and 
COPYing all the files onto it. The 
files are written in sequential order 
creating a tidy disk which DIR can 
scan slightly faster. You need two 
disk drives really: if you have an 
A500 and they are called DFO and 
DFl,then 

COPY DFO: TO DEI: ALL 

copies all the files and directories 
for you, from the disk in the inter- 
nal drive to the external drive. 
David Twigg-Flesner 
Gronau, Germany 

Free fonts 

Fancy some extra fonts for exact- 
ly £0.00? Boot up with 'The Very 
First 1 (the guided tour disk provid- 
ed with A500s). As soon as the 
AmigaDOS window appears, tap 
[Ctrl]-D a few times to break into it 
and get a '!>' prompt. Type 
loadwb and then endcli. Now 
put your 'Extras' disk into the drive 
and run the font editor in the tools 
drawer, Fed, replacing 'The Very 
First 1 disk when prompted. You 
can now load the new fonts on 
that disk (use the Project menu on 
the title bar) and resave them to a 
different disk. It is best to save 
them to the 'Fonts' directory of the 
disk you usually start up with, then 
any programs you use will be able 
to read the new fonts. 
Alec Tucker 
Leicester 




FORMAT ■ 85 



^^ "T I FORMAT 



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86 ■ FORMAT 



THIS MAGAZINE IS 
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THE SPECTRUM IS THE 

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FORMAT M 87 




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Superbly detailed simulation of the formula one champi- 
onship. Numerous courses, car preparation, high-speed 
racing, etc. 

Version RRP Our price Order code 

Amiga 24.95 19.95 F0159AM 



r ^ 



A COMPLETELY NEW ANGLE IN COMPUTER FUN 




3C3^ BIONIC COMMANDO 



US Gold 

The Capcom arcade game which sees the fate of the 
world depending on the performance of the warriors of 
bionic power. 

Version RRP Our price Order code 

Atari ST 19.99 15.95 F024ST 

FIRE AND FORGET 

TITUS 

The game of this months demo fromTitus software. 
Version RRP Our price Order code 

Amiga 24.95 19.95 FO305AM 



88 ■ FORMAT 



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Alien Syndrome 

Ace II. 

Action Service 

Arkanoid II 

Barbarian II 

Better Dead Than Alien .. 

Bubble Bobble 

Bombjack 

Buggy Boy 

Combat School 

Crash Garret 

Daley Thompsons 

Empire Strikes Back 

Eliminator 

Elite 



Football Manager II 12 

Cry zor 12. 

Goldrunner II 12, 

Hostage 12, 

1K+ 12 

International Soccer ]2. 

Leathernecks 12 

Living Daylights 12 

\1ach~3 12, 

19 Boot Camp 12 

Operation Wolf 12 

OIDS 12 



Overlander I 

Platoon 1 

Predator 1 

Quadralien 1 

Scrabble Deluxe I 

Super Hang On 1 

-Space Harrier 1 

Summer Olympiad 1 

Thunder Cats I 

Time and Majic I 

Trivial Pursuit 1 

Virus 1 

Where Time Stood Still 1 

Whirligig 12. 

Xenon 

(Army Moves) 12. 

(Skycha.se) 12. 

(Garfield) 12. 

Bionic Commandos 14, 

Games-Winter Edition 14. 

Gauntlet n 14. 

Garry Linnekars Superskills 14 

Great Cnana Sisters 14 

Leaderboard Birdie 14 

Mickey Mouse 14. 

Night Raider 14 

1943 14 

Outrun 14 

Roadblasters 14. 

Street Lighter 14. 

Zynaps 14 

Captain Blood 15, 

Carrier Command 15. 

Corrupton 15. 



Driller 15.95 

Dungeon Master 15.95 

Rsfl. 15.95 

Fernandez Must Die 15.95 

Legend of the Sword 15.95 

Project Stealth Eighter 15.95 

Shadowgaie 15.95 

ST 5 Star 15.95 

Starray 15.95 

Star Glider II 15.95 

Uninvited 15.95 

LMS 15.95 

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Verminator 

Bards Talc 

Heroes of the Lance (D&D) .. 

Pools of Radiance (D&D) 

Rocket Ranger 



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Atari 520STEM 279.95 

Atari 520 Super Pack 279.95 

lnc-21 Games + 279.95 

Business Organiser 279.95 

Data base /Spread sheet 279.95 

Wordproeessor/Diary 369.95 

Atari 1040STFM 459.95 

Atari SMM804 459.95 

Dot Matrix Primer 179.95 

Atari SCI 224 Med Res 179.95 

Colour Monitor 369.95 

Buy Your Computer with a Monitor and save £1(X).(X) 

Cumana 1 Meg Drive ST 99.95 

Amiga MX) 369.95 

Amiga 500 + 1084 369.95 

Colour Monitor 599.95 

Amiga 500 Business 599.95 

Pack inc- 599.95 

10S4 Colour Monitor 599.95 

Citizen 120D Printer 
The Works- 
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+ PC Emulator 769. 

10S4 Colour Monitor 329. 

Citizen 120D Printer 229 

Cumana 1 Meg Drive Amiga 99 

Amiga Memory Expansion to I Meg + Clock Card 119 

10 3 1/2 inch Blank Discs 9. 

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Alien Syndrome 

Barbarian 11 

Better Dead Than Alien . 

Bubble Bobble 

Crash Garret 

Empire Strikes Back 

Elite 

Football Manager 11 



International Soccer 

Leatherneck 

Living Daylights 

Mach3 ......... 

19 Boot Camp 

Powcrplay 

Peter Beardsley 

Return to Genesis 

Seminal 

Sky Chase 

Summer Olympiad 

Time and Magik 

Verminator 

Virus 

Whirligig 

Xenon 

Army Moves 

Bomb Jack 

Birdie Leaderboard 

Combat School 

Carrier Command 

Corruption 

Daley Thompsons 

Dungeon Master 

ECO 

Eliminator 

Pish 

Fernandez Must Die 

Fire and Forget 

Goldrunner 1 or 2 

Hum lor the Red October.. 

Ikari Warriors 

Legend of the Sword 

Mind Fighter 

Obliterator 

Overlander 

Platoon 

Quadralien 

Sargon Ml 

Shadowgaie 

Space Harrier 

Strike Force Harrier 

Starray 

Star Glider II 

Thundercats 

LMS 



Wizzball 

Where Time Stood Still . 

Bionic Commandos 

BairdsTale 1 or II 

Great Giana Sisters 

Ferrari Formula 1 

Impossible Mission II .... 

Interceptor 

Jinxicr 

Night Raider 

1943 

Road Blasters 

Street Fighter 

Test Drive 

Wizard Warz 

Rocket Ranger 



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GOLD 
DUST 



Yo, Uncle Sam! What's with the brain drain from Atari US? Why is 
everyone resigning? And why is the Amiga A2000 a turkey to PC 
users? Steve Gold posts another monthly despatch on the American 



First details of Atari's new 
TOS for the ST series have 
now been released. The 
developer's version of TOS comes 
supplied on disk, but despite my 
enthusiastic comments in last 
month's column, it now looks like 
if II be the beginning of 1989 
before we see the new TOS avail- 
able on this side of the Atlantic. 

The product looks to be well 
worth waiting for, however. New 
on the scene for most users is the 
provision of a neat disk cache utili- 
ty that should speed disk opera- 
tion up all round. 

The bad news is that the 
Mega ST equipped with 4Mb 
seems to be causing problems 
with beta test versions of the new 
TOS. This appears to be due to 




the new operating system allow- 
ing programs to access system 
RAM slightly higher than 4Mb, with 
the result that at the moment the 
machine crashes. 

The good news is that the 
new TOS's features are a great 
improvement on existing versions. 
Major improvements include: bet- 
ter compatibility with IBM PC disk 
formats (watch out for some new 
PC emulator packages for the ST 
in '89), GEM programs can now 
be auto-booted from disk, and file 
copying on a single floppy system 
now uses all available memory for 
buffer purposes. 

Talking of PC compatibility, 
the new TOS allows a soft reset of 
the ST to be carried out using 
(you guessed it) a [ControlHAIt]- 
[Delete] key combination. Mind 



you, if using PC-style commands 
to reboot the machine is a fore- 
taste of things to come with the 
new TOS, some ST users might 
be considering it as a retrograde 
step! 

Going, gone 

Talking of retrograde steps, 
sources in the US suggest that 
the 68030 add-on unit for the ST, 
currently still under development 
(it may yet see the light of day as 
a separate machine) is not 
capable of multi-tasking. 

Since the primary reason for 
using a 68030 microprocessor on 
other machines and workstations 
is due to the chip's sheer power 
and capacity for multi-tasking, this 
has to be a mistake (I hope). 

There's no mistake, however, 
in reports that Neil Harris, top 
technical guru with Atari for the 
past four years, has now left the 
company. Neil left a sad message 
on several online systems in the 
US during late September, telling 
everyone that he'd had enough of 
the company. 

Reports suggest he had just 
two hours to clear his desk and 
vacate the building after he ten- 
dered his resignation. The good 
news is that Neil has joined Genie, 
the Washington-based online ser- 
vice, to act as a technical advisor 
for Amiga and ST online services. 

Gone too is Jim Eisenberg, 
one of the two people who 
worked on the design of the ST. 
Details of Eisenberg's departure 
from the company, and his where- 
abouts today, have not been publi- 
cised. 

Virus news 

Things are pretty quiet on the 
Amiga front this month, with little 
real development from 

Commodore itself. The add-ons 
and Amiga-relevant third parties 
continue to provide the Amiga 
user base with some interesting 



products, however. 

Compute.' magazine's books 
division has just released a book 
called Computer Viruses. The 
$14-95 book details most known 
viruses on the Amiga, as well as 
on a number of other machines 
(the Atari ST included). 

Unlike other books on the 
subject, however, Computer 
Viruses contains technical infor- 
mation on how the viruses attack 
the Amiga's operating system, 
and simple steps to prevent a 
virus taking hold on your machine, 
as well as sources of virus protec- 
tion packages. 

Computer Viruses is written 
by Ralph Roberts, the author of 
Computers Using Turbo Basic and 
Using Borland Sprint. Computer 




Viruses should be available from 
import booksellers in the UK. 
Order using the book's ISBN num- 
ber (0-87455-178-1). In case of 
difficulty, call 0101-704-254-3972 
or write to Ralph Roberts, PO Box 
8459, Asheville, NC 28814 in the 
US. 



A dodo, ATually 

Back on the Amiga hardware 
front, sources on CompuServe 
suggest that the long-awaited 
80286 AT-bridge board for the 
Amiga may be out in its final form 
by the end of the year. The bad 
news is that, according to those 
online Amiga users who've seen 
the board, it's going to very 
expensive. 

Several members of the 
CompuServe Amiga Developer's 
SIG who've been waiting patiently 
for the AT-compatible bridge 
board have now given up on wait- 
ing, and bought an 80286-based 
PC for around the £500 mark. 

Since both machines can be 
linked using a 25-way serial cable, 
this may be a cheaper option than 
going for the Amiga plug-in card. 
The attraction of the Amiga 2000 
as a PC stand-in seems to be wan- 
ing in the US. I wonder how many 
Amiga 2000's have been sold in 
the UK to potential PC users - not 
many, I suspect. 

■ 'Gold Dust' is compiled from 
the US online services by Steve 
Gold, a freelance journalist spe- 
cialising in computer communica- 
tions. Email, industry tips and 
comments are welcomed on 
Telecom Gold 72:MAG066 or via 
the US E-mail networks: 
CompuServe 76011, 1155, 
SGOLD (BIX & CIX), and The 
Source on 1P2009. 



HAMMING IT UP 



For those Amiga users who are Radio Amateurs, the Amigan Beacon 
Club has opened up for business on CompuServe's Amiga 
Development special interest group (SIG). The club has more than 
210 members at the time of writing, including Amiga users from 11 
countries, many of them in Europe. 

In the UK, Bob Wellbeloved (G3LMH, 8 Orchard Close, South 
Wonston, Winchester S021 3EY) is maintaining a UK database of 
information on using the Amiga in tandem with a radio transceiver. 
Bob has started a UK Amigan Beacon newsletter - it's worth contact- 
ing him direct, if you're into packet radio on your Amiga. 



FORMAT ■ 91 



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Action Service 12.99 12.99 

International Karate+ 12.99 12.99 

Star Ray 15.99 15.99 

D Thompson Olympic C . 12.99 15.99 

Netherworld 12.99 12.99 

Super Hang-On 12.99 - 

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StarGoose 12.99 12.99 

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Chronoquest 18.99 18.99 

Hostages 15.99 15.99 

Stargliderll 15.99 15.99 

Zoom 12.99 12.99 

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FORMAT 
LETTERS 



What an organised lot you are. Questions numbered one to ten in 
nearly every letter. No matter, keep them coming to: FORMAT 
LETTERS, ST AMIGA FORMAT, 4 QUEEN STREET, BATH BA1 1EJ. 



Benchmark low 
marks 

Various benchmarks were includ- 
ed in the September and October 
1988 issues of ST/Amiga Format 
which may have misled your read- 
ers, and we would be grateful for 
some space to discuss these 
benchmarks. 

The benchmarks on page 24 
of the September issue have seri- 
ous flaws; two of the file handling 
benchmarks printed 'start' before 
opening the files, three printed it 
afterwards, and the same two 
printed 'End' after the files were 
closed, the other three printing it 
before the close. This meant that 
the times were unfair on ST BASIC 
and GFA BASIC since there was 
no consistency as to when timing 
started and when it stopped. 
Some languages may read in 
most of the file on the OPEN 
whilst others may even postpone 
the OPEN until the first READ or 
WRITE, meaning that you should 
always start timing before the 
OPEN and stop timing after the 
CLOSE. Incidentally, Power BASIC 
runs this benchmark, with the tim- 
ings outside the OPEN. .CLOSE, in 
76s, with a compile time to disc 
of 16s (instant to memory or RAM 
disk) and a code size of 9.6K. 
Lattice C is so fast because it 
uses macros. 

Regarding the Pi-calculation 
benchmark used on page 32 of 
the True BASIC review in the 
October issue and in the 
September issue, the expression 
DO WHILE i< 100000 is treated 
differently in various BASICS. In a 
modern Microsoft-compatible 
BASIC (like Power BASIC) the eval- 
uation of i< 100000 is done using 
double-precision (16 digit) arith- 
metic since this is necessary for 
full accuracy when comparing a 
single-precision real with a long 
integer. This involves conversion 
of both i and 100000 to double 
precision numbers and a relatively 
slow comparison operation. In 



contrast, GFA BASIC uses 11-digit 
arithmetic throughout since this is 
all that it has at its disposal. 

Thus, you can dramatically 
speed up Power BASIC'S perfor- 
mance on this benchmark by sim- 
ply forcing a single-precision com- 
parison with DO WHILE i<l 00000! 
(the ! forces 100000 to single-pre- 
cision which is what we want 
because we are using integers 
and don't care about great accu- 
racy). When this change is made 
the timing for Power BASIC 
comes down from 24s to 10s 
whilst GFA's time remains the 
same. 

Benchmarks are always con- 
troversial but a least try to com- 
pare like with like and make them 
as similar as possible under all 
languages. Interested readers 
may wish to log on to CIX and 
read some of the PCW/ 
Benchmarks conference which is 
very informative but somewhat 
lengthy. 

Thanks for a useful and infor- 
mative magazine but please, 
please try to be consistent, accu- 
rate and fair with benchmarks in 
future. 
David Link 
HiSoft 
Bedford 

■ It's a fair cop, Guv... at least 
your first point concerning file 
handling. Unfortunately different 
members of staff set up and ran 
our benchmarks on the various 
compilers. That's no reason for 
missing the discrepancies 
between the listings, though. 

Your second point, regarding 
the precision of comparative 
tests, is interesting but we feel 
our test of the exact same loop 
structure across all dialects of 
the language is valid. How a par- 
ticular implementation handles 
variables internally is really not of 
concern to most programmers. 
While we accept that Power BASIC 
may well be more accurate than, 



say GFA, in this area, we were 
testing the speed of execution, 
not the precision. Your point 
would have more weight if men- 
tion of the use of T to force sin- 
gle-precision comparison and 
hence increase the speed of exe- 
cution was included in a 'Hints 
and Tips' section of your other- 
wise high-grade manual. 

Book case 

I have a small MIDI set up and the 
last acquisition was Tigress' 
Patchbox 32 for the Roland 
MT32. I was very disappointed 
with the difficulty of actually using 
it in a practical way. This was 
entirely due to some basic omis- 
sions in the manual. I spent an 
enormous amount of time trying 
to come to terms with it and even- 
tually wrote the enclosed letter to 
Tigress. 

I pretty well expected no reply 
and that's exactly what I got. 
Perhaps the tone of my letter 
should have been a little softer 
but I don't honestly think it would 
have made any difference and the 
facts as stated are correct. It 
would be so easy for them to 
rewrite, with one or two important 
additions, which would make a 
huge difference to the new user. 
As it is, I have completely given 
up attempting to use PB32 and 
this is a great shame because I 
think it is probably capable of 
doing anything that could be 
required of it. 

I use Iconix on an Atari 520. 
The most valuable information 
would include practical advice on 
how to connect everything togeth- 
er in a useable system. It seems 
to me that at some point it might 
be necessary to unplug some 
MIDI connections with the units 
still turned on, which is definitely 
not a good idea. It would be inter- 
esting to see if there is an easy 
way out of that. 

I might add that the problem 
of manual writers being incapable 



of envisaging the difficulties of 
new users is amazingly common 
and is easily solved by letting 
such a new user rewrite the manu- 
al. 

J.A.Trott 
Coleraine 
Co Londonderry 
N. Ireland 

■ This letter, of which only a sec- 
tion is reproduced here, high- 
lights a common problem with all 
kinds of software and hardware. 
It is certainly true that many com- 
panies leave the documentation 
of their products to a late stage 
in the manufacture and are then 
surprised when the manuals are 
criticised as being 'rushed'. 

in the software and hardware 
companies' defence, though, a 
manual which is acceptable to 
the first time user and to the sea- 
soned enthusiast is a rare animal 
(a bit like a three-banded armadil- 
lo, but not as easy on the eye). 
It's a pity more companies can't 
afford to employ professional 
writers for their manuals, as they 
employ professional program- 
mers for their programs. 
Perhaps Tigress would like to 
comment on Mr Trott's particular 
problems. 

Bridgeboard 
of sighs 

I have an Amiga 2000 with 3Mb 
RAM, two internal 3" disk drives, 
and the A2088 Bridgeboard. What 
do I need in order to -be able to 
load and run IBM-PC XT programs 
on the A2010 3.5" internal disk 
drive, device DF1, and save/foad 
file data on the Bridgeboard's 
5.25" disc drive, device A?, such 
as being able to put an IBM 3.5" 
disk with the WordStar word pro- 
cessor program on it into DF1, 
run the program, and then 
save/load the document on the 
Bridgeboard's 5.25" disk drive. 
Also how can I copy IBM (MSDOS) 
files back and forth between the 



FORMAT M 93 




A pirate speaks 

I thought I would write to put the definitive argument for software 
'piracy'. Firstly, the mistake many program swappers make is giving 
ground to the anti-piracy whingers. We all know the argument about 
destroying the software industry (yawn). There is only one word for 
that: 'flannel'. Whether a company is a large or small one, the incen- 
tive is the same - PROFIT. 
My incentive is as justifi- 
able, I also want to profit 
by my activities. When 
things are looked at from 
my point of view, it can be 
shown that I have the more 
valid and ethical argu- 
ments. Once again, before 
the whingers pitch in, I am 
an ethical individual, I 
recognise right and wrong 
when I see it, not when I'm 
told to see it. 

My needs are more 
important than some face- 
less fat cat sitting around 
waiting for the profit/royal- 
ties to come pouring in. To 
be honest, I do not give a 
toss how much time or 
effort he/she puts into 
their product. Do they care 
how little money I earn and 
how little I can afford their 
inflated prices. 

You may think that this 
is just the selfish comment 
of a disagreeable ******. 
If so then I refute that, 
whilst you are building up a 
righteous indignation, try 
to extend your imagination 
to cover more than the superficial arguments created by the comput- 
er media. I believe they have a vested interest in the high price of 
products, for do they not also gain by the increased expenditure of 
glossy (and unnecessary) adverts? 
Frank Doddy 
Hull 

■ Despite all your rhetoric, I can't see any 'definitive argument'. 
Your main point seems to be that the software companies/authors 
earn a lot more than you. Perhaps if you took the time to acquire 
the skills and put in the effort that's needed to write a piece of com- 
mercial software, you would appreciate how few 'fat cats' there are 
around. Theft is theft, whether it's software, TVs or cars, and no 
amount of whinging is going to change that fact. 




Du 0V1 -sacr <yAV snu_ And U5s€ k 

Cf ThWGS PG£ * CHRU6E ■ " 



Amiga's DF1 drive and the 

Bridgeboard's 5.25" drive? I've 

tried setting up a virtual drive on 

DF1 but to no avail. 

Mark Goodrich 

RAF Bentwaters 

Suffolk 

■ WeVe been trying to obtain a 
Bridgeboard from Commodore 
for review for something over 
three months, now, so our reply 
will of necessity be based on 
what we imagine to be the case. 
Assuming the Bridgeboard acts 
through the hardware of the 
Amiga, there should be no prob- 
lem in saving text files to the 
internal drive, though they will be 
saved in AmigaDos format rather 



than MS-DOS. As far as we 
understand it, the Bridgeboard 
can't cope with writing to the 
internal drive in MS-DOS format 
(due to the multi-tasking require- 
ments of the machine). 



I can't get no 
satisfaction 

I have on ST FM (the old type with 
a half megabyte drive). I got it for 
Christmas last year believing that 
for a bargain price of £299 I had 
got a fantastic computer that I 
could learn BASIC on without the 
fear of it being phased out in 
place of a better computer for at 
least a couple of years. In reality I 
had brought £300 worth of com- 



puter with a language disk with 
just a running guide. 

At first I was annoyed at not 
getting a programming book, but 
soon I was forced to buy one for 
£13.95. It was then I discovered 
how slow and useless Atari BASIC 
is. I just couldn't do anything with 
it and soon gave up. My parents 
seeing my depression went out 
and brought Fast BASIC for 
£49.95, but this just confused me 
more. I even joined their user's 
club, but it didn't help much . Now 
after 9 months I have about 7 
games, am almost bankrupt but 
still don't understand any form of 
BASIC and to make it worse still, 
what do Atari go and do, they put 
a 1 meg drive in a new ST and I 
hear that Atari are going to drop 
their price back to £299. I'm pig 
sick Atari conned me and thou- 
sands of others into buying their 
computer, and now we have been 
stabbed in the back. I'm now con- 
sidering selling my ST etc (at a 
big loss) to buy an Amiga but I've 
been saving for ages, and how 
can I be sure that Commodore 
won't do the same as Atari? 

I'm all for improving comput- 
ers but why can't computer com- 
panies do a deal with owners of 
their products a) to replace out- 
moded systems or b) to offer dis- 
counted updating of existing com- 
puters. I know it is said that this is 
impractical or rather said to be, 
but why should people like myself 
be sold down the river by Atari like 
we have been. OK, you might say 
that the situation isn't as bad as I 
make out but how long before 
enough new ST's are sold before 
software firms switch to making 
games to take advantage of the 1 
Mb drive. And OK so computer 
companies are out to make a prof- 
it but out of those profits can't 
they at least play fair with existing 
owners. 
Darren Beck 
Welling 
Kent 

■ / really can't see why you're 
pig sick. You still have a very 
decent computer with a good 
BASIC. You can't really blame 
Atari and Computer Concepts for 
your difficulties learning to pro- 
gram. Have you followed our 
Learn BASIC series - that's a 
third avenue for you. 

It really is unreasonable to 
expect Atari, or any other com- 
puter company, to provide all 
existing users with upgrade paths 
when they release new versions 
of their hardware. You wouldn't 
expect to have your Hi-Fi, TV or 
w'deo upgraded, so what's so 
special about a micro? You can 
get a double-sided drive fitted to 
an ST - ask your dealer. 



Software companies are also in 
business to make money, so it'll 
be a long time before they aban- 
don the single-sided format still 
used by the majority of STs. 

The right 
connection 

I am the proud owner of an Atari 
520STFM and am desperately try- 
ing to find out how to plug my 
computer into my amplifier of my 
hi-fi system. Please could you help 
me! 

Wayne Harris 
Oxford 

■ You need a product called 
Monitor Master, available from 
Bath's very own, dear 'Bath 
Computer Shack' (0225 310300) 
at £35. This provides separate 
phono outputs for connection to 
an amplifier, and also lets you 
switch between two monitors. If 
this is too expensive, see Issue 
3's Desktop, which explains how 
to fiddle two wires out of the 
monitor socket and connect 
them straight into a speaker. 

Boring 
questions 

Today was incredibly boring (well 
at least this bit is anyway) so I 
decided to write to an intelligent 
informative incredibly good maga- 
zine. Guess what, I wrote to you 
instead. 

Down to serious business 
now. Since I am a simple, basic 
person, I will ask simple basic 
questions 

1. Can you connect the ST 
straight into the telly? 

2. Wossalidis about two deals of 
the ST and what are de udder 
games with it? 

3. Why can't I think of another 
question? 

4. is a mouse that useful? 

5. Does the Leathernecks 4-player 
extension work, with just 2 joy- 
sticks plugged in? 

Raymond 
Limerick 
Eire 

■ 1. Any ST model with FM after 
its number includes a modulator 
and can be plugged directly into 
a TV. 

2. The 520ST is currently avail- 
able in two guises - on its own 
for £299 or with a selection of 
22 games and an 'organiser' 
GEM program for £399. The 
games are: 
Marble Madness 
Test Drive 

Beyond the Ice Palace 
Buggy Boy 

Eddie Edwards Super Ski 
Ikari Warriors 
Thundercats 



94 ■ FORMAT 




Ranarama 
Zynaps 
Quadralien 
Starquake 
Chopper X 
Roadwars 
Xenon 
Arkanoid II 
Wizball 
Black Lamp 
Genesis 
Thrust 

Seconds Out 
Summer Olympiad 
Return to Genesis 
3. 1 bet you can. 

4. Yes, if you ever do any draw- 
ing, painting or DTP. 

5. Ves. 



Bias tracking 

In your first three issues, out of 
23 games reviewed, you have 
managed to find 5 that are Amiga 
only and only 2 that are ST only. 
This amounts to some 21%, and 
as you well know, is totally misrep- 
resentative. So far, you haven't 
reviewed a single game of the 
increasing number that are now 
£5 dearer than on the Amiga, 
you've misinformed us about 
Arkanoid II - it's not coming out 
on the Amiga and would have 



been £5 dearer anyway, not 
£19.95 as you stated, the official 
advert was only 2 pages away 
form your review!! 

If it's your intention to pro- 
mote the Amiga and belittle the 
ST, there's no need to be so devi- 
ous. If you think ST owners will be 
happy with this misrepresentation 
you are sadly mistaken. 

I read the majority of the com- 
puter press and all the indepen- 
dent sources I've seen say there 
are at least 125,000 ST's and 
about 25,000 Amigas in this 
country. Who's your independent 
source, a jealous Amiga dealer. 

If you continue to bend over 
backwards to appease Amiga 
owners you'll surely lose all your 
ST customers. By trying to hide 
the truth you are doing nobody 
any good especially yourselves. 
RJ Lattimore 
Havant 

■ Oh, come on. Don't be so 
petty. Every magazine makes the 
occasional pricing mistake, and 
according to our information 
Arkanoid 2 wjjl come out on the 
Amiga. More and more games 
companies are releasing ST and 
Amiga games at the same price, 
which is what's reflected in the 



No balls 

Why is our other national game, cricket, so rarely implemented on a 
computer and these days not at all? I remember about three ver- 
sions written for the Spectrum, all pretty dire (with the grudging 
exception of CRL's Test Match), both in graphics and gameplay, and 
these days quite unacceptable. One can only imagine what 16 bits 
and half a megabyte could do for a cricket simulation. In fact, it 
might turn out to be the only way to beat the West Indies. 

There must be a programmer out there who is also a cricket 
fan! Where is he/she, for the love of Botham? I cannot believe that a 
decent cricket game would 
not be greeted with wild 
enthusiasm by British ST 
and Amiga owners. The 
basic rules and structure 
of cricket would translate 
easily enough to computer 
code. (Child's play com- 
pared to Carrier 
Command, surely?) 
although integrating a 
credible gameplay with 
realistic graphics might 
prove tricky. So please, 
you software houses, fill 
this glaring gap in the 16 
bit marketplace and 
restore our national pride 
at the same time. Failing 
this, all readers should 
write to their MP or this 
magazine. 
R Alexander 
London 




t* ^fou niuu Q6t Tc iVi-iisJ& Tht WEST ^Di£S . " 



■ Please make that your 
MP and NOT this maga- 
zine. 



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Join the Cub 

After having read your reply to Mr Deitch's letter in the September 
issue of your (incredible) magazine I thought that I must point out 
that I, like Mr Deitch, upgraded from a BBC to an ST and, not being 
able to afford another monitor, decided to use my Microvitec Cub. 
after much experimentation and burnt fingers, I found that it is possi- 
ble to convert a standard TTL input Cub into an analog input. 

All that is needed is to remove the back of the monitor. On the 
left hand side of the case near the back is a row of links which 
should look like those in Figure 1. Moving these to the positions in 
Figure 2 will make the monitor accept analog input. As for the audio 
on the Atari, I simply use the Hi-Fi that I used for my BBC's Music 
500 which gives adequate output (40 watts!) The pin connectors for 
the Atari monitor connector are also shown. 13 pin DIN connections 
for the Atari monitor can be obtained from: VIDEX, 26 Queensbury 
Station Parade, Edgware, Middx HA8 5NR. 
J Heath 
Keele 

■ Microvitec say that this modification is possible with most mod- 
els of their Cub range of monitors, though very early models (circa 
1980/81) may not have the links available. Look for a circuit board 
labelled LCCD03 and for plug PL103. This is the link described by 
Mr Heath. 



reviews. You believe whatever 
sales figures you want, but your 
Amiga figure is way low. 

Speech, speech 

Could you please suggest a good 
(but not too expensive) assembler 
for the ST, and a good (but not 
too expensive) sprite designer 
which is compatible. Also, as a 
point of interest, on the BBC 'B' 
there was a very good speech 
synthesis program running in the 
machine's 32K. It makes you won- 
der why no ST games have such a 
feature, seeing the amount of 
memory which is often left unused 
- it would make an ST version of 
Mortville Manor just the same as 
the Amiga. 
James Broad 
Oxford 

■ HiSoft's DevPac ST and K-Seka 



from Kuma, among others, are 
good assemblers at modest 
prices. Superior Software's 
Speech program for the BBC 
Micro, which you mention, is real- 
ly not in the same league as that 
used in Mortville Manor. You can 
understand the one in Mortville, 
for a start. 



Simple soul 

I do like your mag and I am forev- 
er picking it up, one thing I find a 
bit annoying though is you write 
your mag as thought everyone 
knows what you are talking about, 
you haven't made much allowance 
for the complete beginner like 
myself. Even the manual which 
came with the Amiga was of very 
little help. I thought the manual of 
the C64 was bad enough but this 
was no help and seeing as this 



FORMAT ■ 95 




Mail order 
mayhem 

The reason I am writing to you is to complain about a software mail 
order company and the situation in which I find myself. 

I have owned an Atari ST for almost a year now and have been 
thoroughly pleased with the computer. Like most users of 16 bit 
computers I find the price of software rather high, particularly in 
comparison to 8 bit computers. I tend to buy software by mail order 
from adverts in computer magazines. I feel those stores provide an 
essential service as, not only do they provide software at a reduced 
price, but also make buying programs easy for those amongst us 
who may be disabled, or live in a small community and do not have 
access to computer stores. This leads me to write with my own 
problem. 

In October 1987 
I saw a review for the 
game Renegade by 
Imagine in a comput- 
er magazine which 
heartily recommend- 
ed the game. Also in 
the magazine was an 
advert for MailSoft of 
PO Box 589 London 
N15 6JJ, in which the 
Atari ST version of 
Renegade was on 
offer for £13.95. On 
the 28th October 
1987 I sent off an 
order to MailSoft, 
enclosing a cheque 
for £13.95, dated 
28th October 1987 
and made payable to 
MailSoft. In mid 
November 1987 I 
received a bank 
statement showing 
that the above men- 
tioned cheque had 
been cashed and 
cleared on 5th 
November 1987. I 
then sat and waited. 

By March 1988 I 
was getting tired of 
waiting so I wrote to 
MailSoft asking for a 
refund. I received no 
reply to that letter but decided to wait a while longer. 

In early August I became aware that the Atari ST version of 
Renegade was on general sale, so expected to receive my copy at 
any moment. By 18th August I had still heard nothing, so decided to 
write to them asking either for a full refund, a copy of Renegade or 
for them to contact me and explain why they had not contacted me 
sooner. 

At this time I have still heard nothing from MailSoft, so I am writ- 
ing to you for advice. I have copies of the letters written to MailSoft 
and also have both the cheque book stub and the bank statement 
showing when the cheque was cashed. 
John Belt 
Hull 

■ You really have left it an awfully long time before taking any 
action. Mail order companies are bound by law to display a full 
address in magazine advertisements, not just a PO box number, so 
the company looks suspect As they've refused to reply to a series 
of letters, and presumably you have no telephone number for them, 
your only other recourse is an approach to the magazine con- 
cerned, who may be able to furnish more details. There are many 
suppliers more local to Hull than MailSoft, any of whom would be 
likely to have copies of Renegade. 




CDM£ DOHs.' TO SoCt THtr-t CUT f f\C£ TO f fiCE i 1 " 



was my first disk drive on the 
A500 I feel that I need some help. 
So now, here are a few questions 
that I need help with; I will be get- 
ting my new A500 soon so I want 
to be ready for it. 

1. If you write your own program 
and transfer it to disk, if the disk 
is only half full, how do you record 
onto the disk after the first pro- 
gram? 

2. I received the golf game 
'Leader Board' with my A500. The 
instructions to load said to load 
my 'Kickstarf and then the game. 
I didn't get anything called a 
'Kickstarf and even with the 
'Workbench' I still couldn't load the 
game. In fact, it said somewhere 
to initialize the game. I did as 
directed by the A500 and blanked 
my master disk before I had the 
chance to copy it. 

3. I had great trouble trying to 
copy your free disks, in fact, I 
couldn't, the computer flashed 
that it couldn't read, is this 
because they are for ST and 
Amiga? I had no trouble just load- 
ing the disk but I had trouble try- 
ing to run Vilbm from disk 2; in 
fact, I couldn't run it. 

4. I tried to run 'Disk Doctor' not 
for any particular reason, but the 
A500 didn't know what I was talk- 
ing about. 

5. What do you mean when you 
say 'Boot Out? 

6. Is there a decent book that I 
could purchase that would help a 
thicky like myself? And a book with 
some sample programs that I 
could type in so as to give me 
some idea what a program looks 
like. 

I would appreciate your help 
with these problems. Please con- 
tinue with your super mag and 
good luck for a long and success- 
ful publication. 
Mr M Bell 
Brentwood 

■ We do try and cater for all lev- 
els of experience within Format 
Perhaps these answers will help: 

1. You're still thinking in 'cassette 
mode'. Disk drives store data ail 
over the disk's surface. You don't 
have Ao worry about where the 
file is physically recorded - that's 
all handled by the disk operating 
system. 

2. Kickstart is a program which 
is stored in ROM on an A500, so 
you needn't worry about loading 
it - it's already there. Leader 
Board starts without loading any- 
thing. You use it as you would 
your Workbench disk. 

3. You won't be able to copy all 
the files from the cover disk in 
one go, due to the special for- 
mat, but you should have no trou- 
ble copying file by file. Follow the 



instructions in the Disk Extra sec- 
tion of the magazine. 

4. Disk Doctor is a file on the 
Workbench disk, but can only be 
operated from the CLI, not the 
Workbench icon screen. Unless 
your Amiga suggests running 
Disk Doctor over a suspect disk, 
it's safest not to use it 

5. The term is normally 'boot up' 
and simply means to start up 
your computer in the normal way. 

6. Amiga specific books are fairly 
thin on the ground, but you could 
try 'The Amiga System' available 
from Precision Software 101-330 
7166). 



PD? 

At present, I am attempting to set 
up a Public Domain software 
library for the Atari ST and was 
wondering whether the ST part of 
your cover disk may be distribut- 
ed as PD. Full acknowledgment of 
your magazine would be included 
on the disk. If you wish it could be 
offered as a Shareware disk. 

Also might I suggest that you 
devote a page or two to reviews 
on Public Domain software and 
suppliers. This could also include 
inviting suppliers to prepare a file 
of their catalogue for the cover 
disk. 

Tobias Van Vredenburgh 
London 

■ Anything marked as 'public 
domain' on the Disk Extra pages 
can be freely redistributed. 
However, increasingly the ST 
part of the cover disk is mainly 
copyright to the readers who 
have written the programs and 
sent them in. If you have any spe- 
cific requests for permission, 
send them to us and we will pass 
them on to the authors. We do 
regular PD updates in Format. 

lOOO and 1.1 

You cannot guarantee that your 
free disks will run on Amiga 
A1000, you say. So perhaps I can 
help you by advising that there 
should be no problem if A1000 
owners uses VI. 2 of Kickstart and 
Workbench. Both these are on 
disk with the A1000, which has no 
Kickstart on ROM, so it is possible 
to upgrade from the versions 1.1 
supplied with new AlOOO's. Also 
of course, it will be easier for 
A1000 owners, like myself, to 
upgrade soon to 1.3 versions! 
Michael Kingston 
Bristol 



■ They should be available from 
Commodore dealers as and when 
the new versions are finally 
released. 



96 ■ FORMAT 




Call that a 

boomerang? 

This is either one hell of a spoof, 
or the Aussies really are as macho 
and fun loving as Paul Hogan 
would have us believe. Just when 
the last 20 years of arty films 
have almost convinced us of the 
average Australian's thirst for cul- 
ture and the finer things in life, 
Boomeraid bounces back with all 
the old corked hat expletive jokes 
that should have gone out like the 
lifeguards on Bondi beach. 

The game is based around a 
Bushman- style vigilante wander- 
ing round the suburbs of Sydney 
bopping off the scum of the big 




Issue 6 of ST 
Amiga Format 
storms down the ; 
road on Thursday 
17th November — 
hitch a lift now. 



V. 



city with a boomerang. Sounds 
plausible? Well the program is 
actually designed to teach basic 
geometry, as before you wang 
your rang at the mugger you have 
to determine the slope and inter- 
cept of the straight line that will 
connect the two. If this is not 
enough, our hero utters lines like 
"Strewth" and "Stone the crows" 
periodically. 

The game comes complete 
with catalogues and order forms 
for boomerangs and bush hats. 
Corks an optional extra. 

Disk Virus? 

Panic! It would appear that some 
copies of ST Amiga Format went 
out last month with a virus on the 
disk. No, sorry, not a virus, the 
Virus. A few puzzled readers, not 
quite knowing whether to believe 
their luck, rang in to report that 
their cover disk appeared to con- 
tain a complete version of the 
then-unreleased Amiga version of 
Firebird's Wrus, the game that 
topped the ST charts. 

If only it was deliberate! It'd be 
a great marketing ploy - "Every 
month we're giving away a few 
free complete games, but you 
won't know whether your copy has 
got one until you buy it!" No, it 
seems that Firebird and Format 
share the same disk duplicators, 
and a very few pre-production 
samples of Virus got mixed up 
with the Format cover disk pile. 

If you have Virus and you'd 
rather have the Format cover disk 
(Whaddayamean? Of course you 
would), just return it to DisCopy 
labs at the address given on the 
back of this month's disk card. 



Show Me 

The 1988 PC Show used more 
hype than ever to sell rather less 
new product than usual. The Psion 
Organiser, beloved of Marks and 
Spencer stock-checkers and yup- 
pies with BIG pockets, was there 
in force. The tie up with M & S 
obviously goes deeper than at 
first imagined. Judging by their 
stand (pictured), it seems a deal 
has secured many hundreds of 
the fat calculators against a job 
lot of used mannikins and the 
loudest jump suits ever sold by 
the clothing multiple. 

Not content with micros 
bulging from every corner of their 
stand, Toshiba chained one of 
their executives to a table oppo- 
site the tube station and ordered 
him to look busy with one of their 
laptops for five days. Judging by 
this shot, he failed fairly early on. 
"Hello Tosh" jokes were not appre- 
ciated. 








* 1 

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I, 





Superheroes. inc. 

by ~ 



)y Sarkar 




Tdf Z&LOMAT*tX.<A'gA#. ^pgcoHfvrat 8oP$... 



98 ■ FORMAT 



ADVERTISERS INDEX 



16 Bit Centre 65 

A-Z Computers 28 

Adamsoft 66 

Alpha Computing 65 

Amiga PD 97 

Anco IBC 

Apalonia 63 

Artan 61 

Athene 65 

BBD Dust Covers 97 

Byteback 65 

Byteware 19 

CBS 42 

Castle Computers 79 

Chips 30 

Clik 9 

Computer Trading 76 

Cut Price Software 23 

Datel 2-3 

Eazi-Print 46 

Electronic Arts 11 

Evesham Micros 16 

Floppy Shop 42 

George Thompson Svs 30 



Goliath Games 76 

Hammersoft 66 

Hisoft 6 

Homesoft 92 

IDS 92 

Infogrames OBC 

Ladbroke 54 

Mail-Centa 19 

Mailsoft 97 

NBS 42 

Ocean 50-51 

Psygnosis 33 

Qualsoft 57 

Romantic Robot 41 

SDL 73 

ST Club 92 

Selec 19 

Siren Software 23 

Softsellers 90 

SoftvillePD 28 

Syntax 46 

Tiger Software 30 

Worldwide 66 



MAILSOFT | 

SIMPLY THE CHEAPEST MAIL ORDER COMPANY 



SOFTWARE TITLE 

19 

1943 

3IJ 1 HicopU'T 

3D Wander 

3Sinr nils ST 

Action Scrvirv 

Alirn Syndrome 

Anum 

Balance oi Power .... 
Barbarian II 

B.irbnnan ■ I'SY 

Batman 

Bermuda Trina^le 
Beyond Ice I'alacr .. 
Rionie Commando .. 

Ellark Titfrr 

Blazing Barreb 

Bomb Jack 

Bubble Bobbte 

BujcK&Boy 

BuichVr I'lill 

B.C|oui*h Football .. 

Capbne 

Captain Blood .. 

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Cbessmaster 2000 . 

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Chuck Yeajicrs 

Corruption 

Dandv 

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Defender of Crown . 

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Drauon Ninja 

Driller 

Dungeon Master .... 
D. Toms Olympics . 

Echoten 

Eliminator 

Elite 

Empire 

Empire Slrikes 

" .piona^e 

FISSrikcEaKle 

Ferneadez Must Die 

Fish 

Flight Siin 2 

Fo'lt ■ Gremlin 

Foot Director II 

Fool Manager 2 

Foundation Waste .. 

Frontier 

Fusion 

Game Over II 

Garrison 1 or 2 

Ghost St Coblin 



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ST AMIGA 

Sinbad 15.99 

Soccer Supremo , 10.99 
Silent Service ... 
Space Harrier .. 
Space Harrier II 
Spectrum 512 .. 



Scruples . 

STAC 

Star Fleet 1 .. 
Star Trek 
Slanjlider •• 
Suiriilidcr II . 
Siariioose .. 
Siarrav . 



STOS" 23.99 

Street Fighter 15.99 . 

Super Ham* On ... 13.99 
Super Ice Hockey . 



Techno Cop . 
Tesi Drive .... 



. 13.99 . 



Live « bet Di 
Mike REad Quiz 
Moior Massacre 

Naveom 6 

Netherworld 

Mftht Raider 15.99 

\ol a Penny More 13.99 

Obllleralor 15.99 

Operation Wolf 13.99 

Outrun 15.99 

Overlander 13.99 

Overlord 13.99 

PacUnd 13.99 

Pac-Mania 13.99 

Paper Boy 13.99 

Peter Beards ley 13.99 

Platoon 13.99 



1 5 99 

15.99 

16.99 .. 16 99 



Pool of Radiance 



13.99 
19.99 

15.99 
15.99 

15.99 

1399 
13 

15.99 
13.99 

15.99 



. 16.99.. 19.99 



POW 19.99 

Power Drome 18.75 

Quadr Allen 13.99 

Qnanliurn Paint 18.75 

Question of Sports ... 13.99 .. 15.99 

RambolII 13.99 

Red October 15.99 

Return to Atlantis 18.75 

Return 10 Genesis .... 12.99 .. 12.99 

Robocop 13.99 

Rocket Ranger 1 5.99 

Sarfion 3-Chess ....... 16.99 .. 16.99 

Scenery Disk 7 16.99 .. 16.99 

Scenery Disk XI 16.99 

Scenery Disk Japan . 13.99 
Scenery Disk Europe 13.99 



19.99 

. 18.75 

13.99 



. 16.99 . 

. 13.99 . 
. 1 3.99 . 

49 99 
. 13.99 

29.99 
. 1 8.99 
. 12.99 

14.99 . 

14 99 . 
. 13,99 
. 14.99 . 



19.99 
10.99 
16 99 
15.99 
15.99 



. 13 SW . 
18.75 

14.99 . 

15.99 
. 15.99 
. (3.9$ 

13,99. 

, 13.99 
15.99 . 

15 99 . 
15.99 . 



114.99 
14.99 



1599 



.99 



18.7! 
14 99 
19.99 
19.99 



13.99 

15.99 
19.99 
15.99 
14 99 
16.99 
14.99 
15.99 
12.99 



Three Stooges . 
Thunder Blade 
Time Siood Still 
& Ma^ik .. 
Trivial Pursuit . 

Ultima 4 

Uninvited 

Ultimate Golf ... 

L'MS 14.99 

Ultima 3 16.99 

Vcrminator 14.99 

Victory Road 13 99 

irus* 12.99 

Ward Middle Earth 15 99 15.99 

Wee Le Mans 13.09 .. 15.99 

Whirligig 12.99 .. 12.99 

Zynaps 13.99.. 13.99 

•ACCES/JOYSTICKS * 

Mouse Mat 4.99 

Dust Cover 6.99 

3.5 Meadcleaner 6.99 

10 x Unbranded 9 99 

Cruiser J/Slick 9.99 

Cruiser - Clear 1 1.99 

Comp Pro Black 1 1.99 

Comp Pro Clear 12 99 

Comp Pro Extra 13-99 

Quickshot II 7.99 

Quickshot II Turbo 10.99 

Konixs J/Slick 9.99 

Kontxs Autofire 10.99 

SPECIAL *&VER'b*N DISKS *X*0* 

SO\Y/KODAK/ MAXELL/JVC 

VERBATIM DS/DD ONLY 14.99 




— DUST COVERS FROM -n 

BBD - THE 
PROFESSIONAL OPTION 

Protect your Amiga, or Atari with a dust 
cover from the BBD Professional Range. 

Made from best quality proofed nylon that has been treated 

with a flame retardant and an anti-static inhibitor. BBD Dust 

Covers are tastefully finished with contrasting piping. They 

never crack, discolour, tear or fade. They can be washed and 

ironed. So confident are BBD of their quality that they give 

no-quibble guarantee with every cover. 

BBD dust covers are not expensive and all our 

prices include VAT and P & P 



ATARI 520 ST AND 1040 COVER SETS 



Comprising covers for the keyboard, monitor, disc drive and mouse 

Monochrome Sets £9.00 

Colour Sets £8.50 

Atari 520 STFM £4.50 



AMIGA DUST COVER SETS 



Amiga 500, Keyboard only £4.50 

Amiga 1000, one piece cover £7.50 

Amiga 2000, two piece set £9.50 

In addition to the above BBD offer a wide range of other covers. 

These include printer covers from only £5.00 

Why not contact us for further details 



3 1/2" GOLDSTAR BRANDED DISKS 



In keeping with our policy, dealing only in quality, BBD 

now offer GOLDSTAR Branded DSDD 135tpi disks for 

£13.95 per box of 10. 

These disks are 100% error free and carry a 

lifetime guarantee. 



BBD 



DUST 
COVERS 



The Standish Centre, 
Cross Street, Standish, 
Wigan. WN6 0HQ 



Sheer Perfection in Computer Protection 

Telephone: 0257 425839 ext. 33 

Fax: 0257 423909 

Callers and Dealers Enquiries Welcome 



PUBLIC DOMAIN 
SOFTWARE 

Choice selection of English and American 

discs. Only 50p or £1 .00 handling charge 

per disc. 

Send S.A.E. for this month's list to: 

A.P.D. UNLIMITED! 
57 Hill Park Road, Fareham, Hants P01 5 6EW 




his last and most daring ROBBERY, 
With no alarms or visible guards anc 
fabulous treasures, yet it has been 
avoided like the plague by the 
criminal fraternity. Bertie soon 
discovers why? 
AMIGA £19.95 



HIGHWAY HAWK 

Grand Prix driving skil 
to negotiate the crowd 
speed. Obliterate the assassins cars 
and the ones that get in your way 
but keep the tiger in your tank fed, 
the engine cool and the tyres and 
steering intact. Acquisition of faster 
cars and lethal weaponary depends 
on your driving and trading skills. 
AMIGA £19.95 (2 DISCS) 




o 











EMERALD MINE 

A giant arcade adventure which has 
received rave reviews. Each level 
has its own unique solution and 
requires ingenuity and dexterity to 
complete. One player or two players 
TEAM action for added enjoyment. 
AMIGA £14.95 
CBM64-PLUS 4 £7.95 (D) £9.95 





MANIAX 

Maniax relentlessly pursued by 
the creature undertakes to clear 
the thick fog engulfing the world 
capitals, An addictive game 
requiring quick thinking and 
action. 

AMIGA-ST-IBM £19.95 
CBM64-PLUS 4 £7.95 (D) £9.95 





STRIP POKER II PLUS 

A sizzling evening with 
Sam & Donna 

AMIGA-ST-IBM-ARCH, £14.95 
SP-AMS-MSX-BBC-ELECTRON 
CBM64-PLUS 4 £7.95 




QUANTOX 



fast and furious action. Lightning 
responses are secondary to the 
strategic choices between better 
weaponry or better defence. 
AMIGA £14.95 




FACE OFF 

Experience the sheer pace and 
exhilaration of ICE HOCKEY. Be 
prepared for the body checks, 



competition, I or I pia> 
AMIGA-ST-IBM £14.95 



FACE OFF 



T 




MICRO TEXT MICRO BASE 

Ideal for home and business use. Menu driven to enable a novice to use 
powerful capabilities with minimal reference to the tutorial manual. 
Micro base - a powerful data base with fast SEARCH and SORT facilities 
includes a very flexible label printer. Sorted files can be used by the Micro Text 
word Processor to send personalised letters. A boon to any Club Secretary. 
AMIGA £19.95 EACH 



X* 



STRIP POKER II PLUS DATA DISCS 

Requires Strip Poker II Plus disc 



Disc 2 Lee & Roy 
Disc 3 Suzanne & Bianca 
Disc 4 Rachel & Kim 
AMIGA-ST £9.95 




BEVERLEY 




ANCO SOFTWARE LTD, UNIT 9-10 BURNHAM TRADING ESTATE 
OFF LAWSON ROAD, DARTFORD, KENT DA1 5BH TEL: 0322 92513 
MAIL ORDER HOTLINE: 0322 522631 FAX NO: 0322 93422 
PAYMENT BY CHEQUE, P.O., VISA OR ACCESS 




INFOGRAME S^m